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Prince Charles watches as Fijian soldiers perform dances on the 50th anniversary of Fiji's independence


I lakalaka what I see! A smiling Prince Charles watches as Fijian soldiers perform dances in traditional dress to mark the 50th anniversary of the South Pacific country's independence

  • Five Fijian soldiers held a Lakalaka celebration in Birkhall on Saturday
  • Prince Charles watched the performance of the soldiers in traditional skirts and shirts
  • Sergeant Lawaci presented the Prince of Wales with a tabua whale tooth

The Prince of Wales watched as Fijian soldiers performed traditional dances and songs to mark the 50th anniversary of the former crown colony's independence to an independent country.

Five Fijians of the Black Guard, Third Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland visited Prince Charles at Birkhall on the Balmoral Estate in Aberdeenshire on Saturday.

In traditional skirts and shirts, they performed the "lakalaka," a festival of life that usually marks formal occasions, Clarence House said.

Charles was presented with a whale tooth known as tabua, a sacred Fijian cultural relic, from Sergeant Lawaci.

The Prince of Wales watched as Fijian soldiers at Birkhall on the Balmoral Estate in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, performed traditional dances and songs to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the former Crown Colony's independence

Five Fijians from The Black Watch, Third Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, dressed in traditional skirts and shirts, to the & # 39; Lakalaka & # 39; perform.

Five Fijians from The Black Watch, Third Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland, dressed in traditional skirts and shirts, to the & # 39; Lakalaka & # 39; perform.

Charles was presented with a whale tooth known as tabua, a sacred Fijian cultural relic, from Sergeant Lawaci

Charles was presented with a whale tooth known as tabua, a sacred Fijian cultural relic, from Sergeant Lawaci

Seargeant Lawaci was awarded the Queen's Gallantry Medal in 2005 for his services to Iraq.

During the event, Charles looked back on a visit to Fiji in 1970 for the original independence ceremony.

He said: “I have fond memories of my visit to Suva in 1970 when I represented Her Majesty the Queen at the independence ceremony in Fiji.

"I was so deeply moved by the warmth of the Fijian welcome – the festive traditional ceremonies, the music, the dance and the remarkable hospitality that was offered to me."

Charles speaks to soldiers remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic. Picture from left: Sergeant Lawaci, Corporal Ratumaisese, Lance Corporal Vunibobo, Lance Corporal Gasaucalayawa and Private Vakadewabuka

Charles speaks to soldiers remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic. Picture from left: Sergeant Lawaci, Corporal Ratumaisese, Lance Corporal Vunibobo, Lance Corporal Gasaucalayawa and Private Vakadewabuka

Seargeant Lawaci was awarded the Queen's Gallantry Medal in 2005 for his services to Iraq

Seargeant Lawaci was awarded the Queen's Gallantry Medal in 2005 for his services to Iraq

The Prince of Wales also saw a recorded performance at Fort George by Fijian soldiers who could not attend and who danced "raude".

The Prince of Wales also saw a recorded performance at Fort George by Fijian soldiers who could not attend and who danced "raude".

The Prince of Wales also watched a recorded performance at Fort George by Fijian soldiers who were unable to attend and who danced "raude".

The Raude is a fan dance that tells the story of a researcher on an expedition across the equator.

The performance at Balmoral was socially distant due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Prince Charles is currently at Balmoral after the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh traveled briefly to Sandringham last month.

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