ENTERTAINMENT

Prince William picks up a beer for the reopening of bars in England when he visits one of his locals in Norfolk


Prince William raised a beer for the reopening of bars in England when he visited one of his locals in Norfolk today.

The future king, 38, appeared at the Rose & Crown in Snettisham, about ten kilometers from his family's country house, Note Hall, and enjoyed his first sip of cider in a pub since the Corona virus was closed.

"First customer?" He asked hopefully when he arrived at the 600-year-old pub, one of several in the area that he and Kate had tried occasionally to be met by landlords Anthony and Jeannette Goodrich.

They are preparing for a major reopening tomorrow after a difficult three months in which the couple who have owned the pub for 25 years have had to close and take leave of more than 25 full-time employees.

The 38-year-old Duke of Cambridge took a sip of Aspalls cider when he visited The Rose and Crown Pub in Snettisham, Norfolk

Prince William put safety first and used hand sanitizer when he entered from his locals - about ten kilometers from his family's country house, Note Hall

Prince William put safety first and used hand sanitizer when he entered from his locals – about ten kilometers from his family's country house, Note Hall

The future king spoke to the pub's landlords and employees about their experience of the pandemic (image)

The future king spoke to the pub's landlords and employees about their experience of the pandemic (image)

They were able to partially reopen a few weeks ago and start selling takeaway drinks. Now they will offer socially distant drinking in three bars or in the pub garden where a marquee has been set up.

The Duke of Cambridge, who has been an apple cider drinker since he was a boy, has gone through part of the process that customers will face.

He was asked to wash his hands with disinfectant gel before ordering a beer from the bar, which was then delivered to a table in the garden.

»Can I have a pint of cider please? I'm an apple wine man, ”he said, ordering a £ 4.15 pint Aspall Suffolk Draft Cyder and a plate of chips.

The Goodriches (pictured with Prince William) told the king how they were forced to close the thriving pub, which has 16 rooms and, at the height of the summer season, provides up to 300 meals to visitors after investing 25 years of work. In the picture, disinfect his hands upon arrival

The Goodriches (pictured with Prince William) told the king how they were forced to close the thriving pub, which has 16 rooms and, at the height of the summer season, provides up to 300 meals to visitors after investing 25 years of work. In the picture, disinfect his hands upon arrival

William, who had paid for his drink by card before leaving, made the visit to demonstrate his support for the hotel industry. In the picture he orders his cider at the bar

William, who had paid for his drink by card before leaving, made the visit to demonstrate his support for the hotel industry. In the picture he orders his cider at the bar

After being asked to wash his hands with disinfectant gel before ordering a beer at the bar, he was delivered to a table in the garden (picture).

After being asked to wash his hands with disinfectant gel before ordering a beer at the bar, he was delivered to a table in the garden (picture).

The Duke (pictured) heard how the pub wanted to support their local community, including donating their remaining stock to the Purfleet Trust, which helps individual homeless people in King’s Lynn and West Norfolk, at the beginning of the closure

The Duke (pictured) heard how the pub wanted to support their local community, including donating their remaining stock to the Purfleet Trust, which helps individual homeless people in King’s Lynn and West Norfolk, at the beginning of the closure

"I don't know where to pay, I'll do it before I go, I promise," he said with a laugh when the beer was brought to him in the garden.

William predicted that people wanted to go to their locals in numbers, but expressed concerns that things might get messy.

"It could end with anyone in the pub," he said. “Because people just want a change of scene, because they have been at home for so long.

“Are you afraid that people will get a little out of control this weekend? I think it's more of a problem with the larger pub chains. & # 39;

Mr. Goodrich, 65, admitted: "We are somewhat concerned, but we are ready for it."

However, some parts of the pub must remain closed, including a popular children's playground that is set up like a galleon, as it is difficult to maintain social distance between the children. William said his own children loved it.

"The kids have been there a few times," he said, staring at the ropes that prevented anyone from entering. "You will see that as a challenge."

The king told the staff that customers would have to learn to get used to the new normal in pubs.

Prince William (pictured with a sip of cider) asked the landlords if they were worried that people could get out of control this weekend

Prince William (pictured with a sip of cider) asked the landlords if they were worried that people could get out of control this weekend

Prince William (pictured) said of the play area that will remain closed: “The children have been there a few times. You will see that as a challenge. & # 39;

Prince William (pictured) said of the play area that will remain closed: “The children have been there a few times. You will see that as a challenge. & # 39;

When the triple father (pictured) arrived at the 600-year-old pub, he joked: "First customer?"

When the triple father (pictured) arrived at the 600-year-old pub, he joked: "First customer?"

The pub is preparing for a major reopening tomorrow after three difficult months in which the couple who have owned the pub for 25 years have had to close and take leave of more than 25 full-time employees. In the picture, the king takes a sip of cider

The pub is preparing for a major reopening tomorrow after three difficult months in which the couple who have owned the pub for 25 years have had to close and take leave of more than 25 full-time employees. In the picture, the king takes a sip of cider

"We all have to take responsibility for our own two-meter bubble," he said.

William, who had paid for his drink by card before leaving, made the visit to demonstrate his support for the hotel industry.

The Goodriches told him how they were forced to close the thriving pub, which has 16 bedrooms and, at the height of the summer season, provides up to 300 meals for visitors after 25 years of work.

But they were saved by the government's job retention program and corporate loans.

"It was very scary for us for two or three weeks to think, is that it?" Said Anthony. Then the government came out with the job retention program.

"It was a huge relief because it meant that we could pay our employees a little bit of money and they are all nice, lovable locals."

The Prince of Wales has now welcomed the reopening of the hotel industry and described it as the "lifeblood of our economy".

Charles said it was "exceptionally welcome news" that hotels, restaurants and pubs were reopening.

And he described it as the first step in rebuilding a "vital and resilient industry" for "better and much more sustainable times".

During Prince William's visit, the staff (pictured with the king) spoke of their excitement about returning to work and explained the measures they have taken across the company to ensure that they can safely welcome their customers back

During Prince William's visit, the staff (pictured with the king) spoke of their excitement about returning to work and explained the measures they have taken across the company to ensure that they can safely welcome their customers back

The King ordered a £ 4.15 pint Aspall Suffolk Draft Cyder and a plate of chips during his visit (Image)

The King ordered a £ 4.15 pint Aspall Suffolk Draft Cyder and a plate of chips during his visit (Image)

The king learned how the employees (in the picture) have adjusted their way of working so that they can return to a new normal

The king learned how the employees (in the picture) have adjusted their way of working so that they can return to a new normal

The pub's current owners, Jeannette and Anthony Goodrich (pictured), who took over the landlords 25 years ago, spoke to His Royal Highness about the challenges the company faced throughout the closure

The pub's current owners, Jeannette and Anthony Goodrich (pictured), who took over the landlords 25 years ago, spoke to His Royal Highness about the challenges the company faced throughout the closure

The heir to the throne spoke in a video message about the support of the sector.

In it, he said: "I am only too aware that the past few weeks and months have been extremely difficult for everyone working in the hospitality industry – from people in the restaurant and pub industry who are making Britain famous worldwide to people who the accommodations offer millions of national and international visitors each year.

“As we all know very well, hospitality plays a crucial role in the economic health of our country and is often described as the elixir of life for the economy.

"It employs millions of people and indeed offers many young people between the ages of 18 and 24 their first job."

He welcomed the reopening of companies and continued: “I hardly have to say that it is extremely welcome news that hotels, restaurants and pubs should open their doors.

William (pictured) predicted that people want to go to their locals in numbers, but expressed concerns that it could get messy

William (pictured) predicted that people want to go to their locals in numbers, but expressed concerns that it could get messy

During his visit, William (pictured), who has been a cider drinker since his late teens, went through part of the process that customers will face

During his visit, William (pictured), who has been a cider drinker since his late teens, went through part of the process that customers will face

“Hospitality connects people and enables them to create wonderful memories with families and friends, be it with a pint of beer, a special meal with the family or an overnight stay to explore new places. All of these experiences were very much missed since normal life was put on hold. & # 39;

"I know that those who are at the forefront of hospitality have also missed their guests, so I can only express the resilience and steadfastness of the hospitality and express my deepest sympathy to those who have difficulty running their businesses hold." or have to cope with the terrible misery when their companies go into administration.

“I just pray that we can start to rebuild an important and resilient industry and that the wonderful entrepreneurial spirit that I meet so often can help to have better and more sustainable times ahead of us.

"Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for everything you do for this country."

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