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Ryanair's chief is angry with the government's "idiotic" quarantine plan for coronaviruses


Ryanair's chief is furious with the government's "idiotic" plans to require 14-day coronavirus quarantine upon arrival in the UK as ministers strike a new blow to vacation hopes

  • Airlines have warned that strict quarantine will kill the aviation and tourism industries
  • The culture minister says exceptions to the 14-day quarantine will be "very limited".
  • Ryanair boss Michael O & # 39; Leary says the plan is "stupid" and cannot be implemented
  • Here's how you can help people affected by Covid-19

Ryanair chief Michael O & # 39; Leary today launched a cruel attack on government plans for a 14-day quarantine on arrivals in the UK.

The ministers are expected to set the new rules, with hopes of summer vacations likely to be dashed as the exceptions are largely limited to truck drivers.

However, Mr. O & # 39; Leary rejected claims that this would prevent his goal of resuming flights in July and said that he believed the directive was so "deficient" and impossible to enforce that the public they'll just ignore them.

He insisted that the government "catch up" and face masks are the best way to protect the traveling audience – although many scientists say they are of limited use.

Minister of Culture Oliver Dowden signaled this morning that there is little chance that vacation destinations will be spared and that the exceptions will be "very limited".

Ryanair chief Michael O & # 39; Leary (file) today launched a cruel attack on government plans for a 14-day quarantine on UK arrivals

Instead, the tourism industry wants the government to focus on measures that can resume flights within weeks

Instead, the tourism industry wants the government to focus on measures that can resume flights within weeks

Mr O & # 39; Leary told BBC Radio 4's Today program that the plans were "unworkable, unmanageable, and unpolishable." File image of Ryanair aircraft in Dublin

Mr O & # 39; Leary told BBC Radio 4's Today program that the plans were "unworkable, unmanageable, and unpolishable." File image of Ryanair aircraft in Dublin

It goes without saying that freight forwarders make up two thirds of those who do not have to isolate themselves for two weeks.

The remaining exceptions are agreed in a cabinet committee chaired by Michael Gove.

They are expected to include people who "support national security or critical infrastructure and meet Britain's international obligations," officials said.

Scientists researching the corona virus can also be exempt.

But Mr. O & # 39; Leary told BBC Radio 4's Today program that the plans were "unworkable, unmanageable, and unpolishable."

"People will just ignore something that is so hopelessly flawed … let's take some effective measures like face masks," he said.

"All you get back from the UK government is" we don't know ".

"It is ridiculous that this government can work out plans for a quarantine that is strictly and fully enforced …

& # 39; It's idiotic and unworkable. There are not enough police officers in Britain. «

He added: “The two-week ban is in no way medical or scientific. If you want to do something that is effective, wear masks. & # 39;

Mr O & # 39; Leary said the policy had "no credibility" and predicted that it would be canceled by June.

He insisted that research had shown that face masks could reduce the risk of Covid-19 infection by 98.5 percent.

He told Sky News that the government is "making up for everything while they participate."

Oliver Dowden said the quarantine rules for people traveling to the UK are enforced by law

Oliver Dowden said the quarantine rules for people traveling to the UK are enforced by law

Truck drivers are expected to make up the majority of people exempt from quarantine rules when traveling to other countries (stock photo).

Truck drivers are expected to make up the majority of people exempt from quarantine rules when traveling to other countries (stock photo).

Mr Dowden said that quarantine rules for people traveling to the UK are enforced by law.

He said today: “We would review the relevant enforcement mechanisms as we would with other measures.

"For example, the measures we took when we introduced the so-called ban – these were underpinned by regulations that had legal ramifications, and I'm sure we'll do the same."

He said there would be "very limited" exceptions to the rules.

John Holland-Kaye, Heathrow's chief, expressed hopes of looser rules yesterday and told Sky News: “If two countries have a very low risk of transmission in each country, there should be a free flow of passengers.

"But if a country were at very high risk with rising infection rates and poor controls, there would be very strict controls for anyone entering the UK from these markets."

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