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Politicians, experts and friends of royals reclaim The Crown Fiction Disclaimer


A powerful coalition of politicians, royal experts and a close friend of Prince Charles backed Netflix's call last night to broadcast a disclaimer warning The Crown viewers that many key scenes never happened or distort the truth.

The streaming giant has come under increasing criticism for fabricating a number of controversial incidents in the hit drama’s latest series. He warns that manipulating real events could harm the future of the monarchy.

The Mail launches a campaign today on Sunday to demand that Netflix make it clear to its millions of viewers that The Crown's storylines twist the truth and present fiction as fact.

It comes when Earl Spencer, Princess Diana's brother, said he was uncomfortable seeing his sister's portrayal in the drama, and feared that viewers would "forget that it is fiction". These disclaimer support calls include:

A powerful coalition of politicians, royal experts and a close friend of Prince Charles backed Netflix's call last night to broadcast a disclaimer warning The Crown viewers that many key scenes never happened or are distorting the truth

  • Lady Glenconner – Princess Margaret's waiting lady for more than 30 years and a friend of Prince Charles – who revealed that a scene she portrayed in the previous series was "completely wrong";
  • Julian Fellowes, creator of Downton Abbey, who specifically reminded producers of The Crown that they represent the lives of "real people";
  • Former Culture Secretary Karen Bradley said it was "important" that each episode include a "health warning" that some events were "beautified".
  • General Sir Richard Dannatt, a former chief of the British Army, warned: "There is a real risk that history will be rewritten."

The Crown's fourth series, released last Sunday, covers the years between Lord Mountbatt's assassination by the IRA in 1979 and the overthrow of Margaret Thatcher in 1990. Much of it focuses on Charles' damn marriage with Diana and perceived tension in the relationship between the Queen and Mrs. Thatcher.

The series falsely suggests that Charles and Camilla's affair continued throughout his marriage to Diana. In fact, Charles had virtually no contact with Camilla for the first five years of their marriage in 1981.

In a fictional scene in the first episode, Lord Mountbatten writes to warn Charles that he is in danger of "ruining and disappointing the family", while the third episode incorrectly shows Mrs. Thatcher being humiliated by the Balmoral royal family becomes.

The series falsely suggests that Charles and Camilla's affair continued throughout his marriage to Diana

The series falsely suggests that Charles and Camilla's affair continued throughout his marriage to Diana

The MoS last week revealed how friends of Charles had accused the drama producers of "trolling on a Hollywood budget".

Peter Morgan, the creator of the crown, defended scenes, adding, "Sometimes you have to give up accuracy, but you must never give up the truth."

However, Hugo Vickers, a leading royal historian and writer on The Crown Dissected, said it was "absolutely important" to display a disclaimer at the beginning of each episode warning viewers that the show is fictionalized.

The facts are twisted and the truth becomes a warped lie

"Peter Morgan says he brings incidents together, which is understandable, but he also twists the facts, turning the truth into something so skewed that it becomes an outright lie," he added.

Lord Fellowes also questioned the way The Crown portrays the royal family, saying, "I don't really like commenting on the work of others … but in this case, I can't help but feel like that the very brilliant program makers sometimes forget that they are real people and they are leading real lives. & # 39;

The Tory Peer-sponsored call to Netflix to make it clear that fact is mixed with fiction.

He said, "I don't really understand why not because many programs based on truthful events have a disclaimer at the beginning that says some events were brought together and some characters were made up for dramatic purposes." That's very common – you see it at the top of many, many programs. "

In a made-up scene in the first episode, Lord Mountbatten writes to warn Charles that he is in danger of "ruining and disappointing" the family

In a fictional scene in the first episode, Lord Mountbatten writes to warn Charles that he is in danger of "ruining and disappointing" the family

Princess Margaret is featured in one episode of the new series being rude to Mrs. Thatcher, and in another episode she is irritated when Diana's entry into a room interrupts her while she is telling a story.

Lady Glenconner, Princess Margaret's waiting lady between 1971 and 2002, stressed yesterday evening that she had not seen the latest series, but that such a portrayal of her friend was "unfair".

All of these hit shows like to do it …

Dozens of popular dramas, including one produced by the same company behind The Crown, contain disclaimers.

The ITV series quiz on how Charles Ingram cheated on his way to winning Who Wants To Be A Millionaire makes it clear to viewers that some scenes were made up.

Each episode produced by Left Bank Pictures, which also does The Crown, begins: “This drama is based on real events. Some incidents and characters have been changed for dramatic reasons. "

Other non-liability dramas include the BBC's Responsible Child, the story of a 12-year-old boy charged with murder as an adult, and ITV's Honor, based on the "honor killing" of Banaz Mahmod.

According to regulator Ofcom, shows should "not unfairly depict facts, events, individuals or organizations".

However, Netflix, which reviews The Crown, is regulated by the Dutch regulator as its European headquarters are in the Netherlands.

"They just do what they want and of course there are a lot of people who think it's true," she said.

The 88-year-old was portrayed in a fictional scene in the third series in which Margaret mistakenly met her future boyfriend Roddy Llewellyn at a pool party.

They actually met over tea at Cafe Royal in Edinburgh.

Christopher Warwick, Princess Margaret's authorized biographer, raised concerns that the current series could damage Charles and Camilla's reputations.

In January, Netflix announced that 73 million households worldwide have seen The Crown since it launched in 2016.

Clive Irving, a US-based royal writer, said that many Americans regard the events depicted in The Crown as "the truth of the gospel."

Princess Diana's brother Earl Spencer told ITV's Alan Titchmarsh, “I think Americans tell me they saw The Crown like they had a history lesson. Well, they don't. "

Lord Dannatt, who had signed a contract with the press to enable Prince Harry to serve in Afghanistan, said: "Not only is it unfair to give credibility to a false belief, it is also potentially harmful to the monarchy and therefore incorrect. "

Ingrid Seward, editor-in-chief of Majesty magazine, criticized a scene in the second episode in which The Queen allowed Mrs. Thatcher to accompany her stalking on the Balmoral estate in a light blue coat with matching handbag and scarf.

“The queen doesn't like to humiliate people. It just couldn't be further from the truth in a million years. "

Karen Bradley, Minister of Culture in Theresa May's administration, said it was "important" that every episode of The Crown contain a "health warning" that it was not being strictly true to the facts … and that some events were dramatic embellished and even invented. .

Lord Forsyth, a minister in the administrations of Mrs. Thatcher and John Major, said the crown was "barely a step from spitting image and full of errors and inventions".

Angela Levin, a biographer of Prince Harry, said Netflix has a "moral duty" to wear a disclaimer, while Dickie Arbiter, the Queen's former press secretary, said a disclaimer should be read during the opening titles of each episode.

Netflix and Peter Morgan declined to comment.