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Sacha Baron Cohen hits Rudy Giuliani back over Borat honey trap video


Sacha Baron Cohen has fought back Rudy Giuliani's claims that the borate honey trap video was "a complete invention" saying, "Heaven knows what he did to other journalists in hotel rooms."

The video, a scene from Baron Cohen's Borat sequel, which was fully released on Friday, shows Giuliani in a compromising position in a New York City hotel room next to a young woman posing as a conservative television reporter.

In the scene, President Trump's personal attorney lies on the bed with his hand tucked into his shirt while the woman who plays Borat's daughter Tutar in the film stands nearby.

After a segment of the scene surfaced earlier this week, Giuliani said he didn't put on his shirt until after removing his tape recorder and insisted it was never "inappropriate".

In an interview about ABCs Good morning America On Friday, Baron Cohen was asked to respond after Giuliani accused him of being an "ice cold liar".

"I would say that if the president's lawyer finds out what he has done appropriately there, heaven knows what he has done with other journalists in hotel rooms," said Baron Cohen.

“I urge everyone to watch the film. It is what it is, he did what he did. Make up your own mind. It was pretty clear to us. & # 39;

The scene from Sacha Baron Cohen's Borat sequel, which was fully released on Friday, shows Rudy Giuliani in a compromising position in a New York City hotel room next to a young woman posing as a conservative television reporter

Baron Cohen picked up on Rudy Giuliani's claims on Friday that the borate honey trap video was "a complete invention" and said, "Heaven knows what he did to other journalists in hotel rooms."

Baron Cohen picked up on Rudy Giuliani's claims on Friday that the borate honey trap video was "a complete invention" and said, "Heaven knows what he did to other journalists in hotel rooms."

His comments came when the entire controversial scene surfaced on Amazon Prime the Friday following the release of the film Borat Subsequent Moviefilm.

The scene, filmed at the Mark Hotel in July, shows Giuliani sitting down with 24-year-old actress Maria Bakalova, posing as a conservative reporter, for an interview about the Trump administration's response to COVID-19.

During the scene, Giuliani answered several questions about the coronavirus, including how many lives Trump had saved because of his handling of the pandemic.

In the interview scene, the woman was flirtatious with Giuliani and could repeatedly see his knee touching.

She also told him he was "one of her greatest heroes" and that she felt like she was in a fairy tale. She once said she felt like Melania Trump.

After being interrupted by Baron Cohen's Borat character, who was disguised as a sound engineer, the scene shows Giuliani following the woman into the hotel room and asking, "Should we have a drink in the bedroom?"

The 30-second scene in the bedroom cuts repeatedly to different images from the various hidden cameras. It's not clear how much of this was edited together to portray a particular plot.

It shows Giuliani asking for her phone number and address. This sound is played through a take where the woman removes her microphone and pats her on her lower back.

He can then be seen lying on the bed putting on his shirt after she helped him remove his recorder.

He's got his hands in his pants when Baron Cohen's character walks in for the second time in a fancy outfit.

In the scene, President Trump's personal lawyer lies on the bed with his hand tucking his shirt into his pants while the woman stands nearby

In the scene, President Trump's personal attorney is lying on the bed with his hand tucking his shirt while the woman stands nearby

In one part you can hear Giuliani asking for the woman's phone number and address. This sound is played through a take where the woman removes her microphone and pats her on her lower back

In one part you can hear Giuliani asking for the woman's phone number and address. This sound is played through a take where the woman removes her microphone and pats her on her lower back

Speaking about the scene during Friday's GMA interview, Baron Cohen said he was in hiding in the hotel room, keeping an eye on what was going on.

"I was pretty worried about her during the scene," said Baron Cohen.

After a segment of the scene surfaced earlier this week, Giuliani said he didn't put on his shirt until after removing his tape recorder and insisted it was never "inappropriate".

After a segment of the scene surfaced earlier this week, Giuliani said he didn't put on his shirt until after removing his tape recorder and insisted it was never "inappropriate".

“We built a hideout that I would hide in during the scene. I monitored it by text. As the producer, I am responsible for looking after the main actor. & # 39;

Bakalova, who joined Baron Cohen for the interview, said she felt safe all the time.

After a clip of the scene surfaced this week before the film was released, Giuliani declared it was a "hit job" and a "total invention".

"The Borat video is a complete invention," he tweeted.

“I put my shirt on after taking off the tape recorder. At no point before, during, or after the interview was I ever inappropriate. If Sacha Baron Cohen suggests otherwise, he is an ice cold liar.

"This is an effort to defuse my relentless exposure of the crime and depravity of Joe Biden and his entire family."

When Giuliani spoke on WABC on his weekly radio program on Wednesday, he doubled that he was only wearing his shirt.

"I'll put my shirt on, I assure you, that's all I've done," he said.

Speaking about the scene during Friday's GMA interview, Baron Cohen said he was in hiding in the hotel room, keeping an eye on what was going on. Maria Bakalova, who was the woman on the scene, said she felt safe all the time

Speaking about the scene during Friday's GMA interview, Baron Cohen said he was in hiding in the hotel room, keeping an eye on what was going on. Maria Bakalova, who was the woman on the scene, said she felt safe all the time

Giuliani said he went to an interview he thought was "legitimate".

"I did the interview with the young woman who was new to the interview and I was nice to her," he said. "At one point she explained some problems I was having, I actually prayed with her."

When he got up to leave, he said he was wearing his jacket.

“I was fully clothed at all times and had to take off the electronic devices. When the electronics came off, part of it was in the back and my shirt was pulling out a little, coming out a little even though my clothes were completely on, ”he said.

He said he realized something was wrong when the woman asked if he would like a massage.

"She says something about" Do I want a massage? "I realize now that this is a facility, and I'll call my security guard Brian, who is right outside the door," Giuliani said. "And then all of a sudden the crazy Sacha Baron Cohen runs in with a cloak and he screams and shouts all kinds of stupid things. "

The former New York mayor called the police after the encounter, but there is no evidence that an investigation has opened.

Giuliani spoke to Page 6 of the New York Post about the July encounter but made no mention of the bedroom aspect.

He has since argued that calling the police proved he was an innocent party.

"If I had done something wrong I would not have called the police and if he had done something right he would not have run away," said Giuliani.

Borat review: Crass, vulgar … but if you love the first film, you will be amazed, writes BRIAN VINER, who gives it four stars

Borat Follow-up film: Amazing bribe handed over to the American regime to support the once glorious nation of Kazakhstan

Rating:

Donald Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani isn't the only person authorized to finger-watch Borat 2. For the rest of us, too, this is sometimes the only correct answer to a comedy that doesn't reach the limits of taste so much as loot it over the edge of a cliff.

The setup is the same as the 2006 mockumentary that first introduced Sacha Baron Cohen's fictional Kazakh journalist into an unsuspecting world.

Baron Cohens Borat, this time accompanied by his teenage daughter Tutar (Maria Bakalova), travels through America fooling real people into believing that he is the real article.

For years since the events of 2006, he has broken stones into the gulag to shame his country by making it a global mockery.

But now he's received a mission – and with it a chance to save his reputation. Again and again he convinces people that he really brought Tutar as a present for "Vice Premier Mikhail Pence", the deputy of the great "Prime Minister McDonald Trump", to redeem his distant home from the eyes of the "USA and A".

Baron Cohen breaks the unwritten rules of comedy again

Baron Cohen breaks the unwritten rules of comedy again

Vice President Mike Pence didn't know at the time, but when he gave his speech at the CPAC earlier this year, he actually attended a secret sequel to Borat (pictured)

Vice President Mike Pence didn't know it then, but when he gave his speech at the CPAC earlier this year, he actually attended a secret sequel to Borat (pictured)

The results – including a scene in which he disguised himself as Trump interrupts Pence's address to a Republican rally – are again inflammatory funny and almost unobservably unpleasant.

There is another scene where Borat and Tutar attend a debutant ball in the city of Macon, southern Georgia.

She is solemnly as a student at & # 39; Grand Canyon University & # 39; Introduced and studied & # 39; cage maintenance and electronics with a focus on VCR repairs & # 39 ;.

Just as you marvel at their XX-size gullibility and process the sheer improbability of proud fathers and their daughters of southern beauty dressed up to nine and walking through this absurd social rigmarol in the 21st century while the laughter gushes again in yours Hals at the drama of the Kazakh duo who went down to perform their fertility dance, it curdled into something completely different.

Baron Cohen breaks the unwritten rules of comedy again. Is it outrage? Horror? Disgust? Suppressed hysteria? You have to decide for yourself.

In a way, this is Baron Cohen's genius. Once again, he has mastered a movie (although directed by Jason Woliner) that is beyond the skill or daring of others.

He turns everyone he and Tutar meet into patsies, none other than Giuliani, the 76-year-old former mayor of New York City, who gives this committed foreign girl an interview in a hotel suite – and then finds herself in a situation that sees horribly compromising unless it is a cinematic manual skill.

Borat and Tutar attend a debutant ball in the city of Macon, southern Georgia

Borat and Tutar attend a debutant ball in the city of Macon, southern Georgia

I've seen it twice already and still not quite sure what I saw. In any case, the 24-year-old Bulgarian actress Bakalova is incredibly good – occasionally even staging Baron Cohen himself.

Just like the original, Borat 2 is boldly brilliant in that at first it looks like a Mickey take from a backward, former Soviet republic when America is really the only object of ridicule.

This film is specifically about catching the die-hard Trump supporters and far-right conspiracy theorists who pick up on more than a few others on their satirical web, such as a cosmetic surgeon who loves to puff 15-year-old Tutar's breasts just want to be the next "Queen Melania".

Most of them inadvertently plot in their own ridiculousness, though there are times – like a kind Holocaust survivor in a synagogue – when your heart runs out. Not everyone deserves to be one of Borat's victims.

Likewise, not everyone will want to see this film. If the TV show Game For A Laugh made you wince, it's definitely not for you.

The same is true if you think everyone should let their beliefs and ways of life go without being played as a fool by a subversive Englishman with an open camera and political agenda.

Even so, there have been moments when it made me laugh more than any other movie in ages, possibly since the original Borat.

And three applause for its topicality. MeToo sensitivities are cheekily addressed when Tutar realizes that the oppression of women in their own country – where it is anchored in law that men are not allowed to love their daughters as much as their sons – is not the case everywhere.

And there is an inspired twist that affects the Covid-19 pandemic.

But maybe I've already given too much away. If you loved the original Borat, you will be amazed again. This one is even better.

If you thought it was gross, vulgar, and indescribably childish, then this is a good deal worse.

Borat 2 is available starting today on Amazon Prime Video.

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