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Priti Patel meets the BBC comedian's amazing "Fancy a Curry" tweet


Priti Patel's allies have been angered by a BBC comedian's racist accusation on Twitter that she doesn't like curry, and have sparked a wave of racist abuse she calls "coconut."

Guz Khan, who can be seen on the BBC3 show Man Like Mobeen, released a photo of Ms. Patel who made a face with the message: "Shall we have a curry for dinner tonight, Priti?"

Followers came in to describe her as "the biggest coconut there is" while another said she "eats daal with a knife and fork".

However, one answer says: "It is not racist if we do it to Priti." Some people in these comments have to think about their attitudes. & # 39;

In some tweets, the Home Secretary is accused of being a coconut – white on the inside and brown on the outside – a racist accusation of accusing someone of betraying his legacy by turning to white views or opinions.

One user replied to Mr. Khan's tweet and said, "Only if it's a coconut curry."

An ally of the Home Secretary said: "The week she talked about the racist abuse she'd been exposed to all her life to get from another colored person, that's more than ironic."

The comedian, who lives in the Midlands with his wife and four children, maintained the tweet despite the backlash and posted a tweet showing the abuse he received for it and which was tagged in Priti Patel.

The follow-up tweet says: If you think my fans are bad … goddayum @pritipatel. & # 39; The 34-year-old will be known to viewers of BBC's popular Live at Apollo, where he has appeared several times.

Mr. Khan was raised by his mother in the suburbs of Coventry and before he became a comedian, he was a teacher at a secondary school in the same area.

It comes when the Home Secretary struck back today after Labor MPs accused her of "gas-lighting" BLM protesters by talking about her own experience of racism.

The interior minister expressed anger after the Labor Frontbencher signed a letter criticizing how she talked about her own background as a daughter of Gujarati refugees from Uganda.

Guz Khan's tweet, featured on the BBC3 show Man Like Mobeen, has sparked outrage on social media

A number of people on social media reacted negatively to the comedian's tweet. One person said Ms. Patel was definitely eating daal with a knife and fork.

A number of people on social media reacted negatively to the comedian's tweet. One person said Ms. Patel was definitely eating daal with a knife and fork.

Interior Minister Priti Patel expressed anger after the Labor Frontbencher signed a letter criticizing how she spoke about her own background

Interior Minister Priti Patel expressed anger after the Labor Frontbencher signed a letter criticizing how she spoke about her own background

Dozens of MEPs gave their name to the letter, expressing "dismay at how you have used your heritage and experience with racism to highlight the very real racism that blacks and communities across the UK are facing ".

In a sharp reprimand, they said, "Being a person of color doesn't automatically make you an authority in all forms of racism."

However, an angry Ms. Patel said this afternoon: "I will not be silenced by @ UKLabour MPs who continue to reject the contributions of those who disagree with how ethnic minorities should behave."

Cabinet ministers lined up behind their colleague tonight, and Matt Hancock swiped that critics seemed to think there was something like the wrong kind of BAME. "We think people are the same," he said of the daily meeting on Downing Street.

Workers stressed that the letter was organized by the MPs themselves rather than the party, and declined to say whether Sir Keir Starmer agreed to the content.

Dozens of Labor MPs wrote a letter to Priti Patel expressing "dismay at how you have used your heritage and experience with racism to highlight the very real racism that blacks and communities across the UK are facing." are facing ".

Dozens of Labor MPs wrote a letter to Priti Patel expressing "dismay at how you have used your heritage and experience with racism to highlight the very real racism that blacks and communities across the UK are facing." are facing ".

The spit came after Ms. Patel responded to violence in BLM protests by telling the Commons earlier this week that attacks on police officers were never acceptable

Responding to opposition politicians' barbs in the chamber, she insisted, "When it comes to racism, sexism and tolerance for social justice, I won't give lectures from the other side of the house."

Today's letter was sent on a letter by Labours Naz Shah – who apologized for anti-Semitic social media posts in 2016, including the statement that Israel should be relocated to the United States

Cabinet ministers lined up behind their colleague tonight, and Matt Hancock swiped that critics seemed to think there was something like the wrong kind of BAME. "We think people are the same," he said of the daily meeting on Downing Street

Cabinet ministers lined up behind their colleague tonight, and Matt Hancock swiped that critics seemed to think there was something like the wrong kind of BAME. "We think people are the same," he said of the daily meeting on Downing Street

Patel's scorching response to MPs who said they "did not understand racial inequality"

Priti Patel sent MPs a scorching reply in the House of Commons on Monday, stating that she did not understand racial inequality.

"On that basis, it must have been a very different interior minister, often referred to as Paki as a child in the playground," she said.

An entirely different interior minister who has been racially abused or even advised to drop her last name and use her husband's to promote her career.

Another Home Secretary recently, if I can put it that way, characterized the Guardian newspaper as a fat cow with a ring through his nose – something that was not only racially but also culturally and religiously insulting.

& # 39; This is hardly an example of respect, equality, tolerance or fairness. So when it comes to racism, sexism and tolerance for social justice, I will not give lectures from the other side of the house. & # 39;

The spit came after Ms. Patel responded to violence in BLM protests by telling the Commons earlier this week that attacks on police officers were never acceptable.

Responding to opposition politicians' barbs in the chamber, she insisted, "When it comes to racism, sexism and tolerance for social justice, I won't give lectures from the other side of the house."

Today's letter was sent on a letter by Labours Naz Shah – who apologized for anti-Semitic social media posts in 2016, including the statement that Israel should be relocated to the United States.

Among other things, it was signed by the shadow leader of the Valerie Vaz house, the shadow rail minister Tan Dhesi and the former shadow home secretary Diane Abbott. A total of 32 MPs gave the message its name.

It said: "We are writing to you as a member of the Black Asian and Ethnic Minority Labor to highlight our dismay at how you have used your heritage and experience with racism to highlight the very real racism with which blacks and communities across Britain are facing …

“We all have our own personal stories about the racism we have been exposed to, whether defined by the color of our skin or the belief we believe in.

“Our shared experiences enable us to feel the pain that communities feel when they are exposed to racism. They enable us to show solidarity with a common cause. They do not allow us to define, silence or hinder the feelings of other minority groups.

“Being a colored person doesn't automatically make you an authority in all forms of racism.

"Structures of racism, hatred and inequality have many layers, so there are some experiences with racism that we all face, but also some experiences with racism that we are not all facing."

In the Commons on Monday, Ms. Patel informed MPs that at least 35 officials had been injured in BLM protests in London when she said she "welcomed her bravery."

And she gave a scorching response to the opposition banks' criticism for claiming that she did not understand racial inequality.

"On that basis, it must have been a very different interior minister, often referred to as Paki as a child in the playground," she said.

An entirely different interior minister who has been racially abused or even advised to drop her last name and use her husband's to promote her career.

Priti Patel is pictured as a baby with her mother, who came to the UK from Gujarat via Uganda. She took her Tory values ​​and work ethic from her parents

Priti Patel is pictured as a baby with her mother, who came to Great Britain from Uganda via Uganda. She took her Tory values ​​and work ethic from her parents

A young priti with her father. Her parents, Sushil and Anjana, initially lived in a small room in North London, while her father graduated in engineering

A young priti with her father. Her parents, Sushil and Anjana, initially lived in a small room in North London, while her father graduated in engineering

Priti Patel's allies struck back because of the comedian's racially charged curry throat

Priti Patel's allies struck back after a comedian gave a racist jibe on Twitter for not liking curry.

Guz Khan, who can be seen on the BBC3 show Man Like Mobeen, released a photo of Ms. Patel who made a face with the message: "Shall we have a curry for dinner tonight, Priti?"

Followers piled up to describe her as "the biggest coconut there is" while another said she was eating "Daal with a knife and fork".

However, one answer says: "It is not racist if we do it to Priti." Some people in these comments have to think about their attitudes. & # 39;

An Interior Minister ally said, “The week she talked about the racist abuse she'd been exposed to all her life to get from another colored person, that's more than ironic

Another Home Secretary recently, if I can put it that way, characterized the Guardian newspaper as a fat cow with a ring through his nose – something that was not only racially but also culturally and religiously insulting.

& # 39; This is hardly an example of respect, equality, tolerance or fairness. So when it comes to racism, sexism and tolerance for social justice, I will not give lectures from the other side of the house. & # 39;

Regarding the protests themselves, Ms. Patel said: “As the ugly record of attacks by officials shows, some demonstrators have unfortunately turned to violence and abusive behavior over the weekend.

& # 39; This hooliganism is absolutely unjustifiable. There is no justification for it. There is no excuse to flare brave officers, throw bicycles on police horses, try to disregard the cenotaph, or destroy the statue of Winston Churchill, one of the greatest protectors of our freedoms who has ever lived.

"It is not up to mobs to demolish statues and cause criminal damage in our streets, and it is not acceptable for thugs to racially abuse black policemen to do their jobs.

"The criminals responsible for these illegal and ruthless acts betray the very thing they want to serve."

Ms. Patel said peaceful mass protests would be acceptable under normal circumstances, but due to the coronavirus crisis, "these are not normal circumstances" when she reminded the nation that "large gatherings of people are currently illegal."

At briefing 10 that evening, Mr. Hancock said he "detests the divisive identity policy" that is being used against Ms. Patel.

He was proud to be part of the "most diverse government in history".

"We don't think there is anything like the wrong kind of BAME," he said. "I just hope that the debates that are rightly taking place are debates on how we can promote real equal opportunities."

The full letter from Labor MPs to Interior Minister Priti Patel

RE: Shared feelings enable us to show solidarity without illuminating other minority communities

Dear Rt Hon Priti Patel MP,

We are writing to you as a member of the Black Asian and Ethnic Minority Labor to highlight our dismay at how you have used your heritage and experience with racism to highlight the very real racism that blacks and communities across the UK are facing.

In response to one of our colleagues in the chamber you said:

"When it comes to racism, sexism and tolerance for social justice, I will not give lectures from the other side of the house."

We all have our own personal stories about the racism we have been exposed to, whether defined by the color of our skin or the belief we believe in.

Our shared experiences enable us to feel the pain that communities feel when they are exposed to racism. They enable us to show solidarity with a common cause. They do not allow us to define, silence or hinder the feelings of other minority groups.

Being a colored person doesn't automatically make you an authority in all forms of racism.

Structures of racism, hatred and inequality have many layers, and so there are some experiences with racism that we all face, but also some experiences with racism that we all do not face.

Some forms have become acceptable in our communities, others exist under the breath and many are based on unconscious bias and systemic power structures.

The murder of George Floyd brought to light the authentic experiences of black men, women and children in the United States and Britain, from police brutality to structural and institutional racism that wrongly targets black communities in Britain. These experiences cannot be silenced by a shared feeling.

Finally, we ask that you consider your words and take into account the impact they have had on black communities in the UK to highlight their voices against racism.

Rest assured that colleagues from Asia and ethnic minorities on this side of the house will not use their experiences to silence our black colleagues, but will use our shared experiences to stand behind them and support their voices to to make us stand up against the different forms of racism facing black communities in Britain and around the world.

#Black lives count

Best wishes,

Naz Shah MP

Marsha De Cordova MP

Diane Abbott MP

Afzal Khan MP

Mohammed Yasin MP

Imran Hussain MP

Shabana Mahmood MP

Tan Dhesi MP

Virendra Sharma MP

Sir Mark Hendrick MP

Nadia Whittome MP

Rushanara Ali MP

Khalid Mahmood MP

Tulip Siddiq MP

Zarah Sultana MP

Preet Kaur Gill MP

Kate Osamor MP

Chi Onwurah MP

Clive Lewis MP

Rupa Huq MP

Bell Ribeiro Addy MP

Sarah Owen MP

Rosena Allin-Khan MP

Florence Eshalomi MP

Claudia Webb MP

Yasmin Qureshi MP

Apsana Begum MP

Feryal Clark MP

Taiwo Owatemi MP

Seema Malhotra MP

Dawn Butler MP

Valerie Vaz MP

Daughter of Gujarati Ugandan Asians, whose conservative values ​​were forged, worked with her parents in the family newspapers

Priti Patel was brought back to the heart of the government in July, less than two years after the shameful exit from the cabinet.

Gujarati Ugandan Asian's daughter, who had fled the Idi Amine regime, took her Tory values ​​and work ethic from her parents.

The far right and vocal Brexiteer was transferred to one of the most important political posts after Theresa May forced him to resign because of secret meetings with Israeli officials, including Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

The mother family, originally from Gujarat in India, moved to Uganda in the early 20th century and flourished in business.

But like all 80,000 Asians living there, they were driven out by the murderous dictator Idi Amin in the 1970s and had all their possessions confiscated.

Her parents, Sushil and Anjana, initially lived in a small room in North London while he was studying engineering.

Finally, they were able to buy a small house in Harrow and secure a bank loan for their first shop, a newspaper dealer in Tottenham.

Priti and her younger sister and younger brother were often asked to work with their parents in the various shops and post offices that they operated in Nottingham, Ipswich and Norwich.

When Priti reached middle school, the family bought a fine chocolate shop in Hertfordshire that had good state schools, including Watford Grammar, where she was head girl.

The family was "very outward, very international, but we're very conservative about our values," she says. "My parents are shopkeepers and have had difficulty establishing themselves in the UK."

Experience shaped their politics – just like the young Thatcher, daughter of a Grantham grocer.

Ms. Patel was elected to Parliament in 2010 at the age of 38 and four years later became Minister of Finance before being promoted to Minister of Labor after David Cameron's election victory in 2015.

She was one of the ministers who took advantage of Mr Cameron's decision to allow members of his government to fight on both sides of the EU referendum and played a prominent role in the holiday campaign.

Her appointment as international development minister was received with concern by some members of the community. She recalled that she had previously asked to replace her new ministry with a ministry for international trade and development that focuses more on promoting business opportunities in the UK's development world.

Her views on the death penalty were put in the limelight in 2011 when she used Question Time to say that she "would support the reinstatement of the death penalty to deter" murderers and rapists who re-offend ".

But in 2016, she told MPs that she did not support the death penalty.

The 47-year-old Witham MP was born in Harrow, north London, to parents who came to the UK from Idi Amins Uganda in the 1960s.

She studied at a comprehensive school in Watford before completing a degree in economics, sociology and social anthropology from Keele University and a postgraduate degree in government and politics in Essex.