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Psychology: The motivation to try new things starts to fail at the age of 54.


"Get up and go" starts to fail at the age of 54 as we lose our motivation to get off the couch and try new things, as study results show

  • A Norwegian expert asked 917 people between the ages of 14 and 77 about their passion and commitment
  • He found that these factors correlated strongly in early life, especially in boys
  • However, after age 53, that correlation begins to fade, he explained
  • This means that people need to be more interested in things in order to achieve them

People lose their “getting up and walking” at the age of 54 – when it becomes more difficult to motivate themselves to get off the couch and try new things – a study found.

An expert from Norway surveyed 917 people, ages 14 to 77, to see how the relationship between passion, graininess, and a positive attitude changes with age.

They found that passion and grit have a strong correlation early on in life, especially among boys, and that young people create the distance to make their dreams come true.

However, that tendency subsides with age, they added.

People lose their “getting up and walking” at the age of 54 – when it becomes more difficult to motivate themselves to get off the couch and try new things – a study found

"Our passion determines the direction of the arrow, what we are getting ourselves into and what we want to achieve," said paper author and psychologist Hermundur Sigmundsson of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim.

"Grit drives our strength, how much effort we are willing to put into something," he continued.

A correlation between the two factors is key for a person to get really good at something, the researchers believe.

Truly passionate people are willing to work the hardest to become the best – men are more likely to do this than women – the team reported.

Prof. Sigmundsson said that having a positive attitude enables people to believe that they are actually getting good at what they are passionate about.

He explained that encouragement and positive attitudes share a similar pattern and are all connected to everything – at least at a young age.

But this correlation diminishes with age.

"The correlations stay pretty similar between ages 14 and 53. But once you are in your fifties there is a shift," said Professor Sigmundsson.

& # 39; The connection between passion and grit is becoming almost non-existent. In theory, we need a lot more to actually do something. & # 39;

He said this means that lazy people in their fifties can be full of good intentions and theoretically excited about doing something.

However, research suggests that they seldom stick to things unless they find something they're genuinely interested in.

"Once you are in your fifties there is a shift," said Professor Sigmundsson. & # 39; The connection between passion and grit is becoming almost non-existent. In theory, we need a lot more to actually do something. & # 39;

“That means it is more difficult to mobilize our strength and willpower, even when we have the passion. Or we have the strength and willpower, but are not quite as enthusiastic, ”said Professor Sigmundsson.

& # 39; The correlation between grit and the right mindset decreases with age. Willpower and the belief that we will get better are no longer so closely related. & # 39;

Professor Sigmundsson advised people "to find meaningful activities and interests that you can pursue with grit and willpower".

“Igniting the spark is important regardless of age. You just have to actively seek out what you are passionate about if you haven't already. & # 39;

& # 39; There are no shortcuts. "Use it or lose it" is the mantra, and this is also consistent with neuropsychology, "he concluded.

The full results of the study were published in the journal New Ideas in Psychology.

It is not possible to pursue a loved one and not to travel the world with "greatest regrets".

In six studies, two researchers, Dr. Shai Davidai of the New School for Social Research and Professor Thomas Gilovich of Cornell University, the idea that profound regrets result from not pursuing our most ambitious dreams.

They found that these deeply ingrained regrets were due to not pursuing a loved one, giving up hope of playing a musical instrument and not traveling the world.

These refer to what is referred to as a person's "ideal self" – the image that every person has in their mind of who they are and what kind of person they want to be.

Further examples (age of anonymous volunteer in brackets):

• I sold (my shares in) Netflix and Facebook before the big start after 2011 (29 years old).

• 'About 10 years ago I went on a big diet and lost 53 pounds. I kept the weight off for years (…) I thought I would never put on weight again and totally regret all the eating mistakes I made & # 39; (43 years old)

• In my first year of study, I had an incredible opportunity to do research myself in two different countries. I didn't leave because my family didn't want me to go and I had financial concerns related to my home, funding, and pet. "(22 years old)

• “My biggest regret was that I didn't go to school when I got the chance. I've had success elsewhere and raised my family the way I wanted, but I've always regretted not leaving ”(54 years old)

• “My biggest regret in life has been not to realize my dream of singing. Instead, I followed a traditional path and became a teacher. The dream remains … the what if! & # 39; (62 years old)

• & # 39; I'm sorry I stopped having fun in high school & # 39; (18 years old)

• “I regret that I did not get involved in anything outside of school during my school days. I was in the national honor society but that hardly matters (33 years old)

• 'I regret not keeping in touch with my best friend in college. It pains me that we lost touch & # 39; (26 years old)

• “I think I didn't pursue an acting career when I was young. I feel like I gave up on my dream because others had doubts. I wish I could go back in time and tell the younger me to believe more in my talent. & # 39; (35 years old)

• 'Letting go of a girl who was an incredible game for me in almost every way imaginable because I was in a relationship with someone I knew wasn't right for me' (30 years old)

• & # 39; My greatest regret was to remarry and leave a job, home, and state that I was happy with. I made a terrible mistake and gave up too much to alleviate a loneliness I was feeling. What an idiot I was & # 39; (71 years old)

• Many years ago when my husband and I got married for the first time, we almost bought our dream home. It wasn't ideal, but we loved it. We decided not to buy it as we felt the pressure from our parents. I regret not having ascended, being an adult and leaving with my gut instinct. I am sorry that our parents influenced us so much. I also regret it because it wouldn't just have been a great investment. & # 39; (46 years old)

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