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Russia is capable of killing tens of thousands with a new chemical weapon attack


Russia has the potential to kill thousands with a second chemical weapon attack on the streets of Britain, the Defense Secretary has warned.

Ben Wallace admitted that, after a spate of activity in British waters in recent weeks, Russian behavior "is no longer up to the norms it used to be," the Daily Telegraph reported.

He stressed that while the UK hopes to forge a relationship with Russia, tensions mounted after the government used a nerve agent on the streets of the UK two years ago.

Former Russian spy Sergei Skripal (69) and his daughter Yulia were poisoned with the Russian nerve agent Novichok in Salisbury in March 2018.

Both survived, although Mr Skripal, incarcerated in Russia in 2006 for selling secrets to MI6, required a tracheostomy and is now breathing through a tube.

Russia has the potential to kill thousands with a second chemical weapon attack on the streets of Britain, the Defense Secretary has warned. Pictured: Novichok victim Dawn Sturgess

Ben Wallace admitted that after a spate of activity in British waters in recent weeks, Russian behavior "is no longer up to the norms it used to be". Pictured: Vladimir Putin

Ben Wallace admitted that after a spate of activity in British waters in recent weeks, Russian behavior "is no longer up to the norms it used to be". Pictured: Vladimir Putin

The attack later claimed the lives of mother of three, Dawn Sturgess, who is believed to have come into contact with the nerve agent after picking up a perfume bottle in a public park.

During a visit to the tapa warehouse in Estonia, Wallace said, "These types of nerve agents, delivered differently, could kill thousands of people."

It comes when Ms. Sturgess' family took legal action against Russia after her death four months after the Salisbury attack, Der Spiegel reported.

Lawyers from the victim's family have initiated proceedings under the European Convention on Human Rights in the High Court in London.

The lawsuit against the Russian Federation, its Ministry of Defense and Military Intelligence gives them the right to sue in the future.

Novichok was used in Salisbury in March 2018 in the assassination attempt on former Russian double agent Sergei Skripal (right) (68) and his daughter Yulia (left) (36)

The mother of three, Dawn Sturgess (pictured), and her partner Charlie Rowley fell ill in the Amesbury, Salisbury apartment after picking up a perfume bottle containing the poison

Mrs. Sturgess' partner, Charlie Rowley (pictured)

The mother of three, Dawn Sturgess (left) and partner Charlie Rowley (right) fell ill after handling the poison with a perfume bottle. Ms. Sturgess died on July 8th this year in Salisbury, Wiltshire hospital. Mr. Rowley was left seriously ill but recovered

Ms. Sturgess' family has taken legal action against Russia four months after the Salisbury attack after her death. Pictured: Police at the crime scene in Muggleton

Ms. Sturgess' family has taken legal action against Russia four months after the Salisbury attack after her death. Pictured: Police at the crime scene in Muggleton

The details of the case are not yet known and will not be heard until an investigation into Ms. Sturgess' death is completed.

Last month, the apartment where Ms. Sturgess was fatally poisoned with the nerve agent was left to rubble during a three-week demolition.

What is novichok? The Russian nerve agent who poisoned five

Novichok was Developed secretly by the Soviet Union during the height of the Cold War in the 1970s and 1980s.

Communist scientists developed the poison in such a way that it could not be detected by NATO's chemical detection equipment.

They come in the form of an ultra-fine powder, Novichok is up to eight times more powerful than the deadly VX gas.

Victims who are poisoned by the powder experience muscle cramps, breathing problems and subsequent cardiac arrest. There is a well-known antidote to the nerve agent.

But atropine can block the poison Doctors find it very difficult to give the antidote because the dose would have to be so high that it could prove fatal to the person.

The mother of three collapsed at her partner Charlie Rowley's in Amesbury near Salisbury on June 30, 2018 after spraying the nerve agent hidden in a perfume bottle on both wrists.

She was hospitalized but died on July 8th that year. Her partner became seriously ill but recovered.

In 2018 it was announced that the government was buying Mr Skripal and Mr Bailey's homes as part of its clean-up operation.

According to The Guardian, Sergei Skripal's house was "demolished" in January 2019.

While work on Mr. Rowley's former home was being carried out, the roof was removed and replaced, while internal items were covered and removed from the house as part of a clean-up operation.

The property on Muggleton Road is one of two terrace apartments that were demolished in a three-week process.

Housing provider Stonewater said it worked "very closely" with Wiltshire Council and consulted with residents on the best route for Mr Rowley's former home.

"The cleared area will be landscaped and create additional green space for the local community. We will provide two additional houses in an alternative development nearby to ensure that there is no loss of affordable housing in South Wiltshire," a spokeswoman said.

“While we cannot forget what happened on this property, we are delighted that we were able to work together to bring about this successful conclusion.

"We will do our best to keep disruptions as low as possible."

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