ENTERTAINMENT

Propaganda war on Brexit deal as EU downplays Britain's achievements on the chart


A propaganda war has broken out after the EU underestimated the British government's successes in negotiating the Brexit deal.

A government document leaked today showed actual gains for the British after the end of the transition period on December 31st.

Issues such as free movement, trade and energy, which the EU called losses to Britain in a graph released yesterday, were indeed victories, according to the British victories table.

The document claimed that the UK has more than twice as many victories as the EU, with 28 wins for the UK against 11 for the EU. 26 "mutual compromises" were uncovered.

A government document leaked today showed actual gains for the British after the transition period ended on December 31st. In the picture, Prime Minister Boris Johnson revealed that a deal had been made yesterday

Issues such as free movement, trade and energy, which the EU called losses to Britain in a graph released yesterday, were indeed victories, according to the British victories table

Issues such as free movement, trade and energy, which the EU called losses to Britain in a graph released yesterday, were indeed victories, according to the British victories table

The UK Government's assessment found that it had "protected financial services from reciprocal retaliation" in disputes over other areas of the agreement

The UK Government's assessment found that it had "protected financial services from reciprocal retaliation" in disputes over other areas of the agreement

Some experts questioned the assessments in the UK document, suggesting that much of the “gains” for the EU came from the vital service sector of the economy. As of January 1, there are no comprehensive provisions for financial services

Some experts questioned the assessments in the UK document, suggesting that much of the “gains” for the EU came from the vital service sector of the economy. As of January 1, there are no comprehensive provisions for financial services

Meanwhile, the EU chart claimed that the UK had only retained two of the benefits of membership in the organization.

Four and a half years after the British voted to leave the EU, Boris Johnson announced yesterday that a trade deal had finally been agreed.

The Prime Minister said this was "the basis for a happy, successful and stable partnership with our friends in the EU for the years to come", but the negotiations were far from easy.

Senior ministers were given dressing downs worth watching on Netflix, sources said, while the EU "went insane" during negotiations over a Downing Street tweet.

And the prime minister's announcement had to be postponed after officials discovered a last minute mathematical error related to fishing.

Later in the day, the EU released a chart comparing the deal to member states' privileges.

Later in the day, the EU released a chart comparing the deal to member states' privileges

Later in the day, the EU released a chart comparing the deal to member states' privileges

It was alleged that the UK was losing freedom of movement because the British could no longer travel to the EU for more than 90 days without a visa. Other benefits that would be deprived of the British were the abolition of roaming charges and smooth trading.

However, a leaked document has proven that the UK has actually made a lot more profits than the chart suggested.

The British can still travel to the EU for up to 90 days without a visa and issues such as limiting family benefits for EU citizens coming to the UK have been identified in favor of the UK.

The UK has also called the telecommunications negotiations a win. The document reads: "The agreement promotes regulatory cooperation in the field of mobile roaming in line with the EU-Japan."

Boris Johnson said the UK would regain full control of fish stocks after a five and a half year transition period

Boris Johnson said the UK would regain full control of fish stocks after a five and a half year transition period

There are also a number of gains for the UK around trading. The document states: “The text clarifies the UK's right to regulatory autonomy, but it also contains helpful provisions on regulatory cooperation which the Commission opposed.

What happens next?

After a Brexit deal text has been finalized, the next step is ratification by both sides – and there isn't much time until the end of the transition period on January 1st.

Christmas Day

Brussels will shorten its own processes, with the EU Member State Council likely to grant a “provisional” implementation before the deadline, rather than having the European Parliament approve it in advance.

This has angered many MPs as they will be under massive pressure to sign the agreement once it is in place.

Wednesday

MPs must pass laws that put the deal in the code of law

With Christmas Day tomorrow, this will likely happen next week. The Commons are being recalled from their festive break and may look at all stages of a bill in one day.

Approval of the package is virtually guaranteed as Boris Johnson has an 80-strong majority and Labor has indicated that it will at least abstain – if it doesn't support the deal.

January 1st

The new trade terms – or WTO terms, if something went wrong with the deal – come into effect.

"In certain areas, such as our approach to conformity assessment (testing to ensure the safety of goods), the UK has successfully resisted attempts to bind us to EU approaches."

The UK has also signed an agreement to co-operate in the management of the flow of roll-on roll-off ports in Dover and Holyhead, as well as the ability to share import and export declaration data.

Fisheries, a sticking point for both sides, was described by the British document as a "compromise".

It read: "The annual quota system will return after a transition of five and a half years in which access is fixed."

Yesterday Boris Johnson boasted that the UK would have "amazing" amounts of extra fish thanks to his Brexit deal – despite admitting concessions to the EU.

The historic deal with Brussels will mean the UK will get 25 percent of the bloc's existing catch back over the next five and a half years.

And the Prime Minister said he would regain full control of fish stocks after this transition period.

Ursula von der Leyen told her own briefing in Brussels that the terms were "balanced" but that the bloc had negotiated from a "position of strength" because no deal would have been worse for Great Britain.

& # 39; We finally reached an agreement. It's been a long and winding road, but we've got a lot to show, ”she said.

She said the EU had protected its single market and created "five and a half years of predictability for our fishing communities and strong incentives" so that access could continue afterwards.

Ms. von der Leyen said her overall feeling was more "relief" than "joy". "Farewell is so sweet sorrow," she added.

Referring to one of his mantras from the conversations, Mr Barnier said to reporters, "The clock has stopped ticking."

Confirmation has been repeatedly postponed in the past 24 hours as the "fish for fish" sides argued over the rules, with Ireland warning of a "problem" despite UK sources insisting there are "no major problems".

In a blessing to Mr Johnson, Sir Keir Starmer announced yesterday that he would order his MPs to back the deal – he was "thin" but better than no deal. The move effectively guarantees that the measures are successful.

"At a moment of such national importance, it is not credible for Labor to be on the sidelines," he said in an online press conference.

"So I can say today that Labor will accept this agreement and vote for it when it comes to parliament."

However, the battle to sell the package to voters and Tory MPs is already in full swing as Mr Johnson rings for troubled Tory backers.

An internal government assessment insisted that the UK "won" 43 percent of the main problems of the £ 668 billion package, compared with 17 percent where the EU was ahead.

There will be duty-free access to the EU's single market without quotas – and Mr Johnson has retained the ability to deviate from Brussels standards without the European Court of Justice playing a role. Disputes are settled by an independent arbitration tribunal, similar to the structures already included in the withdrawal agreement.

After four years there is an exit clause in which both sides can remove the conditions if they do not believe that they are “working fairly”.

The document boasts that concessions have been made on rules of origin for goods, tariff tightening and "trusted trader" systems, while "isolating" the financial services sector. A deal will also avoid major disruptions in addition to the coronavirus crisis.

However, the UK appears to have established fishing rights and provided little assistance to the service sector.

For its part, France has boasted that Mr Johnson has made "huge concessions" on fishing in recent stages as the mutated coronavirus variant has highlighted the vulnerability of Britain's borders.

Tory Brexiteers vowed to put together a "star chamber" of experts to examine the documents over Christmas. MailOnline understands that Mr. Johnson was "very straightforward" and did not seek to make a "hard sell" when he called senior MPs.

One MP said that subject to the full text, the breakdown is "what we hoped for". "Maybe it will be a happier Christmas after all," they suggested.

Nigel Farage accused Mr Johnson of "dropping the ball" – but he also insisted that it was "progress" and that Brexit was "over". He said that by the time he saw the text "in principle" he would vote for the package if he were an MP.

There are fears that political "landmines" will inevitably be exposed in the text.

The FTSE 100 closed just six points as a deal was largely priced in as the pound held onto recent gains and rose again slightly against the US dollar to 1.3547.

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