TECHNOLOGY

Police arrest four teenagers for killing model railroads


The chairman of the model railroad club, whose exhibition was destroyed by vandals, has vowed that it will "rise from the ashes" after the well-wishers donated £ 85,000 after the shocking incident.

Peter Davies, 70, said the members of the Market Deeping Model Railway Club were "overwhelmed" by the generosity of the public and would use the money to help other clubs improve their safety and prevent anything similar from happening in the future .

Police arrested and released four boys – one aged 16 and three aged 15 – for damage to the "priceless" exhibit at Stamford Welland Academy, Lincolnshire.

Prominent model railroad enthusiasts like Sir Rod Stewart and Pete Waterman donate among others. Sir Rod gives the club £ 10,000 after saying he "felt her pain".

70-year-old Davies said exhibits were smashed, thrown around and stamped, including a locomotive worth around £ 8,500.

Other enthusiasts lost hundreds of items – including handcrafted pieces – that took decades to build and assemble. The total cost of the damage was tens of thousands of pounds.

Tens of thousands of pounds of exhibits were destroyed after vandals broke into a school in Lincolnshire and smashed models from the Market Deeping Model Railway Club

Club chairman Peter Davies, on the far right, said they would rise from the ashes after the vandalism and the members were from the £ 85,000 donated so far

Club chairman Peter Davies, on the far right, said they would rise from the ashes after the vandalism, and members were "overwhelmed" by the £ 85,000 donated to date. He is pictured with colleagues (from left) Mick Quinn, Bill Sowerby and Colin Broom

Four teenagers were arrested on suspicion of burglary and criminal damage and have since been released on bail. Above: A destroyed model lies on the floor of the school hall

Four teenagers were arrested on suspicion of burglary and criminal damage and have since been released on bail. Above: A destroyed model lies on the floor of the school hall

The vandals smashed more than 500 or 600 (pictured) Paul Andrews exhibits with trains and train accessories such as cars, animals, people and telegraph poles

The vandals smashed more than 500 or 600 (pictured) Paul Andrews exhibits with trains and train accessories such as cars, animals, people and telegraph poles

Members of the Lincolnshire-based club were devastated after the destruction resulted in the cancellation of the model railroad event at the Stamford Welland Academy

Members of the Lincolnshire-based club were devastated after the destruction resulted in the cancellation of the model railroad event at the Stamford Welland Academy

The intricate models were faithful representations of their real counterparts and required immense time and skill to build

The intricate models were faithful representations of their real counterparts and required immense time and skill to build

Mr. Davies said of the damage: “This is really terrible. I only know that people are emotionally destroyed. I showed my own railroad to someone from the insurance company at home and was in tears of tears.

"I've seen the good and most of the worst people, but I've never seen anything like it. I don't know what made the youngsters do it. & # 39;

Mr. Davies said about the donations: “My first thoughts are that it is just absolutely overwhelming. We are totally overwhelmed by their generosity. It's just phenomenal.

"From the worst of evil and the worst of feelings … we have now gone from one end of the spectrum to the other."

Mr. Davies said the destroyed sets could "never be rebuilt because of the years of work that went into them."

He added: “We will try to help everyone who has helped us in any way with our exhibition. This is not just about the Market Deeping Model Railway Club, but everyone who is involved in any way.

& # 39; We are also examining how we can support everyone in the model railroad world. We are looking into how we can support other clubs that host exhibitions that have additional security requirements that they had not budgeted for. & # 39;

He added: “If people want to donate, it is really wonderful and we are very, very grateful. We rise from the ashes. & # 39;

Four teenagers were arrested on suspicion of burglary and criminal damage. The club had set up an exhibition in the school to visit on Sunday. Above: Exhibition manager Bill Sowerby clutched one of the damaged models

Four teenagers were arrested on suspicion of burglary and criminal damage. The club had set up an exhibition in the school to visit on Sunday. Above: Exhibition manager Bill Sowerby clutched one of the damaged models

Model railroad enthusiast Sir Rod Stewart, pictured with a huge set from his home in Beverley Hills, has donated £ 10,000 to the Market Deeping Model Railway Club after vandals destroyed their exhibits at their annual weekend exhibition

Model railroad enthusiast Sir Rod Stewart, pictured with a huge set from his home in Beverley Hills, has donated £ 10,000 to the Market Deeping Model Railway Club after vandals destroyed their exhibits at their annual weekend exhibition

Sir Rod, 74, has been a big fan of trains since childhood when he grew up in North London and watched them from his window. He is pictured at the Toronto Railway Historical Association

Sir Rod, 74, has been a big fan of trains since childhood when he grew up in North London and watched them from his window. He is pictured at the Toronto Railway Historical Association

Sir Rod, who made a film about his own 100-foot model train in his California home in Beverley Hills earlier this year, also urged his friends and enthusiasts Jools Holland and The Who & # 39; s Roger Daltrey to follow suit.

The 74-year-old musician said: “I was absolutely devastated to hear that vandals had destroyed a nice show by the Market Deeping Model Railway Club at the weekend.

“The collection was invaluable and I am donating £ 10,000 to compensate those affected, and I urge other enthusiasts Jools Holland, Roger Daltrey and others to do the same. It took me 23 years to build my model train so I could feel its pain. & # 39;

Sir Rod even built a scale model of New York's Grand Central Station in his US block and said in his movie he wanted people to treat it with respect, adding, "Don't say it's a" train set ". It's a model train. & # 39;

Music producer and DJ Pete Waterman, 72, who has been a model railroad enthusiast for 60 years, told MailOnline that many members of the club will be broken after "losing their life's work". He said: "I'm just speechless. It's a lifetime of work. I know a man who had a £ 5,500 engine there and he lost a total of five engines. The reason they are so valuable is that it takes so long to build. If you give someone £ 5,000 again now, they won't build him again

Music producer and DJ Pete Waterman, 72, who has been a model railroad enthusiast for 60 years, told MailOnline that many members of the club will be broken after "losing their life's work". He said: "I'm just speechless. It's a lifetime of work. I know a man who had a £ 5,500 engine there and he lost a total of five engines. The reason they are so valuable is that it takes so long to build. If you give someone £ 5,000 again now, they won't build him again

"We had to give up the whole thing because it was the scene of total devastation," said the club chairman. This picture shows the extent of the damage with tables and chairs turned over

Well-wishers have already raised over £ 60,000 to repair and replace the models, and stars like Sir Rod Stewart and DJ Pete Waterman have pledged their support

Well-wishers have already raised over £ 60,000 to repair and replace the models, and stars like Sir Rod Stewart and DJ Pete Waterman have pledged their support

Pictured is Paul Andrews from the P&D Marsh Model Railway Club, who had brought his own models to the exhibition just to see them destroyed. Club chairman Peter Davies said that after the vandalism, "adult men in tears"

Pictured is Paul Andrews from the P&D Marsh Model Railway Club, who had brought his own models to the exhibition just to see them destroyed. Club chairman Peter Davies said that after the vandalism, "adult men in tears"

He previously showed that his interest in the hobby dates back to when he lived with his parents in Highgate, north London, above a newspaper shop and watched trains from his window.

Music producer and DJ Pete Waterman, 72, who has been a model railroad enthusiast for 60 years, told MailOnline that many members of the club will be broken after "losing their life's work".

He said: "I'm just speechless. It's a lifetime of work. I know a man who had a £ 5,500 engine there and he lost a total of five engines. The reason they are so valuable is that it takes so long to build. If you give someone £ 5,000 again now, they won't build him again.

"If I had come in and seen that, I would be done. I would have got into my car and had & # 39; enough & # 39; said. This is a hobby that has taken me through some terrible times. The pleasure of building something and seeing how it works, as well as the social side of it. & # 39;

Mr. Andrews had model railroad sets as a child and started making them himself when his oldest child Louis, now 35, became interested in Thomas The Tank Engine. Above: Some models destroyed by Mr. Andrews

Mr. Andrews had model railroad sets as a child and started making them himself when his oldest child Louis, now 35, became interested in Thomas The Tank Engine. Above: Some models destroyed by Mr. Andrews

Mr. Andrews said the destruction was "pointless." & # 39; It's depressing. It's frustrating that someone destroyed a lot of my business, ”he added

Mr. Andrews said the destruction was "pointless." & # 39; It's depressing. It's frustrating that someone destroyed a lot of my business, ”he added

The models that Mr. Andrews constructed were carefully constructed over hundreds of hours, but were broken to pieces in just a few minutes

The models that Mr. Andrews constructed were carefully constructed over hundreds of hours, but were broken to pieces in just a few minutes

Above: the exceptional level of detail of the models, which now has to be replaced with a lot of time and money

Above: the exceptional level of detail of the models, which now has to be replaced with a lot of time and money

Mr. Waterman said he donated to the club's appeal, but declined to say how much. He added that he would invite her to play a prominent role in the Warley Model Railway exhibition at Birmingham's NEC Arena, which he is said to be president of in November.

He added: “I have no idea why four small children break into a school and do so. We had some ideas to form work groups, go there (to Market Deeping) and help them rebuild. But many of these guys have broken hearts. It's like a child has a favorite toy and you come and stomp on it.

& # 39; It's just not normal. I've been doing shows for 40 years and I can probably tell you how many times a show was pinched because it happened so rarely. & # 39;

Mr. Waterman has a "huge" million-pound collection that he has been working on for 18 years and is still unfinished.

He sold 10 percent of his collection for £ 600,000 in 2015 to secure the future of the Waterman Railway Heritage Trust.

The 85-year-old club president Colin Brown described Sir Rod's gesture as "amazing" and praised the model railroad as "brotherhood" because it was so closely linked.

MailOnline contacted representatives of Mr. Holland and Mr. Daltrey to check whether they correspond to Sir Rod's donation.

Regarding Sir Rod's donation, Mr. Brown, a former worker in the private rail industry, said: “It's amazing how people like Rod Stewart donated. This is a big help from him.

Torn to pieces: Mr. Andrews & # 39; models are in ruins at school after vandals broke in and destroyed them overnight

Torn to pieces: Mr. Andrews & # 39; models are in ruins at school after vandals broke in and destroyed them overnight

The trail of destruction leaves railway enthusiasts distraught. But the club was knocked out by a flood of donations on a Just Giving website that was set up to raise just £ 500 to get them back on their feet.

The trail of destruction leaves railway enthusiasts distraught. But the club was knocked out by a flood of donations on a Just Giving website that was set up to raise just £ 500 to get them back on their feet.

Bill Sowerby and Alan Hancock of the Market Deeping Model Railway Club in Sleaford, 2018, with one of their model railroad constructions. In the picture below, Bill and Alan are standing over a destroyed railroad that will take years of work

Bill Sowerby and Alan Hancock of the Market Deeping Model Railway Club in Sleaford, 2018, with one of their model railroad constructions. In the picture below, Bill and Alan are standing over a destroyed railroad that will take years of work

“It is the fraternity with model trains. We are rude to each other and take Mickey apart, but we sit together.

"It's that kind of crowd."

Mr. Brown from Cambridgeshire added: “The appeal is going well, we are quite surprised. I've never known anything like this.

“I've been involved in exhibitions since 1947-1948 and have never seen anything so devastated.

"The money collected is used to replace what has been lost and the remaining money is used to help other clubs."

“But we will not be able to replace exactly what has been lost. Much of the material was unique, like the handmade one.

& # 39; Some of the locomotives are no longer manufactured. The main thing we lost is time. A layout that was completely shattered lasted 25 years.

Market Deeping Model Railway Club's Peter Davis (left) and Bill Sowerby lost years of work on Saturday's raid at the Stamford Welland Academy in Stamford. 70-year-old Chairman Peter Davies said exhibits had been smashed, thrown around and stamped, including a locomotive worth around £ 8,500

Market Deeping Model Railway Club's Peter Davis (left) and Bill Sowerby lost years of work on Saturday's raid at the Stamford Welland Academy in Stamford. 70-year-old Chairman Peter Davies said exhibits had been smashed, thrown around and stamped, including a locomotive worth around £ 8,500

Above: Destroyed models of sidings and buildings lie on a table, the disturbed owners of which can hardly see

Above: Destroyed models of sidings and buildings lie on a table, the disturbed owners of which can hardly see

“If it were my layout, I would be 110 years old when it was rebuilt. It is the time factor that we have to deal with. The material costs are not the biggest. & # 39;

Paul Andrews, 58, owner of P&D Marsh model railroad supplier, who lives in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, estimates that the vandals have damaged more than £ 20,000 in model railroad equipment he sells as a company.

The vandals smashed more than 500 or 600 Mr. Andrews exhibits, including trains and train accessories such as cars, animals, people, and telegraph poles.

"I do trains and things like cars, animals, people and telegraph poles," he said.

& # 39; Approximately 90 percent of them are smashed without replacement.

“It could take two hours to replace everyone, so at least 1,000 hours of my time.

“If I estimate my time at £ 20 an hour, it's £ 20,000 of my time.

“I also have to buy the materials.

“If they just came in and stole a few pieces, you can handle it.

& # 39; But it's just pointless. It’s depressing. It's frustrating that someone destroyed a lot of my business, ”he added.

The wreck has now been cleared to allow the school to reopen as usual, and the club has moved everything that can be saved to a storage location. Above: A model of a building after it has been torn to pieces

The wreck has now been cleared to allow the school to reopen as usual, and the club has moved everything that can be saved to a storage location. Above: A model of a building after it has been torn to pieces

Club President Colin Brown (85) and Mr. Sowerby stand next to their destroyed models. The show was expected to draw between 500 and 600 people from across the country

Club President Colin Brown (85) and Mr. Sowerby stand next to their destroyed models. The show was expected to draw between 500 and 600 people from across the country

Some of the models and equipment had been thrown through the basketball hoops in the hall, and an electrical cable hung on one of the beams in the roof. Above: Mr. Brown is holding one of his damaged models

Some of the models and equipment had been thrown through the basketball hoops in the hall, and an electrical cable hung on one of the beams in the roof. Above: Mr. Brown is holding one of his damaged models

The act of "total wanton destruction" left "grown men in tears" and led to the cancellation of the event at the Stamford Welland Academy, which was described as "looking like a bomb site".

The wreck has now been cleared to allow the school to reopen as usual, and the club has moved everything that can be saved to a storage location.

Mr. Davies, a grandfather of five children and a retired teacher, said the preparation of the exhibition took hours and included exhibits that were the “life's work” of some members.

The show was expected to draw between 500 and 600 people from across the country and should start on Saturday.

At the weekend, Mr Davies of Market Deeping, Lincolnshire, who has been building model trains for 60 years, said: “We are devastated and upset.

& # 39; It's heartbreaking. There were grown men in tears over what had been done, and I admit that I was one of them.

»Can you imagine that your life's work has been destroyed? A man has spent 25 years with his work and it is broken, it is just terrible. They left it like a bomb site.

“We had to give up the whole thing because it was the scene of total devastation.

“We will never have the time to create such layouts again, so that's where the trouble comes from. Some of the models were irreplaceable.

Model railroad exhibits worth thousands of pounds were destroyed in an act of "total deliberate destruction".

Model railroad exhibits worth thousands of pounds were destroyed in an act of "total deliberate destruction".

“We will never have the time to create such layouts again, so that's where the trouble comes from. Some of the models were irreplaceable, ”said Davies

“We will never have the time to create such layouts again, so that's where the trouble comes from. Some of the models were irreplaceable, ”said Davies

“The work, which had taken many years, was completely destroyed. There were many different models of locomotives in the hall that were smashed, kicked and kicked around.

& # 39; Tables and layouts were overturned, dioramas were devastated, it was total devastation and destruction. There was no plan, it was pointless. I have no idea why anyone would do that.

“The damage will exceed tens of thousands of pounds, but it will never reward the time, skill, and love that went into making these models. You can't compensate for that.

“People have spent their lives building a model, and to see it destroyed, there is no human emotion to explain – just total despair.

"But we had support from all over the world – all the way to New Zealand, and we will sit back and relax."

Some of the models and equipment had been thrown through the basketball hoops in the hall, and an electrical cable hung on one of the beams in the roof.

Many exhibits showed dozens of tiny, handcrafted components and had taken hours to prepare.

The police were alarmed by a resident at 3.50 a.m. and a short time later an alarm was triggered in the school.

Lincolnshire police officers and a Cambridgeshire police dog handler were able to locate four teenagers who had been hiding at school.

A Lincolnshire police spokesman said: “When we arrived at the school, we arrested four teenagers who were on the premises for burglary and criminal damage.

"We continue our investigation and confirm that model railroad exhibits set up for an exhibition at the school have been damaged."

"Mindless idiots have destroyed my life's work": Paul Andrews, 58, says vandals have caused £ 20,000 worth of damage to the model railroad he sells as a company

Paul Andrews, 58, owner of P&D Marsh model railroad supplier, who lives in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, estimates that the vandals have damaged more than £ 20,000 in model railroad equipment he sells as a company

Paul Andrews, 58, owner of P&D Marsh model railroad supplier, who lives in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, estimates that the vandals have damaged more than £ 20,000 in model railroad equipment he sells as a company

Paul Andrews, 58, owner of P&D Marsh model railroad supplier, who lives in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, estimates that the vandals have damaged more than £ 20,000 in model railroad equipment he sells as a company.

The vandals smashed more than 500 or 600 Mr. Andrews exhibits, including trains and train accessories such as cars, animals, people, and telegraph poles.

Mr. Andrews had model railroad sets as a child and started making them himself when his oldest child Louis, now 35, became interested in Thomas The Tank Engine.

Around the same time, he took over P&D Marsh.

M Andrews, who has five grown children, said: “This weekend has shown me both sides of humanity.

"There were the thoughtless idiots who destroyed some people's life's work.

“But since then, a lot of people have rung the bell and wished me luck.

"You see the best and worst people.

„Ich habe Dinge verloren, die physisch ersetzt werden müssen.

„Mein Metallständer, mit dem ich Modelle verkaufe, wurde zerschlagen und hatte einen Wert von 300 oder 400 Pfund.

„Ich habe einen Kartenautomaten, der ersetzt werden muss und 250 Pfund kostet.

„Ich mache das seit ungefähr 25 Jahren und habe 500 bis 600 Displaymodelle aufgebaut, um Kunden zu zeigen, wie jeder einzelne Artikel aussieht, den sie kaufen können.

'Für jedes Modell gibt es ein Beispiel. Ich mache Züge und Dinge wie Autos, Tiere, Menschen und Telegrafenmasten.

'Ungefähr 90 Prozent davon werden ersatzlos zerschlagen.

„Es könnte zwei Stunden dauern, bis ich jeden ersetzt habe, also mindestens 1.000 Stunden meiner Zeit.

Herr Andrews sagte, dass ungefähr 90 Prozent der Modelle, die er für Kunden herstellt, wie Autos, Züge, Tiere, Menschen und Telegrafenmasten, "ersatzlos zerschlagen" werden.

Herr Andrews sagte, dass ungefähr 90 Prozent der Modelle, die er für Kunden herstellt, wie Autos, Züge, Tiere, Menschen und Telegrafenmasten, "ersatzlos zerschlagen" werden.

„Wenn ich meine Zeit auf 20 Pfund pro Stunde schätze, sind es 20.000 Pfund meiner Zeit.

„Ich muss auch die Materialien kaufen.

»Wenn sie gerade hereingekommen sind und ein paar Stücke gestohlen haben, können Sie damit umgehen.

'Aber es ist einfach sinnlos. Es ist deprimierend. Es ist frustrierend, dass jemand einen großen Teil meines Geschäfts zerstört hat “, fügte er hinzu.

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