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RSPCA call for BBC Three show called Will My Puppies Make Me Rich for scrapping


RSPCA is demanding that the BBC Three show Will My Puppies Make Me Rich be scrapped, claiming that it glorifies dog breeding

  • BBC Three & # 39; s Will My Puppies Make Me Rich is accused of glorifying animal abuse
  • The show follows young & # 39; social media savvy & # 39; Puppy breeders who are in the & # 39; business & # 39; start.
  • The RSPCA and other animal rights activists have called the show "dangerous".

A BBC Three show called Will My Puppies Make Me Rich has been criticized for glorifying puppy breeding and promoting cruelty to animals.

The show focuses on the rise of puppy breeding as a business among "ambitious social media savvy 20 year olds" looking to make money selling "designer dogs".

However, a number of animal rights activists, including the RSPCA, have described the puppy-breeding program as an "ambitious" business venture for youth in the "north" to undertake in response to the loss of Covid-19 jobs.

BBC3 controller Fiona Campbell, who commissioned the program from Salford-based production company Nine Lives, said, "We chose (the show) because we love ideas that are ambitious and the business aspect that goes into this show is branded in, feels really timely and ambitious. "

The BBC Three Show says the average puppy price has doubled in the past six months due to Covid-19. Pictured: Stock Photo of a Staffordshire Bull Terrier Puppy

The RSPCA said they teamed up with a number of animal rights groups to write to the BBC demanding that the show be canceled.

An RSPCA spokesman told The Mirror: "We are aware of this program and are concerned that it is extremely irresponsible to promote and glorify breeding as a" get rich quick "program, which in turn creates serious problems with it The illegal puppy trade could lead to the well-being and fuel of dogs.

"Together with a number of other animal welfare and veterinary organizations who shared our concerns, we wrote a joint letter to the programmer and BBC Three asking them to rethink."

Marc Abraham, the founder of Lucy & # 39; s Law, hit back on the BBC commission for the show, writing in a statement, “I am deeply concerned with other animal rights campaigners and dog lovers across the UK that this program is not all bad designed and exploitative for animals, but also potentially dangerous.

The show is produced by documentaries Sophia Slater and Helena Rochester (picture)

The show is produced by documentaries Sophia Slater and Helena Rochester (picture)

& # 39; Any show that follows individuals who breed dogs with little or no knowledge and experience, with the sole intention of making a profit, implies that doing so is a fair, even ambitious, endeavor to make money. an extremely irresponsible message sent to viewers by a publicly funded or other organization. & # 39;

He continued, “It is extremely disappointing that BBC THREE is commissioning a documentary that effectively promotes and pursues a business experiment in dog breeding, especially when the pandemic has seen an increase in irresponsible dog breeding practices at home and abroad, which is not one Risk represents the welfare of the dogs, puppies, and humans directly involved, but potentially cruelty that can only adversely affect the lives of thousands of other dogs and people.

"I sincerely hope that BBC THREE will reconsider this terrible idea that only goes to normalize and promote dog breeding for money."

Downtown Abbey actor Peter Egan tweeted that he was "really shocked" by the idea of ​​the program

Downtown Abbey actor Peter Egan tweeted that he was "really shocked" by the idea of ​​the program

Downtown Abbey actor Peter Egan tweeted, “This is possibly the worst idea I've ever heard. @Bbcthree clearly has no idea about creative programming, if that's an example of their work. That really shocks me. & # 39;

Information on the BBC website about the shows states, "With average puppy prices doubling in the past six months due to Covid-19, this latest movie will examine some of the 20 year olds looking to start new businesses that want designer Breeding canines. "

The show highlights the pitfalls of dog breeding, as the BBC website goes on to state: “The film will follow young breeders as they try to build their business and get them serious.

"But with puppies for life, and not just with lockdown and an increase in" bad breeders "looking to make money quickly, there is also research and discussion of what constitutes good and bad practices in the world of dog breeding."

The show is produced by documentaries Sophia Slater and Helena Rochester.

The BBC was asked to comment.

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