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Protesters gather in Louisville as anger mounts after just one police officer charges Breonna Taylor's death


A packed U-Haul truck threw shields, signs, water and other protest gear at protesters immediately took to the streets in Louisville, Kentucky Wednesday afternoon.

Hundreds had gathered in Jefferson Square Park to hear the Kentucky Grand Jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death on March 13 in a warrant.

They broke out in anger, disgust and sadness The grand jury sued only one of the three police officers involved in the death of the 26-year-old black woman for "deliberately endangering" Taylor's neighbors.

In other parts of the city members of the armed right-wing extremist group, the Boogaloo Boys, had also gathered to counter the protests against the Taylor decision.

They were seen approaching fully armed Louisville residents and having verbal arguments with drivers as they marched down streets.

Other cities across the country, such as New York City and Chicago, were preparing for a night of riot when protesters also gathered there.

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A woman reacts in fear after a Kentucky grand jury decides on Breonna Taylor's death

Hundreds of people gathered in Jefferson Square Park to hear the grand jury's decision reacted with anger and frustration after learning that only one of the three officials involved in Taylor's death would bring charges

Hundreds of people gathered in Jefferson Square Park to hear the grand jury's decision reacted with anger and frustration after learning that only one of the three officials involved in Taylor's death would bring charges

Armed counter-demonstrators also came to Louisville and were seen harassing drivers

The armed counter-protesters were filmed as they approached cars

Armed counter-demonstrators also came to Louisville and were seen harassing drivers

A police officer arrests a protester as people react following a criminal case decision against police officers implicated in the death of Breonna Taylor, who was shot dead by police at her home in Louisville, Kentucky March 13th

A police officer arrests a protester as people react following a criminal case decision against police officers implicated in the death of Breonna Taylor, who was shot and killed by police at her home in Louisville, Kentucky March 13th

People were seen crying and crying in Jefferson Square Park as others quickly gathered to march, despite the 72 hour curfew and large parts of the city being closed.

& # 39; That's it? & # 39; Some asked while others called to burn the city down. "We don't get a murder charge?" asked another.

Many were annoyed that Brett Hankison, the only police officer charged with three cases of "wanton harm" of Taylor's neighbors, was only required to leave bail of $ 15,000.

WHAT IS WANTON RISK?

What's the fee?

Willful endangerment charges are made when a person is found to have engaged in reckless behavior without caring for human life, thereby placing a person at risk of death or serious injury.

"A person is guilty of willful endangerment in the first degree if, under circumstances that show extreme indifference to the value of human life, he willfully commits behavior that represents a serious risk of death or serious bodily harm to another person," says it in state law.

What is the penalty?

Exposure to Wanton in Kentucky is a Class D crime.

It can result in a prison sentence of up to five years.

How are the charges related to the Breonna Taylor case?

The three cases of wanton harm were brought against Officer Brett Hankison after the bullets he fired at Taylor's apartment ended up in an adjacent apartment.

Crime scene photos show the walls of Taylor's apartment full of bullet holes.

The protesters appeared ready to take action with a U-Haul van that arrived quickly with signs and signs reading "Abolish the Police" and "Abolition now".

Video footage showed them rushing to unload the van before marching towards the barricaded part of the city.

Helicopters monitored the demonstration as it began shortly after the decision.

At around 2:15 p.m., the New York Times reported that 250 protesters were already out hunting with two dozen police cruisers.

The group first marched through the closed parts of the city and sang, "If we don't get it, shut it up."

Previously, a group of 150 people had blocked an intersection between Broadway and 6th Street, right in front of a barricade that authorities had put up around city buildings to keep demonstrators away.

The police arrived quickly and protesters moved on, watched by more police cars.

Tensions were already mounting when police prevented the crowd from entering certain streets and guides tried to keep the group together.

At one point, protesters stopped to mock officials waiting in a vehicle.

By 3 p.m., the crowd had grown to several hundred when they stopped at an intersection with signs to the front to organize.

Many shouted to those watching from home to join in.

Tensions continued to mount as the companies targeted and multiple windows were broken.

Some protesters knocked over tables and chairs outside a restaurant before meeting with a white civic group patrolling businesses to protect them.

"It tells people cops can kill you in the sanctity of your own home," Linda Sarsour, a Palestinian-American activist, told the Times of the decision.

"It cannot be justified," added Desaray Yarbrough, a Louisville resident who came out to watch the march go by.

"The lack of fees is preparing to overthrow the city."

When the demonstrators gathered before the announcement, the leaders had called for peace, and one of them urged the crowd to see that "the white checks the white, the black checks the black".

Protesters were unloading shields from a U-Haul truck as they began to march on Wednesday afternoon

Protesters unloaded shields from a U-Haul truck as they began marching on Wednesday afternoon

At the beginning of the protest, a crowd gathered at a barricade in the city center

At the beginning of the protest, a crowd gathered at a barricade in the city center

A police officer watches as people react to the grand jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death

A police officer watches as people react to the grand jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death

People are arrested in Louisville after a demonstration over Breonna Taylor's death Wednesday afternoon

People are arrested in Louisville after a demonstration over Breonna Taylor's death Wednesday afternoon

People react to the grand jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death as hundreds gather to protest

People react to the grand jury's decision on Breonna Taylor's death as hundreds gather to protest

Prior to the announcement, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer had announced a 72-hour curfew for the city from 9 p.m., except for those going to work or receiving medical treatment, pending unrest following the decision.

"I urge everyone to vote peaceful and lawful protest," said Fischer, a white Democrat, shortly before the announcement.

& # 39; This is obviously a really important time for our city. I want us to think about our children and grandchildren and do it right. & # 39;

He declared a state of emergency on Tuesday.

Barricades were also erected downtown this week to reduce access to the area.

Demonstrations over Taylor's death have been going on in Louisville for 100 days.

Four-wheeled military vehicles enter the city ahead of a curfew on Wednesday at 9 p.m., which remains in place for 72 hours

Four-wheeled military vehicles enter the city ahead of a curfew on Wednesday at 9 p.m., which remains in place for 72 hours

The protesters screamed in anger as the grand jury's decision was announced and a grand march began

The protesters screamed in anger as the grand jury's decision was announced and a grand march began

Other protesters watched in shock and disbelief as only one policeman was charged

Other protesters watched in shock and disbelief as only one police officer was charged

Across the country, other cities were preparing for protests, including weeks of riot over Taylor's shots.

Illinois Governor J. B. Pritzker had spoken to the National Guard about preparing for protests and spoke to Mayor Lori Lightfoot of Chicago.

Hankison faces up to five years' imprisonment if convicted on the endangerment charge.

He was with two coworkers when they shot and killed Taylor, 26, in front of their boyfriend on March 13.

The other two officers, Sergeant Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, were not charged, as the investigation found that they were warranted under Kentucky law "in the return of the fatal fire after being told by Kenneth Walker, Taylor's friend, Attorney General Daniel." That had been shot at, "Cameron said.

"There is no doubt that this is a nerve-wracking, emotional case," Cameron, a black Republican, said at a news conference.

Taylor's death, alongside that of George Floyd, a black man who died in May after a white Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck, sparked a wave of national protests calling for racial justice and an end to the use of excessive law enforcement force.

Anger as only one police officer is accused of endangering neighbors with wild fire in Breonna Taylor's death and two others run for FREE

The discharged Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged with three willful threats in connection with the police raid on the night of March 13th

The discharged Louisville detective Brett Hankison was charged on the night of March 13 of three willful threats in connection with the police raid

One of the three Louisville police officers involved in the fatal shooting of Breonna Taylor was indicted by a Kentucky grand jury after four months of investigations into the death of the 26-year-old EMT, who led nationwide protests against police brutality triggered.

Jefferson County Circuit Judge Annie O & # 39; Connell announced on Wednesday the grand jury's decision to indict former detective Brett Hankison of three willful threats in connection with the police raid on the night of March 13th.

The first degree indictment, a Class D crime punishable by up to five years in prison, relates to the fact that Hankinson shot in the neighboring apartments during the incident, not Taylor's death.

Hankinson was fired from the Louisville Metro Police Department in June after officials said he violated guidelines by "willfully and blindly" firing his gun during the robbery.

Sgt Jonathan Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, who were also present at the time of the fatal operation, were not charged.

Neither the grand jury nor the presiding judge addressed the indictment.

Attorney General Daniel Cameron addressed the long-awaited decision at a press conference in Frankfurt shortly after the announcement.

Cameron revealed the investigation found:

  • Sergeant Mattingly and Detectives Cosgrove and Hankison had no known involvement in obtaining the March 13th search warrant.
  • Mattingly was the first and only officer to enter the residence, where he saw Taylor's friend Kenneth Walker by an open fire.
  • There is no evidence that Sergeant Mattingly was hit by friendly fire from other officers.
  • Mattingly returned fire with six shots. Almost at the same time, Detective Cosgrove also shot 16 times in the doorway.
  • A total of six bullets struck Taylor, but only one was classified as fatal.
  • Detective Hankison fired his gun ten times and shot bullets in Apartment 4 and Apartment 3.
  • At that time, three residents of Apartment 3 were at home, including a man, a pregnant woman and a child.
  • There is no conclusive evidence that bullets fired from Detective Hankison's gun hit Taylor.
  • The ballistic analysis did not reveal which of the three officers had fired the fatal shot.
  • The FBI investigation later revealed that the fatal shot was fired by Detective Cosgrove.
  • The investigation found that Mattingly and Cosgrove were justified in the use of force after Walker opened fire.

He gave a detailed account of the months of investigation into the events that led to the fatal shooting. He said they were put together through ballistic reports, 911 calls, and witness interviews due to the lack of bodycam footage.

But Cameron, who is the state's first black attorney general, said the officers weren't charged for defending themselves after Taylor's friend shot them.

“I certainly understand the pain caused by the tragic loss of Miss Taylor. I understand that as an attorney general … I understand that as a black man, "Cameron told reporters.

“This team, myself and the attorney general have received a lot of criticism and scrutiny. But this exam was out of place in many ways because there wasn't a day when the people in this office didn't go to sleep and think about this case.

Louisville police have declared a state of emergency ahead of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement on whether or not he will blame officers involved in Breonna Taylor's death (pictured)

Louisville police have declared a state of emergency ahead of Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron's announcement on whether or not he will blame officers involved in Breonna Taylor's death (pictured)

Myles Cosgrove

John Mattingly

Officers Myles Cosgrove (left) and John Mattingly (right), who were present during the March 13 raid, were not charged on Wednesday. Hankison was fired from the LMPD while the other two officers were given administrative orders

“The criminal law should not react to every sadness and grief, and that applies here. But my heart breaks for the loss of Miss Taylor, ”the AG said.

Investigators believe Cosgrove was responsible for firing the bullet that killed Taylor. Taylor was shot at least five times after officers stormed her home while responding to a search warrant for a drug investigation.

Her friend Kenneth Walker opened fire when police broke in and met Mattingly. Walker was charged with attempted murder of a police officer, but prosecutors later dropped the charges.

Walker had told police he heard a knock but had no idea who came into the house and fired in self-defense.

Cameron said Cosgrove and Mattingly were not charged after investigators found their actions were justified because Walker opened fire.

"Kentucky law justified the use of force by (Officers Jonathan) Mattingly and (Myles) Cosgrove to protect themselves," he said. "That justification prevents us from prosecuting Miss Breonna Taylor's death."

The three officers did not participate in obtaining the arrest warrant, he said.

The raid was widely reported by the media as a "no-knock" order. However, further investigation later revealed that the police had knocked before entering.

Walker had also told investigators he heard a knock, but claimed the police had not identified themselves as police.

They knocked on Taylor's front door and announced their presence outside, which Cameron said was confirmed by a neighbor who witnessed the arrival.

Cameron received no response, saying police officers broke through the door and gained entry to the apartment.

Mattingly went in first, and at the end of a corridor saw Taylor and Walker aiming a gun.

Walker fired and injured Mattingly in the thigh. Mattingly returned fire and his colleagues began shooting soon after, Cameron said. Hankison fired 10 bullets, Cameron said.

Six bullets struck Taylor, although there is no "conclusive" evidence that any came from Hankinson's gun, Cameron said. Bullets fired by Hankison went to an adjacent apartment.

Donald Trump and Kamala Harris step forward when asked about Breonna Taylor and say they need to read the verdict first after outrage infiltrated if only one cop is charged

President Donald Trump stumbled when asked if justice was being served after a grand jury in Kentucky charged a single official with the murder of Breonna Taylor.

The president spoke about his own records – comparing them again with Abraham Lincoln's – and said he would comment on them later.

He was asked at the White House shortly after Detective Brett Hankison was charged with three cases of wanton harm, but two other officers were not charged.

The president was asked shortly thereafter, “Do you believe that justice served justice in the Breonna Taylor case in Kentucky, and what is your message to the black community that believes that justice may not have served through the decision made by the decision was that rendered by the Kentucky Grand Jury? & # 39;

& # 39; & # 39; Well my message is that I love the black community. And I've done more for the black community than any other president, ”President Trump said Wednesday when asked for his immediate response to a single officer charged in the Breonna Taylor shooting

& # 39; & # 39; Well my message is that I love the black community. And I've done more for the black community than any other president, ”President Trump said Wednesday when asked for his immediate response to a single officer charged in the Breonna Taylor shooting

"I haven't read it in full yet, but there is no question Breonna Taylor and her family deserve justice yesterday, today, and tomorrow, so I'll check it out," Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) Said when she they asked about the fees

He replied, “Well my message is that I love the black community. And I've done more for the black community than any other president. And I say, with the possible exception of Abraham Lincoln, ”Trump said before shaking off successes, some of which built on existing programs or included democratic buy-in.

"And that means with opportunity zones and with reform of the criminal justice system, with prison reform, with what we have done for historically black universities, colleges, schools, what we have done – nobody has done more," said the President.

& # 39; Abraham Lincoln, let's give him the nod, but beyond that no one has done more. I love the black community, ”said Trump.

He eschewed any language of the sentence itself when the authorities in Louisville, where Taylor was killed, declared a curfew and lined the streets to protect themselves from possible riot.

“I don't know enough about it. I heard the decision was just made. We were here together and didn't talk about it. But after seeing what the decision is, I'll comment on it, "said Trump.

Rival Joe Biden's fellow campaigner, Senator Kamala Harris, also declined to comment immediately on the charges.

"I haven't read it in full yet, but there is no question that Breonna Taylor and her family deserve justice yesterday, today and tomorrow, so I'll check it out," said the Senate Judiciary.

Harris tweeted in June: “The officers who murdered Breonna Taylor nearly three months ago have still not been charged. We cannot forget black women in our search for justice. & # 39;

A timeline of events related to the death of Breonna Taylor

March 13: Narcotics warrant officers fatally shot Taylor in her Louisville, Kentucky home.

– March 13, hours later: Police announce the arrest of Kenneth Walker after wounding an officer in an exchange of fire. Taylor is not identified at the press conference and is described as "an unresponsive woman who was later pronounced dead."

– March, April: The shooting stays out of the headlines as the COVID-19 pandemic spreads across the US.

– On April 27, Taylor's family files an unlawful death lawsuit against the police and the city, questioning the police narrative.

– May 13: Louisville Attorney General Tom Wine refuses to review the police investigation. Attorney General Daniel Cameron is appointed Special Attorney.

– May 22: Prosecutors announce they will drop murder charges against Walker, who shot officers at his girlfriend's home.

May 28: Three days after George Floyd was killed by police in Minnesota, Walker's tortured 911 call was released, sparking protests in Louisville.

– May 29: Mayor Greg Fischer suspends Louisville police's use of arrest warrants.

– June 1: Fischer fires Police Chief Steve Conrad after officers failed to use body cameras when shooting grill chef David McAtee during the protests in Louisville.

– June 11: Louisville Metro Council unanimously passes Breonna Act banning the use of warrants.

– June 14: Pop star Beyoncé writes to Attorney General Daniel Cameron asking him to prosecute cops.

– June 23: Officer Brett Hankison, one of three officers who fired shots on the night of Taylor's death, is fired for "blindly" shooting in Taylor's apartment.

– June 25: Celebrities join hundreds of protesters outside the state capitol asking Cameron to indict officers.

June 28th: ​​Photographer Tyler Gerth is fatally shot and killed amid ongoing protests in downtown Louisville.

– July 14th: Protesters arrested for demonstrating on Cameron's lawn.

– August 12: Taylor's mother, Tamika Palmer, meets with Cameron.

– September 5: Hundreds peacefully protest outside Kentucky Derby, urging Cameron to prosecute the officials.

– September 7th: Fischer appoints Yvette Gentry, the first black woman to head the Louisville Police Department, as interim chief from October 1st.

– September 9: Cameron is shortlisted from President Donald Trump's Supreme Court nomination.

September 15: The city announces a civil settlement that will provide Taylor's family with $ 12 million and promising police reforms.

– September 22: Louisville Police force blockades downtown in anticipation of Cameron's announcement.

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