ENTERTAINMENT

Rishi Sunak promises £ 1,000 for EVERY worker brought back from vacation


How will Rishi's £ 1,000 vacation bonus per employee work and will companies benefit?

  • As part of the Jobs Retention Bonus program, businesses receive £ 1,000 for every employee they bring back from vacation.
  • The bonus will be apply to everyone who has been brought back to work from vacation – even if they have returned before today's household.
  • To avoid companies benefiting from this, they have to keep everyone busy until January and pay them an average of at least £ 520 a month.
  • If all 9 million workers on leave are withdrawn from their employer, the system will cost the government £ 9 billion, the Chancellor said today.
  • Some have suggested that companies could take advantage of the £ 1,000 incentive to prevent layoffs from having and not intending to lay off unemployed workers.

Pay companies a £ 1,000 bonus to keep jobs for every person they get back to work after being locked out on vacation and taxpayers picking up the £ 9 billion bill.

The Chancellor broke the tradition by announcing taxpayer-funded shock policies at the start of his Commons statement, when experts warned that a "tsunami" of layoffs would follow if the system ended in October.

The bonus will be paid to any company whose previously hired worker has the same job after January 31, 2021 and earns at least £ 520 per month.

The £ 1,000 promise per person costs £ 9bn and is part of Mr Sunak's promise to keep as many people as possible after the pandemic has driven Britain into recession.

Critics said, however, that millions of workers on leave have already returned to work, which means that Mr. Sunak will pay billions of pounds to companies that have already decided to bring employees back to the office, shop, factory or construction site , with no intention of firing her.

Others have said that employers may wait until early next year to claim their bonus from the taxpayer and then fire their employees – or don't see £ 1,000 as an incentive enough to employ anyone until January and fire them now.

Rishi Sunak explained the new bonus program to the Commons: “If you are an employer and bring someone back on vacation – and keep them busy until January – we will give you a bonus of £ 1,000 per employee.

“It is not only because of this that vital people return, they also have to do decent work. In order for companies to receive the bonus, employees must receive an average of at least £ 520 per month from November to the end of January – this corresponds to the lower income limit in social security. "

The measures announced today include:

  • Mr. Sunak announced a 50% discount on measures to get customers back to restaurants, cafes and pubs Monday through Wednesday in August up to a maximum discount of £ 10 per head for everyone. Companies can then claim the money back;
  • The stamp duty threshold will be raised from £ 125,000 to £ 300,000 to £ 500,000 for six months to boost the property market.
  • A radical plan to pay the wages of up to 300,000 young people for universal loans if companies agreed to stop them for at least six months;
  • A £ 2 billion program to subsidize home insulation and other environmental improvements that ministers hope will support more than 100,000 jobs;
  • A temporary cut in VAT, which is likely to focus on difficult areas such as the hospitality industry;

Chancellor Rishi Sunak, pictured today, has pledged £ 1,000 to each person to bring them back to work after a vacation by lock

The bonus is paid to any employee on leave who has the same job after January 31st and earns at least £ 520 a month

Unemployment is around four percent, but some fear it could reach 14 percent without the help of the Treasury.

The Chancellor said if employers brought back all nine million people on vacation, it would be a £ 9 billion policy.

He added: "Our message to the business is clear: if you stand by your workers, we will stand by you."

Chancellor Rishi Sunak said the second phase of the government plan is about jobs, while the third phase focuses on reconstruction.

He added that he would prepare a budget and spending review in the fall.

Mr. Sunak said that the vacation program could not and should not last forever and said to the MPs: “I know that it will be a difficult moment when the vacation ends. I am also sure that when I say that the program has to end in October, critics will say that it should end in November.

“When I say it should end in November, critics will say December. But the truth is, the call for endless vacation extensions is just as irresponsible as it would have been in June to end the program overnight. We have to be honest. & # 39;

He continued in the House of Commons: “Leaving the vacation program open forever gives people the false hope that it will always be possible to go back to the jobs they previously had.

“And the longer people are on vacation, the more likely their abilities will deteriorate and it will be harder for them to find new opportunities. It is in the long-term interests of no one to continue the program forever – least of all those who are caught in a job that can only exist due to government subsidies. "

9.4 million jobs are currently on vacation, costing £ 27.4 billion and increasing

9.4 million jobs are currently on vacation, costing £ 27.4 billion and increasing

Sunaks & # 39; Mini Budget & # 39; package at a glance

The stamp duty threshold will be raised from £ 125,000 to £ 300,000 to £ 500,000 for six months to boost the property market.

A radical plan to pay the wages of up to 300,000 young people for universal loans if companies agreed to stop them for at least six months;

A £ 2 billion program to subsidize home insulation and other environmental improvements that ministers hope will support more than 100,000 jobs;

A temporary cut in VAT, which is likely to focus on difficult areas such as the hospitality industry;

Schools, hospitals and other public buildings are said to receive £ 1 billion to make them more environmentally friendly and energy efficient.

About £ 50m to finance retrofitting of social housing with insulation, double glazing and heat pumps;

Conservation programs that provide £ 40 million to plant trees, clean up rivers and create new green spaces.

He said the "job retention bonus" would reward employers and create incentives to bring back staff on leave.

The Chancellor told ministers in a mini-budget that the government would do everything to keep people at work.

Sunak told MPs that his "job plan" would help make a living after the economy shrank 25% in just two months.

He said: “We have taken decisive measures to protect our economy.

“But people are worried about losing their jobs and increasing unemployment. We won't just accept that.

“People need to know that we will do everything we can to give everyone the opportunity to work well and safely.

"People need to know that, despite the need ahead, no one will be left without hope."

Chancellor Rishi Sunak presented the financial support for companies on vacation – officially known as the Coronavirus Jobs Retention Scheme – in March and was launched the following month.

The aim is to help companies retain employees who would otherwise have been made redundant and to provide them with a grant of 80 percentage points or up to £ 2,500 per month for the wages of an employee on leave.

According to official figures, around 9.3 million jobs are currently supported by the program, although Sunak has announced that it will be cut in August.

Experts have predicted that the total cost could reach £ 60bn by the end of October.

Several large companies such as the Burberry fashion brand, the home builder Persimmon and the Paddy Power owner Flutter have taken a stand by avoiding using the program.

However, use by other large companies that are extremely profitable has proven to be controversial, and there is also concern that some employers will pocket the money and workers will be fired afterwards.

The OECD has warned that the unemployment rate could hit almost 15 percent at a second peak of the coronavirus

The OECD has warned that the unemployment rate could hit almost 15 percent at a second peak of the coronavirus