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Putin critic Alexei Navalny is armed under guard in the German hospital


Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny may have been poisoned, tests by German doctors have confirmed.

In a statement from the Berlin Charite hospital, where he is armed, Navalny said he was sick with a cholinesterase inhibitor. The specific substance is unknown and would require further testing.

"The outcome of the disease remains uncertain and long-term consequences, particularly in the nervous system, cannot be ruled out at this point," they said.

Navalny's allies have warned that he could be "incapacitated for months".

The politician, corruption investigator and one of the fiercest opponents of Russian President Vladimir Putin fell ill while on the run from Siberia after allegedly drinking poisoned tea.

Its supporters have accused the Kremlin of coping with its alleged poisoning and experiencing a three-day delay in its transfer to Germany for treatment.

Russian doctors in Siberia have claimed they found "no trace" of poison in his system and decided to attribute the disease to a "metabolic disorder".

The Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny is in a coma, but "stable", the Charite hospital in Berlin has confirmed. In the picture, the politician arrives at the German hospital on August 22nd

It is feared the politician drank poison-infused tea after falling ill on a flight from Siberia to Moscow on Thursday. Above is the last picture of Mr Navalny before he collapsed

It is feared the politician drank poison-infused tea after falling ill on a flight from Siberia to Moscow on Thursday. Above is the last picture of Mr Navalny before he collapsed

For his protection, German police and federal agents are stationed in front of the Charite hospital in the German capital after Merkel has extended her hand of friendship.

Your spokesman Steffen Seibert did not want to comment on Navalny's condition today, but the federal government's coordinator for Eastern European affairs, Dirk Wiese, told the public broadcaster ZDF this morning that he was "currently critical, but stable".

The hospital is treating him with the antidote atropine, but the clinical outcome remains unclear.

Navalny's team filed a request with the Russian authorities last week to open a criminal investigation, but the investigative committee has yet to open the case.

Ilya Yashin, an opposition politician in Moscow and an ally of Navalny, called on law enforcement agencies to investigate "an attempt at a public figure's life" and to include Vladimir Putin in their investigation.

"It is Putin who is profiting from these endless attacks," she said.

Navalny's wife imagined visiting the Charite Hospital in Berlin today

Navalny's wife imagined visiting the Charite Hospital in Berlin today

Navalny's wife arrives at the Charite hospital in Berlin. Angel Merkel's spokesman said today it was "quite likely" that he was poisoned

Navalny's wife arrives at the Charite hospital in Berlin. Angel Merkel's spokesman said today it was "quite likely" that he was poisoned

His followers insist he was poisoned, but doctors in Omsk said a metabolic disorder was the most likely diagnosis. He is pictured on a stretcher in Omsk before his transfer to Germany

His followers insist he was poisoned, but doctors in Omsk said a metabolic disorder was the most likely diagnosis. He is pictured on a stretcher in Omsk before his transfer to Germany

Russian doctors at the Siberian hospital where he was treated today denied claims that they were pressured into finding no trace of toxins in his system.

Chief Medical Officer Alexander Murakhovsky's office was full of police officers and plainclothes officers, according to journalists, when Navalny was taken to Omsk Emergency Hospital No.1.

"I can't tell you who they were," said the chief doctor. “I had a lot of people in my office, after all (Navalny) is a political figure.

“I can't say you did anything. They just came and asked what was going on. & # 39;

He further denied allegations that hospital authorities were on loan from the Kremlin, claiming: “We saved his life with great effort and work.

“In the first place, there was no influence on the patient's treatment and there could not have been one.

“We haven't agreed on diagnoses with anyone. There was no pressure on us from doctors or other forces. & # 39;

His wife, Yulia Navalnaya, appealed to Vladimir Putin to allow Mr. Navalny to be medical evacuated to Germany after Russian health officials initially said he was too sick to fly

His wife, Yulia Navalnaya, appealed to Vladimir Putin to allow Mr. Navalny to be medical evacuated to Germany after Russian health officials initially said he was too sick to fly

Chief physician of the Omsk hospital that treated Navalny Alexander Murakhovsky, left, chief physician and deputy Anatoly Kalinichenko. They denied claims that they were pressured by the Kremlin for not discovering traces of poison in his blood

Chief physician of the Omsk hospital that treated Navalny Alexander Murakhovsky, left, chief physician and deputy Anatoly Kalinichenko. They denied claims that they were pressured by the Kremlin for not discovering traces of poison in his blood

Senior physician Anatoly Kalinichenko claimed during the press conference: “If we had found some kind of poison that was somehow confirmed, it would have been a lot easier for us. It would have been a clear diagnosis, a clear condition, and a known course of treatment. & # 39;

Navalny was rushed from Siberia to Charite Hospital in Berlin on Saturday after his allies said the hospital was poorly equipped and they didn't trust doctors.

His movements during his stay in Siberia have been "extensively investigated" by state surveillance, reported the Russian newspaper Moskovsky Komsomolets.

Sources said he was followed to meetings in Tomsk, the apartment he lived in, to collect receipts at a shop and even during a short trip out of town to swim in Tom's at night.

His spokeswoman Kira Yarmysh complained that police surveillance during a stopover in Novosibirsk was "absolutely obvious".

"Security services tend to believe the poisoning-related events likely took place at the airport or on the plane," the newspaper wrote.

"His movements and contacts in the city have been thoroughly investigated."

Navalny, a longtime critic of Putin, is pictured at the top of a march in memory of the murdered Kremlin critic Boris Nemtsov in Moscow in February 2020

Navalny, a longtime critic of Putin, is pictured at the top of a march in memory of the murdered Kremlin critic Boris Nemtsov in Moscow in February 2020

Vladimir Putin and the Kremlin were accused of fueling the poisoning. You still have to respond to the allegations

Vladimir Putin and the Kremlin were accused of fueling the poisoning. You still have to respond to the allegations

The Charite Hospital said it would not comment on his illness until the test results were evaluated and only confirm that he is still in a coma but "stable".

His wife, Yulia Navalnaya, came to the hospital on Sunday to visit her husband. Top adjutant Leonid Volkov also visited the hospital but did not speak to reporters.

Mr Navalny fell ill on a flight from Siberia to Moscow on Thursday and was hospitalized after the plane made an emergency landing.

While his followers and family insist that he was poisoned, doctors in Omsk said a metabolic disorder was the most likely diagnosis.

Russian health officials said tests had shown no poison in his system and initially resisted transfer to Germany. He is too sick to fly.

The dissident's supporters said this was a ploy to allow the poison to leave its system.

An independent Russian news report over the weekend quoted sources in security agencies as saying that Mr Navalny was under intense surveillance during his trip to Siberia.

Moskovsky Komsomolets released details of monitoring his every move, including what he and his staff ate, whom he met, his credit card records, purchase receipts, where he stayed, what vehicles he traveled in, and even swam in a river for a night.

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