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Rebel Tories "meet today to speak with Labor about bundling curfew for the 10pm pub"


According to reports, Rebel Tories could team up with Labor to end Boris Johnson's 10pm Covid curfew.

The group, made up of dozens of Conservative MPs, is reportedly seeking final orders on the unpopular bar curfew – which led to numerous mass gatherings at the time of the kick-out as revelers took to the streets together.

The Tory backbenchers hope to vote on it Wednesday and will meet today to discuss plans to team up with Labor to say so, the Telegraph said.

It comes after Chancellor Rishi Sunak yesterday expressed his frustration with the measures – which gives new hope to the rebel Conservatives.

The group was also strengthened after Labor delayed curfew until the opposition saw the evidence, the newspaper said.

Workers are not expected to decide whether to vote until the day of the vote in order to proceed with the 10pm cutoff.

Rebel Tories could team up with Labor to end Boris Johnson's (pictured) Covid curfew at 10 p.m.

The group, made up of dozens of Conservative MPs, is reportedly seeking final orders over the unpopular curfew on pubs. This has led to numerous mass gatherings at the kick-off point when night owls took to the streets together (Image: Revelers leave the pubs in Liverpool)

The group, which is made up of dozens of conservative MPs, supposedly wants to get the final orders on the unpopular curfew for pubs – which led to numerous mass gatherings at the time of the kick-out when night owls took to the streets together (Photo: Revelers leave the pubs ) in Liverpool)

The anti-curfew tories are in high demand a week after a conservative uprising that forces the government to allow MPs to vote on a future national lockdown.

Ministers are required to give MPs a simple yes or no to new restrictions weeks after their introduction.

One told the Telegraph, "In my opinion, a significant number of MPs could be voting around 10 p.m."

Another rebel said that if Labor opposed the curfew, there would be enough Conservatives joining Sir Keir Starmer's party to defeat the government.

Former Brexit minister Steve Baker, who played a role as ringleader in the vote on a lockdown, told the Telegraph: “Very few MPs have constituencies that can vote against any violation of liberty.

“However, there is a growing consensus that neither the 10pm curfew nor the inclusion of children in the 'Rule of Six' is well documented.

"I expect some MEPs to question these two points."

The talk of the rebellion comes after Rishi Sunak and Boris Johnson built a united front yesterday after the Chancellor called the 10pm pubs curfew "frustrating" and insisted that he "Eat Out to Help Out" – Program "not regretted".

The two politicians were pictured together visiting an energy company after Mr Sunak vigorously defended his restaurant subsidies – despite the prime minister admitting they may have contributed to the surge in coronavirus cases.

In an interview prior to his keynote address at the Tory conference, Sunak said the program created two million jobs.

He cemented his status as the cabinet's leading “hawk” on the need to get the economy going again, telling The Sun, “I don't think it is wrong for people to seek normalcy, and I do don't think it's wrong the government wants this for the people. & # 39;

The talk of the rebellion comes after Rishi Sunak (pictured) and Boris Johnson built a united front yesterday after the Chancellor declared the 10pm pubs curfew as "frustrating" and insisted that he "eat out to." Help Out "program" I have "not regretted"

The talk of the rebellion comes after Rishi Sunak (pictured) and Boris Johnson built a united front yesterday after the Chancellor declared the 10pm pubs curfew as "frustrating" and insisted that he "eat out to." Help Out "program" I have "not regretted"

The two politicians were pictured together (above) visiting an energy company after Mr Sunak vigorously defended his restaurant subsidies - despite the Prime Minister admitting they may have contributed to the surge in coronavirus cases

The two politicians were pictured together (above) visiting an energy company after Mr Sunak vigorously defended his restaurant subsidies – despite the prime minister admitting they may have contributed to the surge in coronavirus cases

The intervention came after Mr Johnson was heavily questioned about his management of the crisis, criticizing chaotic local lockdowns and shambolic testing. He admitted yesterday that he dropped his "lively" style during the pandemic because it was "inappropriate".

In contrast, Mr. Sunak was praised for his tone of voice, speaking about the effects of the disease and the speed with which complicated rescue operations, including vacations, were carried out.

Mr Johnson tried yesterday to bridge the apparent gap between their messages by saying he wanted the public to be "fearless but use common sense".

Mr Sunak was named Dishi Rishi after launching his subsidized meal plan in August to help a pub and restaurant sector hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic.

Treasury Department figures show that more than 100 million meals were eaten under the program, giving guests a 50 percent government-sponsored discount up to a maximum of £ 10 on meals every Monday through Wednesday in August.

Mr Johnson told BBC One's Andrew Marr Show yesterday that the Treasury Department's incentive "may have contributed to the spread of the virus".

However, in his interview, Sunak said the initiative's success helped create two million jobs, and he has no regrets paying for it.

"No, definitely not," said Mr. Sunak when asked if he had any regrets.

“We had an industry that is very close to my heart because of the job. There are over two million people. & # 39;

Mr Sunak pointed to the low rate of second wave Covid infection in the southwest, an area he claimed made the most use of the system, as evidence that the hospitality action had no adverse health effects .

The nondrinker also expressed his sympathy for public anger over the 10pm curfew, which was put in place to curb infection.

"Everyone is very frustrated and exhausted and tired of all of this," he told the newspaper.

It found that parts of the UK – including a number of university towns – could get into local lockdown within a few days of belated test and trace data revealing belatedly rising infection rates, making the areas over the threshold for one new area were brought three-stage warning system.

Another 33 deaths were announced today as the government is expected to unveil a new system to manage lockdown restrictions nationwide

Another 33 deaths were announced today as the government is expected to unveil a new system to manage lockdown restrictions nationwide

As infections continue to rise, stricter measures could be put in place in some of the UK's hardest hit areas than those that already affect millions

As infections continue to rise, stricter measures could be put in place in some of the UK's hardest hit areas than those that already affect millions

Cities like Sheffield, Leeds and Oxford are among a dozen areas where coronavirus infections rose after the "computer glitch," meaning 16,000 cases were missed from Public Health England's reporting system.

According to the Telegraph, residents of Nottingham, which has two universities, should prepare for lockdown measures.

The city that hosts Nottingham University and Nottingham Trent University was previously not on the government's Covid watch list.

However, the updated data shows that last week the city would have been one of the worst areas in the country compared to the pre-determined numbers.

The Department of Health insists the new numbers won't affect its watchlist or change the current restriction in the region, the paper said.

An additional 12,594 confirmed cases of coronavirus were reported yesterday, bringing the total number of cases in the UK to 515,571 while another 19 people lost their lives.

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