TOP TRENDING

Private doctors should be shamed for not performing urgent operations


Private doctors have been beaten up for non-urgent surgery while the NHS is under "unthinkable pressure" caused by rising Covid cases.

Doctors who privately perform elective surgeries should feel ashamed if they fear "to take the p *** again and walk away with the money," believe London's top NHS medics.

All London acute hospital trusts have been told to "consider very carefully" whether it is "appropriate" to do elective surgery when the same operations have been pushed back by the NHS.

A letter signed by top medical professionals and several London hospital trusts called for non-urgent surgeries to be postponed by a month so the number of cases could fall.

This means private health professionals can work for the NHS instead to ease the burden.

The UK announced another 573 coronavirus deaths yesterday. This was the highest Sunday surge since April and the third deadliest Sunday in the entire pandemic.

The infections are also still high: 54,940 were announced on Sunday – for the thirteenth day in a row they were above the 50,000 mark.

More than 3,800 cancer patients in London have waited more than two months for their first treatment as the number of non-Covid patients in UK hospitals has fallen by 10,000 in less than a month, new figures show. Pictured: Ambulance outside the Royal London Hospital

NHS hospitals treat less than half the cancer patients they would normally treat in an increase in coronavirus cases.

And the number of non-Covid patients has fallen by 10,000 across the UK in less than a month, while almost all planned care is being deported in the hardest-hit capital.

The letter, which was forwarded to the Health Service Journal, was signed by the Medical Director of the NHS in London, Vin Diwakar, and the Medical Directors of the Royal Free London Foundation Trust, Imperial College Healthcare Trust and Barts Health Trust

It read: “We are deeply uncomfortable that some non-time sensitive election work in the independent sector is continuing.

"We ask colleagues to think very carefully about the appropriateness of this issue and we would like that colleagues not to support the provision of such work in the independent sector for a period of one month from the date of this letter in the first instance until the first time the vaccination and the current lockdown will take effect and the pressure on NHS services will ease. & # 39;

If surgery can be postponed for more than a month, it shouldn't be done at all, the letter added.

It was announced on Sunday that NHS England's London Cancer Resilience Plan says London hospitals must treat more than 500 cancer patients each week.

As of this week, only 122 cancer cases have been treated in NHS hospitals, with another 101 in private hospitals.

Dr. Tom Dolphin of the British Medical Association told The Sunday Telegraph, "Hospitals are trying to increase capacity by reducing electoral work to next to nothing, but it seems that this will not be enough."

However, a group representing NHS trusts in England said health workers are doing everything in their power to perform emergency and cancer surgery.

Mr Diwakar said: “Our staff work around the clock and open hundreds of beds, including the London nightingale. Some surgeries are being postponed due to clinical need to ensure all Londoners continue to receive very urgent cancer surgery and make the most of existing NHS facilities in independent sector locations.

“On behalf of our NHS staff, I say to the Londoners, we need you. Stay home and do everything possible to reduce the transmission of the virus and help us save lives. & # 39;

NHS Providers executive director Chris Hopson said the delay in operations was a "temporary emergency response to a temporary emergency problem".

The footage showed the inside of St. George & # 39; s Hospital when Covid cases surfaced in the UK

The footage showed the inside of St. George & # 39; s Hospital when Covid cases surfaced in the UK

He said, “Every trust will do everything possible to ensure that the emergency and cancer surgery continues. We all know how important these cases are.

& # 39; Each trust will go out of their way to ensure that all of these operations are completed on time, including support from neighboring trusts and the use of private sector capacity.

& # 39; All cases that have to be temporarily postponed for a few days will obviously be rebooked as soon as possible.

“But nobody should confuse this with this standard practice. It is a temporary emergency response to a temporary emergency problem. & # 39;

All London acute hospital trusts have been told to "consider very carefully" whether it is "appropriate" to do elective surgery when the same operations have been pushed back by the NHS. Pictured: St. George & # 39; s Hospital in Tooting, London

All London acute hospital trusts have been told to "consider very carefully" whether it is "appropriate" to do elective surgery when the same operations have been pushed back by the NHS. Pictured: St. George & # 39; s Hospital in Tooting, London

A patient is prepared for transfer from the acute addiction unit to the intensive care unit at St. George & # 39; s Hospital in Tooting if his condition worsens

A patient is prepared for transfer from the acute addiction unit to the intensive care unit at St. George & # 39; s Hospital in Tooting if his condition worsens

London Mayor Sadiq Khan declared a major event on Friday, warning that there is a risk in the coming weeks that NHS hospitals will run out of beds if the virus continues to spread.

Dr. Rob Harwood, chairman of the British Medical Association's Advisory Committee, said doctors were "very concerned" about not being able to provide patients with the usual care.

He said: "Britain has gotten into the pandemic with a health service that is just too small for the country's needs. The lack of staff, beds and adequate funding means the NHS has always been forced to abandon non-urgent surgeries and other treatments to ensure it is able to cope with a pandemic – and that capacity is now expanding its Limits.

"This has created great anxiety among doctors who are extremely concerned about not being able to provide their patients with the high level of care that they want."

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) London (t) NHS