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Queen and Philip receive their Covid-19 vaccinations


The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh received the Covid-19 vaccination today at Windsor Castle, Buckingham Palace.

The 94-year-old monarch and 99-year-old Prince Philip have joined more than 1.5 million people across the UK who have been administered the sting since the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine was approved for use in December.

The UK has since approved the use of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca sting along with a vaccine against the coronavirus developed by Moderna.

The news of the vaccination of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh is unusual at Buckingham Palace, who rarely comment on the royal couple's private health issues.

It is understood that the Queen decided to make the information public to avoid inaccuracies and further speculation.

A Buckingham Palace spokesman said: "The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh received Covid-19 vaccinations today."

However, they refused to indicate which of the two available vaccines the couple received.

The Queen and Duke of Edinburgh received the Covid-19 vaccination today at Windsor Castle, Buckingham Palace

The 94-year-old monarch and 99-year-old Prince Philip have joined more than a million people across the UK who have been administered the sting since the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine was approved for use in December. Pictured: Boris Johnson in London last week

The 94-year-old monarch and 99-year-old Prince Philip have joined more than a million people across the UK who have been administered the sting since the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine was approved for use in December. Pictured: Boris Johnson in London last week

In other coronavirus developments today:

  • Doctors in overwhelmed hospitals need to start "testing" coronavirus patients to decide who is being critically treated.
  • Coronavirus outbreaks in nursing homes have more than doubled in 14 days during the New Year period, according to data.
  • According to an official survey, one in 15 people in the London borough of Barking and Dagenham may have the virus.
  • A new highly contagious variant now makes up 81 percent of the cases in the capital;
  • Senior officials warned of its virulence, which meant the current lockdown would likely contain the virus less effectively than the first.
  • One study suggested that the Pfizer vaccine would work against the new strain.
  • UK regulators approved a third vaccine, but it won't be available until spring.
  • Vaccination Czar Kate Bingham promised to meet the goal of vaccinating the 13 million most at risk by February 15.

A royal source confirmed the injections were given by a family doctor in Windsor Castle.

The Queen and Philip have taken refuge in their Berkshire home after deciding to have a quiet Christmas and forego the traditional royal family gathering in Sandringham.

The royal couple's vaccinations are confirmed a month after British grandmother Margaret Keenan [91] became the first person in the world to receive a Covid-19 vaccination on December 8.

It has since been offered to people over the age of 80 or those at high risk of the virus, with people living or working in nursing homes also topping the list to get the sting.

The news of the vaccination of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh is unusual at Buckingham Palace, who rarely comment on the royal couple's private health issues

The news of the vaccination of the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh is unusual at Buckingham Palace, who rarely comment on the royal couple's private health issues

Boris Johnson announced this week that he would be calling on the army to step up the vaccination campaign as he claimed the NHS would be able to deliver 200,000 thrusts a day by next Friday as part of ambitious plans to end the lockdown.

The UK aims to vaccinate 13 million people by mid-February, which could take up to three million a week.

So far, only 1.5 million have received at least one dose – which means an additional 11.5 million, or around 300,000, will have to be dispensed per day in 39 days.

It is because coronavirus cases continue to rise in the UK, with more than 68,000 infections registered in a single day on Friday. Another 1,325 deaths were confirmed yesterday, up from 613 a week ago.

The death toll, which has doubled in a week, brings Britain to the edge of nearly 80,000. Coronavirus infections reached a record high of 68,053.

Experts fear the daily death toll from rocket falls and hospitalizations will continue to rise.

Royal sources insisted last month that the Queen and Prince Philip would not get preferential treatment for the shock but would instead stand in line during the first wave of injections reserved for those over 80 and nursing home residents.

The Queen's participation in supporting the thrusts could be seen as a rallying call to the nation.

The UK aims to vaccinate 13 million people by mid-February, which could take up to three million a week

The UK aims to vaccinate 13 million people by mid-February, which could take up to three million a week

According to Public Health England, there were 503 reports of Covid-19 outbreaks in nursing homes in England in the week ended January 3, up from 304 the week before

According to Public Health England, there were 503 reports of Covid-19 outbreaks in nursing homes in England in the week ended January 3, up from 304 the week before

In 1957, she announced that Charles and Princess Anne had received blasts of polio to allay fears about the vaccine.

On Christmas Day, she conveyed a message of consolation to everyone who “just wanted a hug” during the Christmas season, telling them: “You are not alone and let me assure you of my thoughts and prayers”.

The Queen spoke of the coming of "light and hope" embodied in the birth of Christ when she delivered her annual Christmas message at a time when many of her subjects are separated from their families due to the pandemic.

Nursing home staff should go to work despite POSITIVE's test for coronavirus

Nursing home staff have been ordered to go to work despite testing positive for coronavirus, an alarming new report revealed on Friday.

In the past 14 days, inspectors have reported more than a dozen nursing homes about infection control problems.

The Care Quality Commission reportedly warned at least 14 households of deficiencies, including asking workers with Covid to work due to staff shortages, the Guardian reported.

This is because the NHS plans to command replacement care beds across the country to ease pressure on hospitals where wards fill with Covid patients as the crisis escalates.

National Care Association chair Nadra Ahmed told BBC Radio 4's Today program that the sector had received calls over Christmas to fill beds in nursing homes.

But she warned, “There's no way vendors can go back to April, when we were told everything was fine and people were being discharged from hospitals.

“Of course we want to help the NHS if we can, but we sure have to do that.

"The only way that can be done safely is if we are absolutely clear that the person is no longer shedding the virus and is bringing it into the nursing service."

And as a tribute to the NHS, the speech featured recordings of workers attending the Clap for our Carers, held every Thursday during the first lockdown, while the NHS best-charted choir performed at the end.

News of the monarch's vaccination follows fears that doctors in overwhelmed hospitals will have to start "testing" coronavirus patients to decide who will receive intensive care.

Medics in London said a critical shortage of beds meant some hospitals were putting in place emergency policies to prioritize treatment for patients with the best chance of survival.

This means that younger patients who are more likely to survive are offered critical care compared to older patients who are less likely to survive.

And ICUs on the UK frontline of Covid are "extremely concerned" that the total number of cases will continue to rise until the NHS "just can't cope" as the UK continues to breach the lockdown.

Data shows that only 30 percent of people with Covid symptoms actually have to stay home, get work, take responsibility, or buy supplies to force them out.

Intensive care adviser Professor Rupert Pearse, who works at the Royal London Hospital in the hardest-hit capital, said the British are not following the rules as if they were "in the first wave" and putting enormous pressure on the already overwhelmed healthcare system.

Dr. Katharina Hauck of Imperial College London Medical School said: “Hospitals in London are overwhelmed, which is a dangerous situation for any patient in need of urgent care … Unfortunately, some hospitals are now being forced to … follow emergency triage of all patients who need intensive care.

“Effective application of these guidelines means that patients under 65 who are not frail have priority care over the elderly and frail patients. Frail patients would be cared for in a general ward with less intensive care. & # 39;

And the vice chairman of the British Medical Association's advisory committee said the recent wave of Covid infections will only get worse.

He said that up to three patients per critical care nurse, critical health services are being "thinly and thinly distributed" rather than the usual standard of individual care.

Elsewhere today it was revealed that the New Year's coronavirus outbreak in nursing homes more than doubled in 14 days after it was found that only 10 percent of residents had been vaccinated.

According to Public Health England, there were 503 reports of Covid-19 outbreaks in nursing homes in England in the week ended January 3, up from 304 the week before.

The previous week it was 236, meaning the infections increased by more than 113 percent in two weeks.

A nursing home outbreak is classified as two or more confirmed cases, meaning the number of residents infected with the virus is even higher.

The Queen, 94, spoke of the coming of "light and hope" embodied in the birth of Christ as she delivered her annual Christmas message at a time when many of her subjects are separated from their families due to the pandemic

The Queen, 94, spoke of the coming of "light and hope" embodied in the birth of Christ as she delivered her annual Christmas message at a time when many of her subjects are separated from their families due to the pandemic

So far, only 1.5 million have received at least one dose - which means an additional 11.5 million, or around 300,000, will have to be dispensed per day in 39 days

So far, only 1.5 million have received at least one dose – which means an additional 11.5 million, or around 300,000, will have to be dispensed per day in 39 days

When the first coronavirus wave peaked in March and April last year, the government was heavily criticized for how nursing homes were affected by the disease – more than 20,000 people died.

The government's vaccination priority list, first released in September, puts nursing home residents and staff among the first to line up for a sting.

But Mr Johnson admitted earlier this week that the vaccination schedule needs to be speeded up as figures show that only one in ten nursing home residents and 14 percent of staff have been vaccinated to date.

Nadra Ahmed, chair of the National Care Association, said the delays were "not good enough" and the government had "failed" the vulnerable residents of care homes.

Pictured: Ellen Prosser, known as Nell, who is 100 years old, receives the Oxford / AstraZeneca COVID-19 COVID-19 vaccine from Dr. Nikki Kanani at the Sunrise Care Home in Sidcup, South East London

Pictured: Ellen Prosser, known as Nell, who is 100 years old, receives the Oxford / AstraZeneca COVID-19 COVID-19 vaccine from Dr. Nikki Kanani at the Sunrise Care Home in Sidcup, South East London

Number 10 blamed complications in obtaining the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine, which must be stored at -70 ° C, responsible for poor progress in vaccinating home residents.

However, the rollout of the Oxford / AstraZeneca sting, which began last week, is believed to speed up the vaccination program as it is easier to store and transport.

The Ministry of Health has announced that vaccines will be offered to all nursing home residents by the end of January.

Ms. Ahmed told the telegraph that the delays were unacceptable.

She said, & # 39; It's not good enough. This time we would have liked to see the statistics more ahead than behind the curve, ”she said.

"If we don't do this, we are failing the vulnerable citizens of this country who are in care facilities, and that will be the government's failure to protect the most vulnerable."