ENTERTAINMENT

Princess Anne Gast works on Country Life on the occasion of her 70th birthday


Princess Anne speaks in an editorial for Country Life magazine about green energy, her annoyance with fly tippers, and her deep-rooted passion for the environment that emanates from her mother, the Queen – almost a year after Meghan Markle was guest of British Vogue had issued.

In a far-reaching call for weapons to secure the future of rural areas, the factual Princess Royal also spoke of her frustration with the lack of affordable housing in the country.

Anne published Country Life magazine as a guest this week on the occasion of her 70th birthday on August 15th. Your magazine stay is appropriately down-to-earth for the hard-working king.

Unlike the Duchess of Sussex, who was not photographed for her September issue of Forces For Change by British Vogue last year, but was seen in behind-the-scenes videos posted on the publication's Instagram channel, is the Princess Royal pictured on their estate in Gatcombe Park.

In Megan's Vogue edition, the Duchess of Sussex listed women she admired, including celebrities, politicians, and activists who are known to work on issues such as diversity, body positivity, transgender rights, and climate change.

However, she was criticized for not admitting the queen and was accused of "politicizing" the royal family.

Princess Anne decided to narrow the focus of her own magazine, instead sharing a tour of her 500-hectare estate and farm in Gloucestershire, highlighting the methods of organic farming she uses.

Princess Anne speaks in an editorial for Country Life magazine about green energy, her annoyance with fly tippers and her deep-rooted passion for the environment, which comes from her mother, the Queen. Pictured on their Gatcombe Park estate that looks after a pair of pigs

Princess Anne appears on the cover of the Country Life edition that she edited as a guest

The Duchess of Sussex was the editor of the September Forces For Change edition of British Vogue last year (Image: Your chosen cover stars Jacinda Ardern, Salma Hayek Pinault, Laverne Cox, Jameela Jamil, Yara Shahidi and Gemma Chan, Christy Turlington Burns, Adwoa Aboah, Adut Akech, Ramla Ali, Sinead Burke, Francesca Hayward, Jane Fonda, Greta Thunberg and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie)

Princess Anne appears on the cover of Country Life, which she edited as a guest on the left. The Duchess of Sussex was the editor of the September Forces For Change edition of British Vogue last year (picture right: your selected cover stars Jacinda Ardern, Salma Hayek Pinault, Laverne Cox, Jameela Jamil, Yara Shahidi and Gemma Chan, Christy Turlington Burns, Adwoa Aboah , Adut Akech, Ramla Ali, Sinead Burke, Francesca Hayward, Jane Fonda, Greta Thunberg and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie)

She takes care of pigs, dogs and horses, and on the front page there is also a more formal portrait of the king.

The only daughter of the Queen and Prince Philip praised her parents for their lifelong love of nature and wrote that she saw herself as a "classic all-rounder".

She also criticized solar panels and wind turbines and claimed that more imaginative energy sources were needed, but controversially suggested that "small nuclear reactors could have their place".

In the special issue of the magazine that hits the shelves today, the Princess Royal gives a tour of the 500-acre estate and farm in Gloucestershire where it was locked.

She discusses organic farming methods and the rare breeds that she keeps. Anne also reveals her favorite recipe: devil pheasant.

Anne published Country Life magazine as a guest this week on the occasion of her 70th birthday on August 15th. Your magazine stay is appropriately down-to-earth for the hard-working king

Anne published Country Life magazine as a guest this week on the occasion of her 70th birthday on August 15th. Your magazine stay is appropriately down-to-earth for the hard-working king

In the special issue of the magazine that hits the shelves today, the Princess Royal gives a tour of the 500-acre estate and farm in Gloucestershire where it was locked. Pictured: One of her dogs welcomes horses to the property

In the special issue of the magazine that hits the shelves today, the Princess Royal gives a tour of the 500-acre estate and farm in Gloucestershire where it was locked. Pictured: One of her dogs welcomes horses to the property

In her role as "campaign editor", Anne explains her vision for the country in a 2000-word column entitled "Waste not, want not" and encourages everyone to be more careful with waste.

She said it was a big irritation for her not to dispose of the trash properly, and insisted that we all have to do better to reduce it.

"If you want to help the planet, everyone can control our waste, and that will make a difference," she said.

“We will always produce waste as efficient as we become, so we have to reduce it better in every phase and be able to handle it better in the end.

“That means making things like clothes, furniture, vehicles and supermarket trolleys that can be recycled safely and economically and not thrown on someone else's floor.

The only daughter of the Queen and Prince Philip (photo 1999) paid tribute to her parents for their lifelong love of nature and wrote that she sees herself as a "classic all-rounder".

The only daughter of the Queen and Prince Philip (photo 1999) paid tribute to her parents for their lifelong love of nature and wrote that she sees herself as a "classic all-rounder".

The Princess Royal, pictured in 1957 as a child with her mother, the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh and Prince Charles on the Balmoral Castle estate in Scotland

The Princess Royal, pictured in 1957 as a child with her mother, the Queen, the Duke of Edinburgh and Prince Charles on the Balmoral Castle estate in Scotland

“Everything in today's life seems to be convenience, and waste is considered impractical. We have to help make it easier to deal with.

"Increasing the profile of the country code could be helpful, especially since the flight to the country after the corona virus appears to have led to an increase in garbage and vandalism."

The Mail and Keep Britain Tidy is calling on the public and businesses to help with garbage collection as part of the Great British September Clean from September 11-27. Everyone is encouraged to go to the streets, parks and beaches to fight the scourge of garbage.

Regarding green energy, Anne said "covering the landscape with solar panels and windmills" was not the answer.

"Better use of water, the use of crop waste, the use of forest waste and the ability to store energy, possibly as hydrogen, can all be helpful, but require a more flexible network and therefore the technology to do this works, "she explained.

In her role as "campaign editor", Anne explains her vision for the country in a 2000-word column entitled "Waste not, want not" and encourages everyone to be more careful with waste

In her role as "campaign editor", Anne explains her vision for the country in a 2000-word column entitled "Waste not, want not" and encourages everyone to be more careful with waste

"Small nuclear reactors could have their place, but maybe there isn't room to track that now."

She also advocated "quality, adequate housing of the right type and number in the right places" – arguing that young, retired and local families too often have a price in rural villages.

It called for greater esteem for small housing estates that are “built to last”.

“Everyone could make the difference to a viable school, shop or pub in the village. It is important that these housing developments are small and remain under the control of the local council, either for rent or as shared property, ”said Anne.

The Princess Royal also refers to her father's instability in childhood before he was introduced to the wilderness of Scotland at Gordonstoun School in Moray.

Philip moved between relatives in France and the UK and rarely saw his parents – his mother, who suffered from a mental illness, was taken to an asylum.

Anne's husband, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, 65, pictured in the middle next to Anne's daughter Zara Tindall, has written two pieces for the edition: a light-hearted My Week column about tree planting and dry stone walls and - in his role as chairman of the English heritage - one detailed description of the rescue of country houses

Anne's husband, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, 65, pictured in the middle next to Anne's daughter Zara Tindall, has written two pieces for the edition: a light-hearted My Week column about tree planting and dry stone walls and – in his role as chairman of the English heritage – one detailed description of the rescue of country houses

Anne wrote: “I was equally lucky that my two parents loved and understood the natural world through their own experiences.

"Perhaps more so for my father when he ended up at school in Gordonstoun during his rather incoherent young life and was introduced to the wilderness of Scotland, both on land and at sea."

She added: “Scotland also had an impact on my mother, as did the Norfolk sky and the vast fields and swamps of the Sandringham Estate. Windsors Home Park and Great Park were a constant presence for them as for all of us. & # 39;

The Queen and Philip are preparing to travel to Scotland soon to take their popular annual summer break at Balmoral, Aberdeenshire after spending the past four months at Windsor Castle.

When members of the British royal family became a journalist for a day

Various members of the British royal family, including Prince Charles, Prince Harry and the Duchess of Cambridge, have worked with various media organizations over the past decade.

Anne is not the first member of the royal family to contribute to country life. Her brother Prince Charles has published two different editions as a guest to commemorate his 65th and 70th birthday in 2013 and 2018, respectively.

In February 2016, Kate Middleton took the helm at Huffington Post UK for a day to highlight children's mental health.

Earlier this month, the Cornwall guest hosted her first radio show – BBC Radio 5 Live's Emma Barnett Show. Prince Harry Gast edited BBC Radio 4 Today in 2017.

And Meghan Markle was far from being the first member of the royal family to influence British Vogue.

Princess Diana appeared on the cover three times, while Princess Anne also appeared three times: in September 1971, May 1973 and November 1973.

Her sister-in-law, the Duchess of Cambridge, also decorated the cover of the 100th edition of the magazine in 2016 and occupied a 10-page photo spread.

Diana was featured three times on the Vogue cover

Meghan is not the first queen to appear in British Vogue. Sister-in-law Kate appears on the front page in June 2016

Meghan is not the first queen to appear in British Vogue. Sister-in-law Kate appears on the front page in June 2016 (right) – while Princess Diana (left) performed there three times

Anne said of Windsor: "Windsor was and is an oasis of peace, if not so quiet since the growth of air traffic – until it is closed."

She conceded that it was very difficult to follow her father after replacing him as President of the Royal Commission for the Exhibition established by Prince Albert in 1851.

Anne's husband, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence (65), has written two pieces for the edition: a lighthearted My Week column about tree planting and dry stone walls, and – as President of the English Heritage – a depth function for storing country houses.

The cover of the magazine contains a series of pictures of Anne from issues over the years.

Mark Hedges, editor of Country Life, said: “It was an absolute pleasure to have the Princess Royal as a guest editor.

“Their passion for the landscape is evident in all of their characteristics, combined with their concern that the right measures will be taken to protect the rural way of life of future generations, from providing affordable housing to dealing with fly butts. We hope that our special edition is a very suitable gift for your 70th birthday. & # 39;

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