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Red rashes in the mouth could be a new symptom of the coronavirus, the study said


Red rashes in the mouth could be a new symptom of the coronavirus, according to a Spanish study

  • The researchers examined 21 patients in a hospital in Madrid, Spain who had rashes and confirmed cases of coronavirus
  • A third of the patients had an enanthema, which are rashes that usually form in the mouth
  • All rash patients were between 40 and 69 years old and four of the six were female

According to a new study, mouth lesions and spots on the palate could be a new symptom of the novel coronavirus.

The researchers found that a third of COVID-19 patients with rashes on their arms and legs also had eruptions on the roofs of their mouth.

In addition, these spots usually appeared about two weeks after the first appearance of known symptoms such as fever or shortness of breath.

The team at the Ramon y Cajal University Hospital in Madrid, Spain, says doctors and nurses should examine the mouths of confirmed or suspected coronavirus patients to see if they show these signs.

A new study from Spain found that a third of coronavirus rash patients had an enanthem, which is rash that usually forms in the mouth (top).

All rash patients were between 40 and 69 years old and four of the six were female. Pictured: the rash on the outside of a coronavirus patient's body

All rash patients were between 40 and 69 years old and four of the six were female. Pictured: the rash on the outside of a coronavirus patient's body

At the beginning of the pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded only three symptoms of the virus on their website: fever, cough and shortness of breath.

In April, however, the Federal Health Office expanded its list to include several other signs of infection, including chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, and new taste or odor loss.

Health officials have said that if you learn more about the new virus, new symptoms may appear.

For the study published in JAMA Dermatology, the team examined 21 coronavirus patients in a hospital that had a rash from March 30 to April 8.

Six patients had an enanthem, a rash that looks like small patches that typically appear in the mucous membranes such as the mouth, nose, and throat.

The average time between the appearance of classic symptoms such as cough and these lesions was approximately 12 days.

All were between 40 and 69 years old, and four of the six were female, suggesting that this symptom could affect certain subgroups of patients.

The team says this is not the first time that an enanthem has been observed in COVID-19 patients. Rash reports have been recorded in Italy.

"Despite the increasing reports of rashes in patients with COVID-19, it is difficult to make an etiological diagnosis," the authors wrote.

& # 39; However, the presence of enanthem is a strong indication that indicates a viral etiology rather than a drug reaction, especially when a petechiae pattern is observed. & # 39;

The researchers found that many coronavirus patients do not have their mouth examined for safety reasons because they expel infected droplets.

Because of this, and due to the fact that patients often wear masks, it is possible that hundreds more had mouth lesions.

The results are reminiscent of an April report in which another group of Spanish scientists found that lesions and bruises on the toes were related to the virus.

There are more than 3.7 million confirmed cases of the virus and more than 140,000 deaths in the United States.

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(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Health (t) Coronavirus (t) Spain