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Prime Minister faces major Tory revolt on coronavirus


Boris Johnson pleaded with mutinous Tories to support the "compelling" case for its new levels today under the pretext of backroom deals and promises.

The Prime Minister made a compromise when he opened the debate ahead of a crunch vote tonight. Up to 100 people believed they were ready to rebel.

In an important signal, he insisted that the government was "sensitive" to local situations – suggesting areas with low infection rates will no longer be merged with other nearby hotspots. He said the next review on December 16 will be conducted on the basis of "as many detailed details as possible". "We will try to be as sensitive as possible to local efforts and local successes," he said.

He also announced that "wet" pubs – who rely on drinks for a living – will be entitled to payments of £ 1,000 to get through this month.

But Mr Johnson has faced a series of hostile interventions from his own banks over draconian restrictions that will leave 99 percent of England below the toughest two levels as of tomorrow. And Sir Keir Starmer warned MPs that their downgrade hopes will be dashed as Tier 2 will "fight" to contain infection and Mr. Johnson always "over-promises and under-delivers". "That won't happen," he wiped off.

The Prime Minister was exposed after Sir Keir announced that Labor would abstain from the vote tonight – a decision Mr Johnson described in the House as "exceptional". This means that the extent of the rebellion will not be masked by the support of the opposition, although the government is still guaranteed victory as not enough will switch sides to overthrow the vast majority of Mr Johnson.

Many Tories remained angry when ministers eventually released an impact assessment of the measures only to find that it did not contain any new details. Mark Harper, ringleader of the rebels, said the "wheels would break away from politics".

The government is assumed to have another dashboard that provides more detailed information on 40 sectors of the economy. Sources rejected the idea that it was "secret", saying that it only contains material that is already "publicly available" – although they insisted it not be published. A disgruntled MP told MailOnline, "The reason it isn't published is because it supports our case, not theirs."

MEPs said whips have pledged Conservatives with higher-level constituencies they will be downgraded within weeks, while London Tories is pushing for a pledge not to upgrade the city to Tier 3.

Mr. Johnson explained his case that the new regional levels are “imperative” and emphasized, “This is not another lockdown. Nor is this the renewal of existing measures in England.

“The levels I am proposing would mean that starting tomorrow, anyone in England, including those in Tier 3, can leave their homes for whatever reason.

"And when they do that, they'll find that the shops are open for Christmas, the hairdressers are open, the nail bars are open, gyms, leisure centers, and swimming pools are open."

On the hospitality sector, Mr Johnson reeled off a list of previously announced support before telling MPs that a "one-off" payment of £ 1,000 will be made to "wet" pubs in December to appreciate "how badly they are hit." were "caught by this virus in what is usually their busiest month.

In other coronavirus news:

  • Cabinet Minister Michael Gove said two Scottish eggs were "an appetizer" 24 hours after Environment Secretary George Eustice said one was an essential meal for buying alcohol in Level 2 pubs, but Mr Gove added to the confusion to say later that it could also be used as the main meal;
  • Sir Keir Starmer has been accused of "politics" in the middle of the pandemic after ordering his MPs to suspend the decisive vote tonight on the rules intended to replace the lockdown.
  • Mr Gove has denied that Britons need "immunity certificates" to go to the pub – despite a colleague who raised the prospect of them yesterday;
  • Mr Gove pointed to Wales as an example of how a lockdown should not be carried out after it was announced that pubs would have to close from 6 p.m. and that alcohol beverages would no longer be allowed to sell as of Friday as the country was only a few weeks after the end of the "Fire break" stands in front of new curbs.
  • The UK recorded just 12,330 coronavirus infections yesterday on the lowest Monday toll since September.

Keir Starmer

Boris Johnson (left) said there was a "compelling case" for the regional levels as he faced a Commons showdown over his new coronavirus rules. But Keir Starmer (right) warned Tories, hoping they will be downgraded within 14 days: "That won't happen."

Whips are trying to speak to around 100 Conservatives on the verge of joining the mutiny, with anger that only 1 percent of England is the lowest level of restrictions, despite few or no infections in many Level 3 areas

Whips are trying to speak to around 100 Conservatives on the verge of joining the mutiny, with anger that only 1 percent of England is the lowest level of restrictions, despite few or no infections in many Level 3 areas

Only 18 municipalities see Covid cases increasing

Only eighteen authorities in England have seen a surge in Covid-19 cases in the past week. This comes from official figures that question whether 99 percent of the country needs to be in the toughest two stages of lockdown.

Only eight areas – Ashford, Dover, Folkestone and Hythe, Maidstone, Medway, Tonbridge and Malling, Boston in Lincolnshire and South Ribble in Lancashire – have Tier 3 restrictions that require all pubs, bars and restaurants to close.

The other areas that have seen an increase in infections – Mendip, Torridge, Surrey Heath, Woking, Basildon, Harlow, Ipswich, North Norfolk, Peterborough and Waltham Forest – fall under the second severest category. Residents living in Tier 2 are not allowed to mix with other households indoors.

This means that the other 297 subordinate authorities in England, home to around 53 million people, saw a decrease in coronavirus cases in the seven-day period ending November 25, the last week of data.

Although Public Health England data shows Covid outbreaks are declining in the rest of the country, 55 million people will be living in either Tier 2 or Tier 3 if the national lockdown ends tomorrow.

Challenged by a number of MPs – including former Cabinet Secretary Greg Clark, who represents Tunbridge Wells – for the harsh treatment of their areas, Mr Johnson said: “Going forward, the government will look at how we can think as closely as possible to the reality what is happening locally for the local people, the incidence of the disease, the human geography and spread of the pandemic, and the advances the areas are making in fighting the virus.

"We will try to be as sensitive as possible to local efforts and local successes to bring the pandemic under control."

He added, "We will be investigating the local incidents in detail, examining the human geography of the pandemic and carefully considering what happens every two weeks as I say."

Mr Johnson also targeted Labor "having no credible plan" to fight the coronavirus.

He said, “We are trying to run pubs, restaurants and shops across the country and no one feels the fear of these companies more than this government.

“However, I find it extraordinary that, despite the criticism we have, we do not have a credible plan from the opposing party; in fact, we have no view of the way forward.

"It's a pretty extraordinary thing that tonight (Sir Keir), who said he would always act in the national interest, told his party to sit on their hands and abstain from the vote tonight."

Lockdown skeptic Tories met earlier to discuss their stance on the vote.

A senior backbencher said it was looking for the best deal before deciding which voting route to take. "There will be talks," they explained their approach. “You don't commit one way or the other. Once you make a commitment, they'll stop talking to you. & # 39;

Others accused the government's whips of desperately trying to raise expectations of the scale of the rebellion so that it seemed less dramatic. Around 30 MPs resisted the whip in the last lockdown vote. "The only people who say over 100 are government whips," said one MP. "If there are more than 50, the government has not done well."

Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove was sent on the air to defend the government's position. He warned the re-lockdown in Wales, just weeks after the curbs, "what happens if you pull the shackles too far".

Mr Gove said he was "confident how confident it can be" that there does not need to be a third national lockdown in England.

But he risked fueling the backlash by saying that if the NHS were overwhelmed by the NHS, people would not do "Christmas shopping" because the government had not taken strong action.

Considered one of the leading "pigeons" in the Cabinet, Mr Gove also admitted that he wanted to plunge London straight into Tier 3. He was overruled by Mr. Johnson for fear of losing 500,000 jobs.

"It's always easier to move an area from a harder to a lower level," he told Sky News.

Keir Starmer is accused of “making politics” in a pandemic after ordering Labor MPs to go ABSTAIN levels in the crucial vote

Sir Keir Starmer has been accused of "making politics" in the middle of the pandemic after ordering his MPs to hold a decisive vote tonight on the rules intended to replace the lockdown.

Labor will abstain from the Commons vote on whether to adopt the stiffened three-tier system desired by the government. This will expose Tory's fault lines on the division.

But the move, revealed late at night, will also allow Sir Keir to calm a rebellion on his own benches.

Some MPs from northern areas, classified in the strictest Level 3, were angry that the party initially announced that it would vote with the government.

The abstention means that despite a violent Tory rebellion over the economic threat they believe poses the stairs, the government will almost certainly win the vote.

The Prime Minister has failed to quell the growing anger on his own benches over the draconian restrictions that will leave 99 percent of England below the toughest two levels as of tomorrow.

Following Sir Kier's announcement, a Number 10 spokesman said: “This pandemic is one of the greatest challenges the country has faced in decades and Labor has chosen to abstain.

“While Keir Starmer claims he is offering a new tour, it is clear to everyone that he is actually not offering any leadership at all.

"Keir Starmer is playing politics in the middle of a global pandemic rather than working with the government to find a way through this difficult time for the British people."

Commenting on the additional dossier on economic details, Mr. Gove said, “The evidence I understand in this dashboard is largely from the ONS and other publicly available statistical databases, as well as reports from business agency organizations … (it) is based on publicly available information. "

Mr Gove paused to completely rule out another blanket lockdown, but said the new levels should be enough to avoid one.

He told Sky News, "I'm so confident we won't need any because the levels we have now are pretty robust."

When asked if he could rule out another lockdown, Mr Gove said, “In politics you can never rule anything out, but as I said, given the rigor with which these new levels are being applied, I'm pretty confident that we can can prevent national blocking.

“However, I'm afraid that if we eased the situation too quickly we would have the situation we have had in some other countries and indeed in Wales where the brakes have to be put on again. & # 39;

Mr Gove said he "sympathized" with the Tory rebel concerns and admitted that the restrictions were "painful".

"There are some, and I sympathize with them, who say the current tiering system is too strict and too strict," he said.

“I don't think I think there is a need to keep the infection rate down, to reduce it wherever possible, so that people can be together for Christmas.

"It's a balance and it's not easy, but while these restrictions on our freedoms are painful, they go against the grain for me, they are there to make sure our NHS is not overwhelmed."

Mr Gove said Wales showed the risks when they lifted restrictions "too expansively".

Wales is rolling out new national restrictions starting Friday evening, including a ban on selling alcohol in pubs and a 6pm curfew after infection rates have risen steadily since the end of a 17-day “fire” on November 9th.

The Cabinet Minister told BBC Breakfast: “I understand very well the difficulties facing the Welsh Government.

“But in retrospect, it looks like they lifted the restrictions too far immediately after their two-week lockdown.

As a result, the virus got out of control again and had to hit the brakes again.

Mr Johnson has faced a series of hostile interventions from his own banks over draconian restrictions that will leave 99 percent of England below the toughest two levels as of tomorrow

Mr Johnson has faced a series of hostile interventions from his own banks over draconian restrictions that will leave 99 percent of England below the toughest two levels as of tomorrow

The government's economic assessment last night included charts from last week's OBR report - but no new detailed analysis of the economic outlook

The government's economic assessment last night included charts from last week's OBR report – but no new detailed analysis of the economic outlook

MPs told MailOnline Whips that they are reassuring high-constituency Conservatives that they will be downgraded at the first review on December 16. PIctured, Chief Whip Mark Spencer on his way to the cabinet this morning

MPs told MailOnline Whips that they are reassuring high-constituency Conservatives that they will be downgraded at the first review on December 16. PIctured, Chief Whip Mark Spencer on his way to the cabinet this morning

Michael Gove

Cabinet Office Minister Michael Gove (left) has been sent on the air to defend the government's position. He warned the re-lockdown in Wales, just weeks after the curbs, "what happens if you pull the shackles too far". . Sir Keir Starmer (right) decided to abstain from voting in the crunch vote today

"That's one of the reasons we're cautiously exiting the suspension (in England)."

He added: "The example of Wales shows what can happen if you lift restrictions too soon too blanket."

Sir Keir, who has supported government action throughout the pandemic, said it was not in the national interest to vote the restrictions if the coronavirus was still a "serious risk" to the public.

But his party's decision not to actively support the government has put Mr Johnson on hold on his own MPs, with little evidence that No. 10's dossier on the social and economic consequences of the tiered system suppressed a rebellion that resulted in up to 100 conservatives could vote against the measures.

Numerous Tories have furiously referred to Downing Street's 48-page document as whitewash and cut-and-paste after insisting that it has not been able to measure how the three-tier system will affect the economies of local areas.

The final dossier was based on publicly available information. The economic impact section was derived from an impact analysis of the pandemic published last week by the Office of Budgetary Responsibility (OBR).

Senior Tories blew up the "rushed" document containing typing errors. One claimed that the Prime Minister decided not to publish an economic forecast "because he found the wrong answer".

Mel Stride, Tory Chair of the Commons Treasury Committee, said: “It is frustrating that little is given here about how the different levels could affect specific sectors and regions across the country. Those looking for additional economic analysis of the new tiered system will have difficulty finding it in this document. & # 39;

Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Committee of Tory MPs, confirmed last night that he would vote against the government's plans.

Former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith accused ministers of "cut and paste" suggesting that no economic analysis had been conducted prior to the assignment of the levels.

Mr Harper, head of the Covid Recovery Group of lockdown-skeptical Tory MPs, questioned the NHS threat figures in the document.

"We have repeatedly asked for information in support of these hospital projections and it has not been made public," he tweeted.

"We are now seeing again that the wheels are deviating from the arguments of the government."

At a # 10 press conference yesterday, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said he hoped some areas could be moved to lower levels when the restrictions become known for their first fortnightly review on December 16. However, government scholars have made it clear that they see little scope for widespread application to wane before Christmas.

According to Gove, Wales was forced to ban pubs selling alcohol again because it subsided "too far" after the fire

Michael Gove said Wales' new lockdown shows what happens when governments relax restrictions "too far".

The Cabinet Office Minister risked aggravating tensions when he cited the British nation as an example of how to deal with coronavirus.

Welsh pubs have to close at 6 p.m. and are banned from selling alcoholic beverages as of Friday as the country has been under a new lockdown just weeks after the last one ended.

First Minister Mark Drakeford yesterday outlined a number of measures for the hospitality sector after the number of coronavirus infections rose sharply, particularly among those under 25.

From Friday, pubs, bars and restaurants may only stay open until 6 p.m. and then serve as snack bars. And they are not allowed to serve alcoholic beverages on a Scottish schedule for weeks.

As part of the new program, cinemas, bowling alleys, and other indoor entertainment will also be closed, but non-essential retail stores, hairdressers, gyms, and leisure centers may remain open.

The move took place after the previous lockdown between October 23rd and November 9th. When this ended, people were allowed to meet in groups of up to four people in places such as pubs and restaurants with no alcohol sales before 6 p.m. and 10.20 p.m. curfew.

Up to 15 people were also allowed to take part in an "organized indoor activity" such as an exercise class, and people who were not strictly needed were reopened.

In the past 10 days, coronavirus cases have risen from 160 per 100,000 to 210 per 100,000, a 31 percent increase.

This could mean that most areas of England will start the New Year on one of the toughest two tiers, with a ban on indoor mixing and strict hospitality controls. Only the Isle of Wight, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly have been designated for the lightest Tier 1 restrictions.

Sir Keir explained his decision to order Labor to abstain from voting in today's Commons vote: "Coronavirus remains a serious threat to public health. Therefore Labor accepts the need for continued restrictions." We will always act in the national interest so that we do not vote against these restrictions tomorrow in Parliament.

However, I remain deeply concerned that the Boris Johnson administration has failed to use this recent lockdown to develop a credible health and economic plan.

“We still don't have a working testing system, the public health news is confused, and companies across the country are calling for more effective economic support to get them through the winter months.

& # 39; It is the short term government incompetence that is causing long term damage to the UK economy. It is imperative that the government get control of the virus so that our NHS can be protected and our economy recovered faster. & # 39;

In response, the government accused Sir Keir of "making politics" in the middle of the pandemic. "This pandemic is one of the greatest challenges the country has faced in decades and Labor has chosen to abstain," said a No. 10 spokesman.

“While Keir Starmer claims he is offering a new tour, it is clear to everyone that he is actually not offering any leadership at all.

"Keir Starmer is playing politics in the middle of a global pandemic rather than working with the government to find a way through this difficult time for the British people."

Whips are trying to speak to around 100 Conservatives on the verge of joining the mutiny, with anger that just 1 percent of England are on the lowest level of restrictions as of Wednesday, with many areas in Tier 3 despite having seen few or fewer infections . Concessions like a renewal date in February and more money for pubs and restaurants have already been offered.

However, the call for a rethink has been compounded by further evidence that the UK's outbreak is rapidly waning. Only 12,330 Covid-19 infections were recorded in the lowest Monday toll since September.

During a visit to pharmaceutical company Wockhardt at its North Wales facility, Johnson said England's lockdown brought the disease under control, with the R number – a measure of how quickly the virus spreads – below 1.

He said, “We cannot afford to take our foot off the animal's throat, take our foot off the gas, we cannot afford to get it out of control.

& # 39; The tiering system is tough, but it was designed to be tough and to keep it under control. I know a lot of people think they are at the wrong level and I understand people's frustration.

“I particularly understand the frustration of the hospitality industry that has been through and gone through so much over the past few months and we will do whatever we can to protect and nurture this sector over the weeks and months to come. & # 39;

But Mel Stride, the Tory finance committee chairman, criticized the documents.

"On several occasions I have asked the Chancellor and Finance Officials to publish an analysis of the economic impact of the three levels," he said.

& # 39; With just over 24 hours for MPs to vote on the new tiered system, this revised document offers little more economically than what the OBR released last week. It is frustrating that little is given here about how the different levels might affect specific sectors and regions across the country.

Sturgeon says she won't have an indoor Christmas with her family this year

Nicola Sturgeon has announced that she won't be celebrating Christmas with the family indoors this year.

Despite signing a UK easing for the festive season, the Scottish First Minister said she did not want to "endanger" her family.

Usually for Christmas, my husband and I have our two families here in our own house. We won't do that this year, ”she said.

“I haven't seen my parents since July and I would love to see them today and this Christmas, but I don't want to put them at risk when a vaccine is so close.

"We might go out for a family walk somewhere, but the idea … of having a Christmas dinner at home is something we won't be doing this year."

"Anyone looking for an additional economic analysis of the new tiered system will have difficulty finding it in this document."

Matt Hancock said in a meeting on Downing Street that he hoped MPs from "all parties" would support the proposals. The health minister also said it was possible that some parts of the country could be downgraded to a lower level when the measures are first reviewed on December 16.

He said, "Of course you have to take into account that Christmas is approaching, but if the fall rates drop as they are – they've dropped almost a third in the last week – we'll definitely look around and see in every area." what the right level is for this area. & # 39;

MailOnline's analysis of the official data found that only four NHS trusts in England are currently busier than they were at this time last year – despite warnings, the healthcare system would be paralyzed by coronavirus without the revised three-tier lockdown system.

Michael Gove sparked anger over the weekend claiming that without the government's new government restrictions from Covid-19, any hospital in England would be "physically overwhelmed" as he tried to convince MPs and the public to pull the brutal curbs To support.

The numbers from NHS England paint a completely different picture, however: there are thousands more hospital beds available this year than last winter.

For the week ending November 22, an average of 77,942 of 88,903 (87.7 percent) available beds across the country were occupied. This is the most recent snapshot. Diese Zahl berücksichtigt nicht die Schichtkapazität bei eingemotteten Nachtigallen oder die Tausenden von Betten, die vom privaten Sektor kommandiert wurden.

Zum Vergleich: Während des siebentägigen Zeitraums, der am 8. Dezember 2019 endete – das sind die vergleichbarsten Daten, die für den letzten Winter verfügbar waren – lag die Auslastung im Durchschnitt bei 94,9 Prozent, als rund 91.733 aller 96.675 verfügbaren Betten voll waren.

Großbritannien verzeichnete heute nur 12.330 Covid-19-Infektionen bei der niedrigsten Zahl am Montag seit September, da Boris Johnson angesichts wachsender Beweise dafür, dass sich die zweite Welle zurückzieht, einer wachsenden Rebellion über das drakonische New-Tier-System von No10 gegenübersteht

Großbritannien verzeichnete heute nur 12.330 Covid-19-Infektionen bei der niedrigsten Zahl am Montag seit September, da Boris Johnson angesichts wachsender Beweise dafür, dass sich die zweite Welle zurückzieht, einer wachsenden Rebellion über das drakonische New-Tier-System von No10 gegenübersteht

In der Woche zum 22. November waren im Durchschnitt 77.942 von 88.903 (87,7 Prozent) verfügbaren Betten im ganzen Land belegt. Dies ist der jüngste Schnappschuss. Zum Vergleich: Während des siebentägigen Zeitraums, der am 8. Dezember 2019 endete - das sind die vergleichbarsten Daten, die für den letzten Winter verfügbar waren - lag die Auslastung im Durchschnitt bei 94,9 Prozent, als rund 91.733 aller 96.675 verfügbaren Betten voll waren

In der Woche zum 22. November waren im Durchschnitt 77.942 von 88.903 (87,7 Prozent) verfügbaren Betten im ganzen Land belegt. Dies ist der jüngste Schnappschuss. Zum Vergleich: Während des siebentägigen Zeitraums, der am 8. Dezember 2019 endete – das sind die vergleichbarsten Daten, die für den letzten Winter verfügbar waren – lag die Auslastung im Durchschnitt bei 94,9 Prozent, als rund 91.733 aller 96.675 verfügbaren Betten voll waren

Nur vier Trusts – der Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust (FT), der University College London Hospitals FT, Calderdale und Huddersfield FT sowie Wrightington, Wigan und Leigh FT – sind heute stärker beschäftigt als vor einem Jahr

Von den Trusts, die dieses Jahr am meisten beschäftigt sind, sehen nur Wrightington, Wigan und Leigh insgesamt mehr Patienten als im letzten Winter

Es ist wahr, dass fast ein Drittel der englischen Krankenhäuser derzeit mehr Covid-Patienten sehen als auf dem Höhepunkt der Krise im April. Insgesamt leben in englischen Krankenhäusern immer noch 4.000 Menschen weniger als Mitte April

Es ist wahr, dass fast ein Drittel der englischen Krankenhäuser derzeit mehr Covid-Patienten sehen als auf dem Höhepunkt der Krise im April. Insgesamt leben in englischen Krankenhäusern immer noch 4.000 Menschen weniger als Mitte April

Premierminister gestikuliert, während er während einer virtuellen Pressekonferenz in der Downing Street spricht

Premierminister gestikuliert, während er während einer virtuellen Pressekonferenz in der Downing Street spricht

Tory Wut über Datenmangel

Der Mangel an Informationen über die Auswirkungen von Sperren auf die Wirtschaft hat die Mitglieder der Tory-Partei "frustriert".

Mehr als drei Viertel der Befragten waren sich nicht einig, dass die Regierung ausreichende Gesundheits- und Wirtschaftsinformationen zur Verfügung gestellt hat, um es den Menschen zu ermöglichen, „eine ausgewogene Bewertung der Risiken vorzunehmen“.

Drei von fünf waren sich einig, dass sich die Minister stärker auf die Unterstützung kleiner Unternehmen konzentrieren sollten.

Die Umfrage unter 2.800 Mitgliedern wurde von der Basisgruppe Conservative Voice in Auftrag gegeben.

Ein Befragter sagte: „Wir wollen eine konservative Regierung, nicht all den aufgewachten Unsinn, der immer wieder abgepumpt wird.

"Boris muss sich mehr wissenschaftliche Meinungen anhören."

Nur vier Trusts – der Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust (FT), der University College London Hospitals FT, Calderdale und Huddersfield FT sowie Wrightington, Wigan und Leigh FT – sind heute beschäftigter als vor einem Jahr.

In Cambridge, 769 of 823 beds were full (93.4 per cent) on average in the week ending November 22, compared to 883 out of 956 (92.5 per cent) last winter.

Calderdale and Huddersfield was at 93.3 per cent capacity last week, with 499 out of 535 beds filled, slightly higher than the 92 per cent last December, when 596 of 648 beds were in use.

Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust is almost at full capacity, with 98.7 per cent of its 335 beds occupied. But that figure is still only marginally higher than the 96 per cent from last year.

While University College London was 89.2 per cent full last December compared to 93 per cent last week.

Dr Karol Sikora, a consultant oncologist and professor of medicine at the University of Buckingham, said Downing Street was running a 'brainwashing PR campaign' with 'data that doesn't stack up'.

He told MailOnline: 'We've gone back to how it started in March, with (the Government) claiming we need the measures to protect the NHS. The data you've shown me proves that it doesn't need protecting. It's dealing with Covid very well indeed.

'What the data shows is that hospitals are not working at full capacity and they've still got some spare beds for Covid if necessary. The public is being misled, the data doesn't stack up. Fear and scaremongering is being used to keep people out of hospital.'

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