TOP TRENDING

Right now, the angry Tesco shopper is yelling as he rips plastic off items in Wales


An angry shopper was filmed tearing off plastic wrap from banned "non-essential" goods while "opposing" Covid's "immoral" actions in Wales.

Gwilym Owen tore off covers last night at Tesco in Bangor, where employees were packing items that were deemed not important by the country's government.

The 28-year-old DJ, who wasn't wearing a mask, shouted, "Since when have clothes been exempted? Tear off the fuckers … Children who fuck clothes, it's a shame."

A security guard approached Mr. Owen and replied, "Since when is clothing no longer essential?"

The shop worker, wearing a face mask, confronted him with an F&F label booth while the cameraman ran away from another employee.

Wales was thrown into a draconian "fire safety" lockdown at 6pm yesterday and is expected to ruin the Welsh economy.

During the move, which will last 17 days, people will have to stay home and leave for limited reasons, including moving around, buying essentials, or grooming.

However, around 17,000 people have signed a petition to the Welsh government to ease restrictions.

Gwilym Owen, who was not wearing a mask, removes covers in a shop that are no longer sold under the new Welsh lockdown restrictions

You can hear the man scream: "Since when have clothes been released?", "Tear off the fucks!" and & # 39; kids & # 39; who fuck clothes it's a shame & # 39;

You can hear the man scream: "Since when have clothes been released?", "Tear off the fucks!" and & # 39; kids & # 39; who fuck clothes it's a shame & # 39;

He added on Facebook, “I had enough last night. I don't care about the game I can get from it. & # 39;

He added on Facebook, “I had enough last night. I don't care about the game I can get from it. & # 39;

Officials will enforce Covid-19 restrictions over the weekend to crack down on motorists who oppose First Minister Mark Drakeford's "power-mad" attempt to quell the virus

Officials will enforce Covid-19 restrictions over the weekend to crack down on motorists who oppose First Minister Mark Drakeford's "power-mad" attempt to quell the virus

Elsewhere in Wales' fight against coronavirus:

  • Thousands of people signed a petition calling on the Welsh government to lift the ban on supermarkets selling non-essential items during the fire.
  • Another 1,324 people tested positive for coronavirus, bringing the total number of confirmed cases to 41,577.
  • According to Public Health Wales, 16 people had died from Covid-19 and the total number of deaths from the pandemic rose to 1,772.
  • Church leaders wrote to the Welsh Congregation to request a review of the lockdown that has banned churches in Wales from opening for three Sundays.
  • Police last night revealed extraordinary plans to patrol the Anglo-Welsh border to prevent families from crossing for a half-time vacation.

In a subsequent post on Facebook, Mr. Owen said, “I had enough last night. I don't care about the game I can get from it.

"I've heard supermarkets have covered" non-essential "things like clothes. It's winter now and who would have thought that clothes weren't strictly necessary for children?

“I'm sure there are people out there who can barely afford to heat their homes and now they want to stop people from buying clothes in supermarkets.

“I don't expect everyone to do what I've done here, but I do expect everyone to know that it is nothing but immoral and inhumane to deny public dress.

“So no, I'm not ashamed of what I've done.

In a subsequent post on Facebook, Mr. Owen said, “I had enough last night. I don't care about the game I can get from it. & # 39;

In a subsequent post on Facebook, Mr. Owen said, “I had enough last night. I don't care about the game I can get from it. & # 39;

“I'm not ready to live in a society where they can take away basic human needs like buying new clothes, especially for children. So I'll do what I can to stop it.

“I'm dealing with what's going on, and we need more people who stand up for what's right! That was my booth. & # 39;

Just hours before going to Tesco, Mr Owen wrote, "I urge everyone to open these 'nonessential' aisles in supermarkets in order to open them!

& # 39; Take off the covers! Clothing is one of the things that wasn't for sale in Tesco, that's tyranny!

“I saw a great quote today that goes 100% with all of this. Power is like weeds. Your garden will overgrow if you don't prune it any further. We have to cut it back! & # 39;

A Tesco spokesperson said: "We are currently unable to sell 'nonessential' items in our stores under the new restrictions imposed by the Welsh government.

"Our colleagues have worked hard to implement these measures and we ask customers to be aware of these restrictions."

Opposition leader Paul Davies has written to the chairman of the Welsh Parliament asking for members to be called back to discuss the ban.

Social media users poked fun at the new restrictions while opposition politicians in Wales have called for Parliament to be recalled so they can discuss the rules

Social media users poked fun at the new restrictions while opposition politicians in Wales have called for Parliament to be recalled so they can discuss the rules

More than 17,000 people have signed a petition to the Welsh government to limit the restrictions

More than 17,000 people have signed a petition to the Welsh government to limit the restrictions

Supermarket workers were told to cover up "nonessential" items

Supermarket workers were instructed to cover up "nonessential" items

Social media users have criticized the Welsh government's restrictions on preventing children's clothing from being sold

Social media users have criticized the Welsh Government's restrictions on preventing children's clothing from being sold

Others have condemned the decision to order supermarkets to stop selling books

Others have condemned the decision to order supermarkets to stop selling books

Opposition leaders in Wales have expressed concern about the restrictions

Opposition leaders in Wales have expressed concern about the restrictions

Social media users have suggested that books and maps can improve people's mental health

Social media users have suggested that books and maps can improve people's mental health

A supermarket in Wales - where baby clothes are not considered essential but there is plenty of Smirnoff vodka to buy

A supermarket in Wales – where baby clothes are not considered essential but there is plenty of Smirnoff vodka to buy

In a statement alongside the letter, Mr. Davies said, “It is insane that people have been banned from buying books, trash cans and baby clothes from local stores.

“The Welsh Labor-led government may not consider these issues essential, but many will differ.

& # 39; The Wales-wide lockdown is disproportionate, unnecessary and bites our economy hard. I would rather see people in stores in their communities buy items that provide work to locals than spend millions at online internet giants. & # 39;

He said the petition was a "clear sign" that people want the rule "to be abolished immediately and the Welsh Parliament must meet to resolve this matter as soon as possible".

Chris Noden

Chris Noden

Chris Noden went shopping in Newport, Gwent only wore his boxer shorts and a face mask because "clothes are not essential items".

Mr. Noden was stopped by a security guard who claimed he was inappropriately dressed

Mr. Noden was stopped by a security guard who claimed he was inappropriately dressed

As a father in Newport, Gwent was stopped by security after attempting to shop at his local Tesco while wearing only a pair of boxer shorts and his mask after clothing was classified as "not essential".

Chris Noden, 38, was filmed by his wife, 33, trying to go shopping.

She said to a security guard, "Clothing is not essential – let him in."

& # 39; Clothing is now viewed as not essential. Their business policy is that clothing is not essential.

Mr. Noden was filmed in the picture by his wife Dawn

Mr. Noden was filmed in the picture by his wife Dawn

“Let him in to buy some clothes.

& # 39; That's more than a joke. There are children growing out there who need clothes.

But a guard replied, “He is not dressed appropriately. Go take on the government.

"You can't come in dressed like that."

The Welsh government also defended supermarket bans on selling non-essential items.

It was tweeted today: “Supermarkets can continue to sell items you can find in other major stores – such as stationery / greeting cards.

“The purpose of only selling important items during the fire break is to avoid spending more time in stores than necessary and to be fair to retailers who have to close.

“It shouldn't be difficult – we have to do everything we can to minimize the time we spend outside our homes. This will help save lives and protect the NHS. & # 39;

The North Wales Police have been asked for an opinion.

Supermarket workers in Wales covered kettles and phone chargers on shelves when "power-mad" First Minister Mark Drakeford banned the sale of "non-essential" items during the country's coronavirus blaze lockdown

Supermarket workers in Wales covered kettles and phone chargers on shelves when "power-mad" First Minister Mark Drakeford banned the sale of "non-essential" items during the lockdown of the country's coronavirus fire

Lidl closed all "non-essential" aisles in Porthmadog yesterday before 6 p.m. and the ban should apply to the complete closure

Lidl closed all "non-essential" aisles in Porthmadog yesterday before 6pm, and the ban should apply to the complete closure

Plastic sheeting has been placed over electrical appliances that are banned from being sold in this Welsh Asda store tonight

Plastic sheeting has been placed over electrical appliances that are banned from being sold in this Welsh Asda store tonight

Pallets of inventory are blocking access to non-essential goods in the Sainsburys store in Crindau, Newport, at the start of the fire lockdown

Pallets of inventory are blocking access to non-essential goods in the Sainsburys store in Crindau, Newport, at the start of the fire lockdown

Thousands of people have signed a petition calling on the Welsh Government to lift a ban on supermarkets selling non-essential items during the fire lockdown in Wales.

First Secretary Mark Drakeford said the restriction is a "fairness issue" as non-essential retail stores will have to close during the two-week period that began at 6pm on Friday and will last until November 9th.

A petition asking the Welsh government to allow supermarkets to sell non-essential items had received more than 17,000 signatures as of Saturday afternoon.

Not essential or essential? What we know about which goods are banned in Wales' fire safety

First Minister Mark Drakeford has announced that non-essential items will not be allowed to be sold during the country's fire lockdown.

To date, the Welsh Government has not published a public list of the goods.

The supermarkets also didn't respond if they were given specific instructions on what they couldn't sell.

However, the information gathered yesterday suggests that these items cannot be sold during the 17 days of restrictions:

  • Hairdryer
  • Stationary
  • water heater
  • Phone chargers
  • Duvets
  • leaves
  • Electrical products

The petition states: “We disagree that this is a prudent or rational measure and that it will cause more harm than good.

“For example, we disagree that parents should be prevented from buying clothes for their children while they are blocked from shopping.

"It is disproportionate and cruel and we demand that the decision be reversed immediately."

Conservative MS Russell George said it was "unfair" to force independent clothing and hardware retailers to close while similar goods were being sold in large supermarkets.

On Saturday, Andrew RT Davies, Shadow Health Secretary for the Welsh Conservatives, called for the ban to be lifted immediately.

He said: “I have never seen such a violent backlash against a decision by the Welsh Labor government.

"This ridiculous ban has caused real anger across Wales and it is not fair to our supermarket staff and the general Welsh public who have already run out of a difficult fortnight."

Thousands of people have signed a petition calling on the Welsh government to lift the ban on supermarkets selling non-essential items.

First Secretary Mark Drakeford said the restriction is a "fairness issue" as non-essential retail stores will have to close during the two-week period that began at 6pm on Friday and will last until November 9th.

Best selling author CL Taylor expressed surprise that literature was placed on the banned list.

She wrote on Twitter: & # 39; Woah what? Books aren't essential items in Wales? & # 39;

Church leaders also wrote to the Welsh Congregation to request an urgent review of lockdown measures against the fire.

The new restrictions consistently prohibit churches in Wales from opening for three Sundays.

The preparatory letter argues that blanket action against Welsh churches is illegal and unnecessary.

The letter states: “The forced closure of churches by the state is an extreme encroachment on the rights of Article 9.

"Such a far-reaching and large-scale intervention can only be justified by the most compelling scientific evidence of resulting public health benefits."

Thousands sign a petition calling on the Welsh government to lift the ban on buying non-essential goods

Thousands of people have signed a petition calling on the Welsh Government to lift a ban on supermarkets selling non-essential items during the fire lockdown in Wales.

First Secretary Mark Drakeford said the restriction is a "matter of fairness" as non-essential retail stores will have to close during the two-week period that started at 6pm on Friday and will last until November 9th.

The guidelines published by the Welsh Government state that certain areas of supermarkets must be "cordoned off or emptied and closed to the public".

These include areas that sell electrical appliances, telephones, clothing, toys and games, garden products, and special areas for housewares.

Supplies for the "essential upkeep, maintenance and function of the household" such as batteries, light bulbs and rubber gloves can be sold during the lockdown.

Images posted on social media showed corridors where items such as children's clothing, greeting cards and books were blocked. Plastic sheeting has been placed over items to prevent buyers from accessing them.

A petition calling on the Welsh government to allow supermarkets to sell non-essential items had received more than 17,000 signatures by Saturday afternoon.

"We disagree that this is a prudent or rational measure and that it will cause more harm than good," the petition said.

“For example, we disagree that parents should be prevented from buying clothes for their children while they are blocked from shopping.

"This is disproportionate and cruel and we demand that the decision be reversed immediately."

Church leaders, who work in some of the most deprived areas of Wales, recognized the severity of the Covid-19 pandemic.

However, they argued that putting appropriate measures in place against pandemics should be a matter for the church rather than the secular authorities.

The group said they were open to a constructive dialogue with the Welsh Assembly but warned against seeking a judicial review if the matter is not addressed urgently.

English church leaders have also signed the letter, concerned that the forced closure of churches in Wales would set a precedent for England to follow.

Rev. Peter Greasley, senior pastor in Christchurch, Newport, said: “It is important that a church serving on the front lines of a ward can meet and worship together.

“We have served the people of Newport and beyond, materially, emotionally and spiritually for 25 years.

“We run the Newport Foodbank, which the local people urgently need at the moment. We also work extensively with the social services, police and local health authorities who use our facilities at reduced cost. If our church cannot function properly, neither can these important ministries.

“We are particularly concerned that this decision by the Welsh Assembly does not recognize the importance of spiritual well-being for a community.

"With this letter, we urge those responsible to reconsider church closings and recognize the critical role churches play in the ward across Wales and the rest of the UK."

Andrea Williams, executive director of the Christian Legal Center, which supports the group, added: “In the face of a crisis, the answer is not to shut down churches that provide the safe havens in our congregations in the UK countries.

“Churches are often the glue that holds our communities together. Often there are places where the weakest in our society and those injured by Covid can find community and hope.

“Closing the churches means closing the places of refuge and rescue in our society. The Welsh Government needs to think again, understand the role of their churches and allow them to be open. & # 39;

Meanwhile, police last night announced extraordinary plans to patrol the Anglo-Welsh border to prevent families from crossing for a half-time vacation.

Officials will try to deter caravans from sneaking into England from Wales and prevent Welsh motorists from defying First Minister Mark Drakeford's "power-mad" orders to make "non-essential" trips.

Cars traveling from England to Wales on the M4 motorway near Rogiet as the two-week lockdown to "fire breakers" begins

Cars traveling from England to Wales on the M4 motorway near Rogiet as the two-week lockdown to "fire breakers" begins

Traffic on the A494 on the Anglo-Welsh border in Queensferry to Wales is blocking the country

Traffic on the A494 on the Anglo-Welsh border in Queensferry to Wales is blocking the country

Police officers were in Cardiff city center tonight when Wales entered a 17-day "fire safety" lockdown at 6pm

Police officers were in Cardiff city center tonight when Wales launched a 17-day fire lockdown at 6pm

A moving graph shows the coronavirus infection rate in Wales for the week of October 5th to 11th

A moving graph shows the coronavirus infection rate in Wales for the week of October 5th to 11th

A moving graph shows the coronavirus infection rate in Wales for the week of October 12-18

A moving graph shows the coronavirus infection rate in Wales for the week of October 12-18

Gloucestershire Police also announced an operation covering stretches from Wales into the Forest of Dean where officials will prevent motorists from traveling to England to find out what they are doing.

Drivers will be asked to turn around and return to Wales if officials "are not satisfied with their explanation," a spokesman said. If they refuse, the police will notify the armed forces in Wales so they can impose fines.

But drivers crossed the border yesterday on the A494 in Queensferry and on the A5445 between Chester and Wrexham in a violation of the new restrictions.

Mr Drakeford has threatened to use license plate recognition cameras to punish English drivers entering his country.

His appeal was confirmed by Scotland's first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, who threatened to introduce a similar travel ban across Scotland to discourage people from traveling from virus hotspots in England.

The SAGE files: Papers submitted to the government claim Covid-19 is mutating, London sees no increase in cases and patients die faster in the second wave than in the first

Scientific advisors have been warned that the coronavirus could become mutated and more contagious, according to SAGE articles published yesterday.

NERVTAG (New and Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group) said the UK is unable to study these mutations in depth and whether they are harmful.

It is one of several papers released by the government yesterday that provides some insight into how scientists are managing the pandemic.

The idea was explored in a scientific report submitted to the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies (SAGE), which then submits the results to the government for information on health policy.

Another document shows, as scientists have found, that London has so far avoided a “second wave” of the magnitude that happens in other major English cities such as Liverpool and Manchester.

Experts speculate that this is due to the fact that a larger part of the capital's population has immunity to the coronavirus after it was already there, compared to the northwest, which did not have infections as high as London in the first wave.

Data shows that Covid 19 patients die faster in hospital than the first time – an average of one week instead of two. This may be because treatment has improved, and therefore doctors can save the lives of people who are not as sick and usually take longer to die, which increases the average time.

However, the Federation of Police of England and Wales has determined that the ban is "unenforceable". Additional police work, which "is already overloaded due to the pandemic", would be made more difficult by the measure.

A spokesman for Gloucestershire Constabulary said: “While we cannot fine those who travel to the county from Wales, we can inform the hosts of those we are stopping to see what happened so they can take action can.

Officials will be conducting an operation over the weekend that will cover stretches from Wales into the Forest of Dean. If we prevent someone from traveling from Wales we will work with them to find out why, explain the legislation and encourage them to turn around if we are not satisfied with their explanation.

The spokesman added, "If you don't turn around, we will notify the force monitoring the area you have traveled from so that they can issue a fine.

"It's important to stress that the vast majority of people abide by the rules, but in line with our police approach, we will take action when there are obvious violations."

He emphasized: “There are no checkpoints. The officers spend some time on the main routes into the forest, stopping vehicles if there are concerns that the vehicle has traveled a distance. You won't stop every vehicle. & # 39;

Anyone who refuses to pay can be tried and convicted with a criminal record.

The North Wales Police announced additional patrols and "increased visibility" throughout the area over the weekend.

On behalf of the four Welsh Police Forces, Interim Deputy Superintendent Nigel Harrison of the North Wales Police Department said: “People should not travel between areas with local restrictions without well-defined excuses.

'Dies schließt diejenigen ein, die aus anderen Teilen des Vereinigten Königreichs mit hohen Übertragungsraten reisen.

„Wenn Sie in Wales in einem nicht eingeschränkten Gebiet leben, dürfen Sie Wales nicht verlassen, um mit hohen Übertragungsraten in andere Gebiete Großbritanniens zu reisen – wiederum ohne eine vernünftige Entschuldigung.

"Alle Maßnahmen, die wir ergreifen, und die Anstrengungen, die wir unternehmen, werden darauf abzielen, die Ausbreitung des Virus zu begrenzen und uns allen dabei zu helfen, unsere Angehörigen, unsere Gemeinschaften und unseren lebenswichtigen Gesundheitsdienst zu schützen."

Beide Streitkräfte sagten, sie würden keine Offiziere einsetzen, um routinemäßig die Grenze zu patrouillieren, und nicht alle Fahrzeuge, die sie überqueren, würden angehalten. Autofahrer sollten jedoch mit einer verstärkten Polizeipräsenz rechnen.

Die Beamten werden nach Fahrzeugen wie Wohnwagen oder Personen Ausschau halten, die Vergnügungsboote ziehen und möglicherweise gegen die Regeln verstoßen.

Chief Inspector Jeff Moses teilte dem Wirtschafts- und Kontrollausschuss des Conwy Council diese Woche mit, dass die Beamten damit rechnen würden, viele Wohnwagen auf der A55 zu sehen, wenn die Leute versuchen, die neuen Beschränkungen zu überwinden.

"Wir sind uns bewusst und erwarten, dass am Freitagnachmittag Wohnwagen über die A55 fliegen", sagte er. "Es wird also einige Maßnahmen geben, um dem entgegenzuwirken." Leider bin ich mir sicher, dass es viele Leute geben wird, die versuchen, nach Wales zu kommen.

"Im Hintergrund wird viel gearbeitet, wie Sie sicher wissen." Die Polizei von Gwent hat außerdem zugesagt, zusätzliche Patrouillen im gesamten Einsatzgebiet durchzuführen.

Ein Sprecher sagte jedoch, der Schwerpunkt werde auf der „Auseinandersetzung mit der Gemeinschaft“ liegen, anstatt gezielt an der Grenze zu patrouillieren.

Der vorübergehende stellvertretende Polizeichef Ian Roberts sagte: "In Gwent werden wir zusätzliche Patrouillen durchführen, insbesondere während der Halloween- und Bonfire Night-Zeit."

Es kommt, als Supermarktmitarbeiter Wasserkocher und Telefonladegeräte in den Regalen vertuschten, als Herr Drakeford den Verkauf von "nicht wesentlichen" Gegenständen während der Coronavirus-Brandschutzsperre des Landes verbot.

Die Mitarbeiter von Tesco und Lidl wurden zu Wales 'erster "Trolley-Polizei", da sie Regale mit "nicht wesentlichen" Produkten hinter Plastikfolien versteckten, um die Kunden davon abzuhalten, sie vor Beginn der Beschränkungen zu kaufen, die heute Abend eingeführt wurden.

Plastic barriers and stacks of beverage crates were also set up to block off certain aisles, while other items were taped off by staff to comply with the draconian new rules.

In other major supermarkets, Sainsbury's staff worked around the clock to make changes while Waitrose reviewed government guidelines and Asda claimed it had "very little time" to implement the new rules.

Nicht wesentliche Gänge in Asda bei Coryton, Cardiff, wurden um 18 Uhr gesperrt, um die Regeln für die Sperrung von Feuerbrüchen einzuhalten

Nicht wesentliche Gänge in Asda in Coryton, Cardiff, wurden um 18 Uhr gesperrt, um die Regeln für die Sperrung von Feuerbrüchen einzuhalten

Kinderkleidung wurde in Zellophan eingewickelt, da sie nach den neuen Bestimmungen zur Sperrung von Brandschutzmitteln nicht verkauft werden kann

Kinderkleidung wurde in Zellophan eingewickelt, da sie nach den neuen Bestimmungen zur Sperrung von Brandschutzmitteln nicht verkauft werden kann

Crates of beverages have been used to cordon off non-essential aisles in the Tesco store in Cardiff to comply with the new rules

Crates of beverages have been used to cordon off non-essential aisles in the Tesco store in Cardiff to comply with the new rules

Die Mitarbeiter klebten Produkte wie Bettdecken in Tescos Laden in Pontypool mit einem Schild mit der Aufschrift: "Leider können wir diese Artikel aufgrund staatlicher Richtlinien erst am 9. November verkaufen."

Die Mitarbeiter klebten Produkte wie Bettdecken in Tescos Laden in Pontypool mit einem Schild mit der Aufschrift: "Leider können wir diese Artikel aufgrund staatlicher Richtlinien erst am 9. November verkaufen."

In einem Tesco-Supermarkt in Swansea wurde eine Barriere errichtet, da Supermärkte angewiesen werden, den Verkauf nicht wesentlicher Waren einzustellen

In einem Tesco-Supermarkt in Swansea wurde eine Barriere errichtet, da Supermärkte angewiesen werden, den Verkauf nicht wesentlicher Waren einzustellen

Four employees at a Tesco store in Pontypool could be seen inspecting the cover-up for a 20-minute test run before the latest restrictions went into effect. Witnesses admitted they had never seen anything like it.

Mr Drakeford described preventing supermarkets from selling non-essential products during the fire lock as "a simple matter of fairness".

Der Gewerkschaftsführer von Wales konnte seine Frustration nicht verbergen, als er wiederholt zu den Beschränkungen befragt wurde, die nun seit 17 Tagen in Kraft sind. He said they were "fair" and crucial in stopping the virus from spreading.

He told a press conference in Cardiff that any suggestion that the ban announced Thursday was based on his own policy was "nonsensical".

WIE HABEN SICH INFEKTIONEN BEI WALES GEÄNDERT?

Wales hat den Auslöser für eine 17-tägige "Brandschutz" -Sperre gedrückt, nachdem sich die durchschnittlichen täglichen Infektionen in einem Monat mehr als verdreifacht hatten.

Der gleitende Sieben-Tage-Durchschnitt, der als genauestes Maß für Ausbrüche angesehen wird, da er die täglichen Schwankungen berücksichtigt, lag am 23. September bei 238.

Derzeit liegt sie bei 894, wie die Analyse der Zahlen von Public Health Wales zeigt.

Die wöchentliche Infektionsrate pro 100.000 in Wales ist in einer Woche ebenfalls um fast ein Viertel gestiegen.

Es liegt derzeit bei 199,2, nachdem es am vergangenen Freitag von 160,6 gestiegen war.

Die Rate von 199,2 pro 100.000 ist erheblich höher als die von Schottland mit 161,2, liegt aber immer noch unter der von England mit 213,6.

Nordirland – mit 1,8 Millionen die kleinste Bevölkerung in Großbritannien – weist mit 378,6 die höchste Rate der Heimatländer auf.

Um ein Gefühl dafür zu bekommen, wie schnell die Krise in Wales gewachsen ist, wurden im August nur 3,7 Fälle pro 100.000 pro Woche registriert, der niedrigste in Großbritannien.

Die 761 neuen Fälle der Nation gestern haben die Anzahl der bestätigten Fälle auf 40.253 erhöht.

Ein Viertel davon wurde in den letzten vierzehn Tagen aufgezeichnet.

Seit dem 11. September gab es 10.625 Fälle – obwohl die wahre Zahl als viel höher angesehen wird, weil so viele Menschen asymptomatisch sind oder nicht getestet werden.

He said: “We are asking hundreds of small businesses to close on the main road across Wales.

“We can't do that and then allow supermarkets to sell goods that these people can't sell.

“And we try to minimize the time people spend outside their homes in that two-week period.

"This is not the time to go shopping for non-essential items in supermarkets."

He said trying to find exemptions from the rules was "just the wrong" approach and urged the people of Wales not to use the ceasefire to do things they don't have to.

"It's a simple matter of fairness – we're here in Wales together," he added.

He was slammed for the stance by TV host Kay Burley who argued that her hairdryer was a necessary item, despite the Welsh leader claiming it classed as a 'non-essential' item.

Supermarket customers in Wales yesterday claimed the sale of duvets, bedding and electricals had been stopped by Tesco staff who covered the shelves in plastic.

Tesco customer Jamie Cole, 31, said the aisle with kettles and phone chargers is also "completely closed" despite being "needed" as temperatures gradually drop across the country.

Mr. Cole said, “I was shocked, it's pretty bad. Bedding should be available for children and mothers. We're coming into winter, it's cold outside, I couldn't believe it.

“I don't have children of my own, but my girlfriend and sister have children, she's also pretty shocked. You rely on Tesco as it is the only supermarket in our town.

“That was at 10:49 am today, the restrictions won't come into effect until 6 pm and all other supermarkets are fine. The employees only follow orders, it happened so quickly. They just announced it around 7pm last night.

“I'm 30 years old and I've never seen anything like it in my life. You follow the rules then do this, it's pretty intimidating. There was another corridor that was also completely closed, namely the stationery corridor and the electrical system.

“If you needed a kettle or a phone charger, this aisle was completely closed. I've done some homework and there isn't a key items list on the Wales government website.

"I think it's the supermarket that decides which items are important."

A Tesco spokesperson confirmed to MailOnline: "Our colleagues across Wales will be working incredibly hard today to comply with the Welsh government's ban on selling" nonessential "goods to our customers from 6pm this evening."

It came after Mr Drakeford snapped as he was roasted over his ban on the shops selling the items in his lockdown.

The Labor First Minister couldn't hide his frustration when asked repeatedly about the restrictions, which went into effect at 6 p.m. for 17 days.

He insisted that they were "fair" and crucial in stopping the virus from spreading.

However, when asked if it was “imperative” for parents to buy new school pants if their kids tear them up, Drakeford groaned, “It's just the wrong way to approach this whole business.

"We're back to the approach of how to bypass the rules for coronavirus."

A road sign in the Welsh capital of Cardiff advised people that the new firebreak lockdown would begin at 6pm on Friday

A road sign in the Welsh capital of Cardiff advised people that the new firebreak lockdown would begin at 6pm on Friday

A worker closes the front gate to a bar on St. Mary Street in Cardiff as the new lockdown rules came into effect at 6pm

A worker closes the front gate to a bar on St. Mary Street in Cardiff as the new lockdown rules came into effect at 6pm

Staff pack up tables and chairs outside a bar in the centre of Cardiff in order to abide by the new lockdown restrictions

Staff pack up tables and chairs outside a bar in the centre of Cardiff in order to abide by the new lockdown restrictions

Cars at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey amid tightened coronavirus restrictions

Cars at the border crossing between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, as gardai conduct checks asking people the reason for their journey amid tightened coronavirus restrictions

He added irritably, "There is a greater price at stake here than whether or not you have to buy a candle."

Mr Drakeford insisted that it was unacceptable to allow supermarkets to continue selling clothing and other products while smaller retailers were closed.

"We're all here in Wales together," he said at a press conference in Cardiff.

"This is no time to go shopping for non-essential items in supermarkets."

However, anger rose as Welsh health minister Vaughan Gething made clear alcohol does count as a key item under the confusing new rules – but insisted hair dryers do not.

He also acknowledged that a "line by line" list of products sold was "unusable" and hoped retailers would have an "adult understanding".

Welsh lockdown rules

  • Supermarkets can only sell "essential items".
  • Pubs and restaurants closed
  • Only leave the house to buy groceries, medication, or play sports
  • Household mix indoors and outdoors prohibited
  • Most secondary school children will stay at home
  • Work from home wherever possible
  • Wear face masks indoors and on public transportation

There are fears that this will mark a return to the scenes seen at the start of the pandemic, when there was controversy over the contents of people's shopping carts.

Mr Drakeford said this afternoon that local restrictions have managed to contain the spread of the virus but not "turn it back".

He compared the progress like Torfaen positively to areas in England like Oldham. But he said the "brief sharp shock" of a lockdown was now essential.

"We need to act now because the virus is rising too quickly," he said.

Many retailers will be forced to close completely during the "fire safety" lockdown, but grocery stores and pharmacies can remain open.

During a bruised interview with Kay Burley on Sky News, Mr Gething said the Welsh government was producing "categories" that could be sold.

"A supermarket that sells clothes is not essential. We want them to understand what they can do so that they can do that."

He added, “We don't want to go line by line through thousands of product items. That would be useless from their and our point of view, ”he said.

Burley asked if the situation meant alcohol was essential but a hair dryer was not.

"Well, look, food and drink are things we had in the first phase of the pandemic. They're available everywhere," Gething replied.

When the moderator insisted, "Trust me, my hair dryer is important," Mr. Gething replied, "No, it isn't, Kay."

Burley said, 'Of course it is. Look at the condition of your hair compared to mine. I need to dry my hair, you can towel dry yours. & # 39;

But Mr Gething replied, "I don't think the biggest problem on people's minds in Wales is going to be whether they can buy a hair dryer for the next two weeks."

With police given powers to take action against drivers heading into Wales from England, the Garda are back on the Irish border and carrying out checks on drivers after the highest-level lockdowns were imposed on both sides of the frontier.

The hard line taken in Wales was mercilessly mocked by social media users who created memes to rib the new regulations

The hard line taken in Wales was mercilessly mocked by social media users who created memes to rib the new regulations

Irish police have not carried out such stringent checks on drivers from Ulster since the days of the Troubles when the IRA moved guns and explosives into the war-torn province.

Now they are on the lookout for people making non-essential journeys, after the Republic this week imposed swingeing Level 5 restrictions which ban people from travelling more than three miles (5km) from their home.

Stormont has asked citizens not to make 'unnecessary travel,' but Dublin's measures are more aggressive.

On Wednesday night, when Ireland's new six-week national lockdown began, gardai were given new powers by Dublin to prosecute people making non-essential travel, with fines of up to €2,500 and jail for up to six months.

The firebreak lockdown has sparked anger among opposition figures, with Welsh Conservative Andrew RT Davies tweeting: 'The power is going to their heads'.

Bacteriologist says restaurant and pub closures across Scotland and Wales are NOT backed by 'sound evidence'

Pub and restaurant closures across Scotland and Wales are not backed by 'sound evidence', according to a top academic.

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon yesterday unveiled her nation's new tiered lockdown approach while Wales began a 17-day 'firebreak' at 6pm this evening.

The rules mean the shutters are coming down on many sections of the high street in both countries, however Hugh Pennington, professor of bacteriology at the University of Aberdeen, said he is frustrated by the lack of information being used to support the shutdown.

It comes after hospitality groups signalled their intention to take legal action against the Government.

The Scottish Beer and Pub Association, The Scottish Licensed Trade Association, UK Hospitality (Scotland), the Scottish Hospitality Group and the Night Time Industries Association Scotland are all pursuing action.

They said there is 'no sound evidence' to support bar and restaurant closures, which were extended yesterday for another week in the Central Belt.

Prof Pennington said he understands the hospitality groups' decision to pursue legal action.

He said: 'I can see where they are coming from.

'I can see why they want to see more data.

'I think those of us who are not involved in the government machine would like to see that data.

'I've been quite frustrated by the low level of information about outbreaks and the evidence that is being used.

'What the hospitality industry want to see is the evidence that is driving the policy.

'There is evidence from the international scene, we know there have been outbreaks in pubs and of course there was the Aberdeen outbreak.

'But what I haven't seen and what the hospitality industry will be very keen to see is if there has been a detailed study of an outbreak.

'One can do quite sophisticated analysis quite quickly and I haven't seen that data.

'And if there is evidence, then the hospitality industry can accept, well that's why you are coming down so heavily on us.'

The lockdown is considerably more severe than the three-tier system in England. Wales is calling for people to stay at home except for limited purposes such as sports and the complete closure of pubs, restaurants, hotels and non-essential shops.

This week a travel ban for hotspot areas in England to Wales was passed despite the Police Federation calling it "unenforceable".

In contrast, even in England's strictest Tier 3 areas, some outdoor social gatherings are allowed, and pubs can stay open provided they offer customers a "full meal".

As a result, revellers took to the streets of Cardiff city centre last night to enjoy one blast on the town before the new restrictions came into force.

In Scotland, Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon also wants to go tougher than the Prime Minister, with more curbs, to tackle the pandemic, despite downplaying claims by a top adviser that families should prepare to see loved ones over for Christmas Zoom to see the ongoing crisis.

Mr Drakeford said it was "made clear" to supermarkets that only certain parts of their stores could be opened to sell essentials.

Retailers were given mere hours to put together plans for the lockdown, which will run until November 9, as shopkeepers argue the rules do not make sense as customers will already be in their stores to buy the 'essential' items.

Mr Drakeford made the announcement on a Senedd committee in response to a question from conservative MS Russell George who said it was "unfair" to force independent clothing and hardware retailers to close while similar goods are being sold in large supermarkets .

"At the first restrictions, people understood to some extent that supermarkets weren't closing all of the things they might have needed," Drakeford said.

'I don't think that people will be as understanding this time and we will be making it clear to supermarkets that they are only able to open those parts of their business that provide essential goods to people and that will not include some of the things that Russell George mentioned which other people are prevented from selling.

"So we're going to make sure there is a level playing field for the next two weeks."

Starting Friday, all leisure and non-essential retail stores will be closed, including clothing stores, furniture stores, and car dealerships. A full list has yet to be published.

Shops that are allowed to remain open include supermarkets and other grocery stores, pharmacies, banks, and post offices.

Nach dem Gesetz dürfen Firmen, die ein Geschäft betreiben, das eine gemischte Reihe von Diensten anbietet, eröffnen, wenn sie die Dienste einstellen, die geschlossen werden müssen.

Mr George said: “It is deeply worrying that given that we are only days from the lockdown, we are still waiting for a full list of the types of businesses to shut down and guidance to be published Business closures.

“At a time of considerable uncertainty, it is totally unacceptable, intentionally or not, to arouse even more concern and concern, which this government unfortunately manages.

“The people and businesses of Wales deserve better than to be left in the dark. In order to safeguard people's jobs and livelihoods, I urge the Welsh Labor Government to heed our demands and publish a list immediately. & # 39;

Andrew RT Davies, the Conservative shadow health secretary, tweeted, "The power goes into their heads."

He later added, “Is a Strongbow pitcher considered essential? What about much-needed panties when you run short?

"I hope there are some published guidelines on what the Labor Commissioners think is essential."

Sue Davies of consumer group Which? Said the announcement would create "confusion", especially among the vulnerable.

"Unsere eigenen Untersuchungen haben gezeigt, dass fast die Hälfte derjenigen, die sich während der vorherigen Sperrung in Wales als situativ anfällig bezeichneten, Schwierigkeiten hatten, auf die benötigten Lebensmittel und Lebensmittel zuzugreifen", sagte sie.

“The Welsh Government must act now to resolve the situation where retailers can and cannot sell, and urgently identify those who need support most to ensure that no one at risk is in trouble To get access to groceries and other basics you need. '

The First Minister said he would keep the principality closed down for as short a time as possible, but insisted it was necessary to act as a breaker to a 'rising tide' of cases – despite Wales having a lower rate of infections than England.

The decision to impose a "short and deep" lockdown by November 9th, reflecting Sir Keir Starmer's national demands and wiping out Halloween and Bonfire Night, sparked angry political backlash.

Data showed England had a coronavirus infection rate of 166 per 100,000 people in the week of October 14 while Wales had a rate of 163 per 100,000.

Welsh Tories said it would doom the country to an endless cycle of two-week lockdowns, while Conservative MPs in Westminster said it was a "blunt instrument" and "the closure of all of Wales is disproportionate to the risk in some parts of the country. " Country & # 39 ;.

Department of Health data shows how weekly infection rates vary across Wales. Areas in dark blue diagnosed at least 200 cases for every 100,000 people living there in the week ending October 18. Light blue shows a rate of between 101 and 200. Areas in dark green saw between 51 and 100 cases for every 100,000 people, while those in light green saw between 11 and 50 positive tests for the same amount of people.

Department of Health data shows how weekly infection rates vary across Wales. Areas in dark blue diagnosed at least 200 cases for every 100,000 people living there in the week ending October 18. Light blue shows a rate of between 101 and 200. Areas in dark green saw between 51 and 100 cases for every 100,000 people, while those in light green saw between 11 and 50 positive tests for the same amount of people.

A graph shows how the number of coronavirus cases in Wales has increased since late August, but less in recent days

A graph shows how the number of coronavirus cases in Wales has increased since late August, but less in recent days

A graph shows how coronavirus hospital admissions in Wales have increased in the past few days but not skyrocketed

A graph shows how coronavirus hospital admissions in Wales have increased in the past few days but not skyrocketed

A graph shows how coronavirus deaths have increased in Wales since late August, but less in recent days

A graph shows how coronavirus deaths have increased in Wales since late August, but less in recent days

Sara Jones, director of the Welsh Retail Consortium, said: "It is ill-conceived and short-sighted to force retailers to stop selling certain items without being clearly told what can and cannot be sold."

And James Lowman, head of the Association of Convenience Stores, added, "Retailers must not be forced to stop making products available to customers just because ministers do not consider them essential."

A Welsh Government spokesman said: 'The fire-break is designed to reduce all physical contact between households to an absolute minimum in order to slow the spread of coronavirus and save lives.

“We have a small window in which to take these actions and there are no easy decisions.

"However, we are fully aware of the impact fire fighting is having on businesses and we are providing an additional £ 300 million to support them through this difficult time."

At the start of the pandemic, hordes of shoppers came to supermarkets at dawn to stock up on cleared grocery aisles across the country after weeks of panic buying.

Demands from the government and retailers to consider other people and avoid panic buying have been largely ignored. Those who showed restraint had to flock to stores well before opening hours to make sure they didn't leave empty-handed.

Individual stores have taken steps to limit the number of products people could buy, while police and private security guards have even been drafted to stamp out searches of high-demand items like toilet paper.

Mr Drakeford said this week, “It is a very difficult time indeed and that is why we ultimately chose the shortest possible length of time for a fire to break out – a period of two weeks.

“But if you make it short, you have to make it deep. There is a compromise.

'We could have gone for a longer period with slightly fewer restrictions but, in the end, the advice to us – partly because of the impact on people's mental health – was that if you could keep this period of time as short as you could, that would help to mitigate that impact.'

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) messages