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Prime Minister unveils plan to bring Britain back to normal after the coronavirus crisis


Boris Johnson is on a collision course with his scientists as he prepares to unveil a nine-month plan to make Britain almost normal again.

In a major intervention tomorrow, the Prime Minister will set out his vision for reviving the economy while living with the corona virus threat.

The plan provides for a £ 3 billion fund to "make the NHS ready for the winter in the face of fears of a deadly second wave."

In a major intervention tomorrow, the Prime Minister will set out his vision for reviving the economy while living with the corona virus threat

Mr. Johnson will launch an action to bring millions of office workers back to their desks, including general advice on working from home and avoiding public transportation.

He will also set up a “targeted” schedule for lifting social distancing measures, but he expects it will take nine months before we can return to a more normal life.

The Prime Minister is expected to set a new target of 500,000 tests per day to combat the flare-up, as reported by The Sun.

And he will unveil plans for "lightning bolts" to stop the virus from spreading.

The councils are expected to be empowered to close pubs and cafes without first going to the government.

The rules could even allow city councilors to ban weddings and other gatherings at short notice.

A government health source told the sun, "The councils will be able to put lighting barriers where they see fit."

However, the steps follow the public and private opposition of its scientific experts.

Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's chief scientific advisor, told MPs yesterday that there is "absolutely no reason" to drop the council for work from home, which the Prime Minister believes is crippling the economy of the city and city center .

In addition, Sir Patrick called for social distancing to continue and said Britain was "at a time when distancing is important". He also said experts had advised the government that the ban should take place about a week before it was imposed – a delay that could have cost thousands of lives.

Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty is also said to feel "very uncomfortable" when it comes to simplifying social distance rules. Professor Whitty has previously suggested that measures, such as advice to stay at least a meter or two apart, will be required before a vaccine is developed.

The Prime Minister will acknowledge the danger of a second wave this winter. Sources said he was determined to avoid the fate of several U.S. states where cases of the virus skyrocket after restrictions were eased too quickly.

The plan provides for a £ 3 billion fund to "make the NHS ready for the winter in the face of fears of a deadly second wave." Above, mass tests in Blackburn, Lancashire, nearing a local lock

The plan provides for a £ 3 billion fund to "make the NHS ready for the winter in the face of fears of a deadly second wave." Above, mass tests in Blackburn, Lancashire, nearing a local lock

The £ 3 billion NHS package includes cash for the largest flu vaccination program in history and an effort to dramatically increase testing capacity to half a million a day by the end of October.

The measures are designed to reduce the risk of flu and ensure that there is enough capacity to test all people with cold symptoms that are similar to those of the coronavirus.

The NHS will also receive cash to keep the Nightingale hospitals network open through late March, and pay private hospitals to provide additional capacity as it prepares to deal with the coronavirus threat while coping with an outbreak of winter flu becomes.

Protective equipment such as masks and robes are also being rebuilt.

A spokesman # 10 said, "The Prime Minister realizes that this is not the time for complacency, and we need to make sure our NHS is ready for the winter."

However, it is expected that Mr. Johnson will officially drop the official “Work From Home If You Can” guidelines that have applied since the block began in March.

It is replaced by guidelines calling on employers to work with their employees to help them get back to work gradually, if possible.

Millions of office workers have been working from home for months, but ministers are increasingly concerned about the slow pace of their return as the blockade has waned. In many cities, there are fears that shops and restaurants will be taken out of business if office staff don't return.

In a shift in focus last week, Mr. Johnson said people should "start working now if you can."

To the frustration of Tory MPs, the official instructions for working from home have been preserved, making it difficult for employers to get employees back to their desks. Senior Tory MP Sir Graham Brady said the government's "blanket advice" should be dropped because it "doesn't take security into account." He added: & # 39; This whole mixed news business is very harmful.

"Many employers have made tremendous efforts to keep their jobs safe, but if they try to get employees to return, the worker can refer to government orders that they should work from home."

A Whitehall source confirmed that official guidelines would be cleaned up to reflect the Prime Minister's message about returning to work.

The measures are designed to reduce the risk of flu and ensure that there is enough capacity to test all people with cold symptoms that are similar to those of the coronavirus

The measures are designed to reduce the risk of flu and ensure that there is enough capacity to test all people with cold symptoms that are similar to those of the coronavirus

But Sir Patrick said to MPs: “Of the various distancing measures, working from home remains a perfectly good option for many companies as it is easy.

“I think a number of companies believe that this doesn't affect productivity. And in this situation there is absolutely no reason why I can change it. & # 39;

Downing Street declined to comment on Sir Patrick's intervention, but former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said the prime minister must override his scientists for economic reasons.

Sir Iain said: “Scientists completely misunderstood it from start to finish. Most of them have never run a business and it is not their job to tell employers how best to manage their employees. There is an urgent need to get people back to work and to their offices – otherwise our city centers will die. & # 39;

Downing Street declined to respond to the Prime Minister's plan to reduce social detachment, but Whitehall sources said it was "very limited" that the virus would continue to decline.