ENTERTAINMENT

PM puts England in an even tougher lockdown than in March


The new lock in England at a glance

England is placed on a full national lockdown that will last until halfway through February.

All elementary and secondary schools will be closed with immediate effect

Lessons remain only for vulnerable students and children of key workers.

They are due to reopen after the half-time break in February.

It is unlikely that A-Level and GCSE exams will run as planned in the summer.

The universities will remain closed to students until mid-February.

Kindergartens remain fully open.

The public should stay home unless they have to leave for one of only five reasons: when they cannot work from home, shop for necessities, play sports, provide care, and for medical treatment or emergencies.

All non-essential retailers, hospitality and "personal care" like hairdressers must close.

Restaurants and other eateries can continue to operate for takeout and delivery.

However, pubs are no longer allowed to offer take-away alcohol sales.

Children's playgrounds remain open.

All indoor and outdoor sports facilities, including golf courses, gyms, swimming pools, and tennis courts, must be closed, and team sports cannot take place outdoors.

Elite sports such as the Premier League can be pursued according to their own standards.

Boris Johnson put England into a national lockdown in an even more brutal way than last March to keep the mutated coronavirus at bay while vaccines are rolled out.

Just a day after urging parents to send their children back, the Prime Minister stated in a somber address from No. 10 that elementary and secondary schools will be closed from tomorrow until at least halfway through February, with only those in need of protection and descendants of the principal workers allow it to enter.

University students are asked to stay home and study remotely while exams do not go ahead as planned. Kindergartens can remain open.

Non-essential retail stores, all hospitalities, gyms and swimming pools must be closed nationwide.

Cafes, bars and restaurants are allowed to serve take-away meals. However, due to the tightening of the draconian measures last spring, they are not allowed to serve alcohol. Endangered persons are asked to shield if possible. The common worship service can be continued with social distancing.

The public is only allowed to leave the house for one of five reasons: go to work if necessary, shop for necessities, play sports – be with someone from another household, take care of someone, or seek medical help.

The extraordinary third national pressure will come into effect as soon as regulations are enacted tomorrow, but Mr Johnson urged the public to adopt the new rules now. MEPs will vote on them on Wednesday, when parliament is recalled, despite no prospect of defeat. Aiders believe there is little chance they will be kept for at least seven weeks.

With his hands crossed and behind a desk on Downing Street, Mr Johnson said, “Our hospitals have been under more pressure than ever since the pandemic began. It is clear that we need to do more while our vaccines are being rolled out. & # 39;

He said it was "not possible or fair" for exams to go ahead as usual this summer.

"The weeks ahead are going to be the toughest, but I really believe we're reaching the end of the fight," he said, promising that by mid-February the top four categories on the vaccine distribution list had their first pushes.

However, he admitted that all he could do was give assurances that the situation will improve, provided our understanding of the virus does not change again.

Mr Johnson said he had no choice after faced terrible numbers by science leaders today.

Hospital patients with coronavirus had risen 40 percent over a week and are now taller than when the first wave peaked.

The extent of the problem was underscored when the last dismal daily record was released of 58,784 new cases – a 42 percent increase last Monday.

This means the UK passed the 50,000 daily infection milestone for a week, suggesting that the easing of restrictions this Christmas fueled the outbreak.

Health ministry chiefs recorded 407 more deaths, up just 14 percent from the previous week. However, it can take several weeks for infected patients to become seriously ill and succumb to the disease, meaning deaths have not yet peaked and will continue to increase. The UK recorded nearly 1,000 deaths twice in the past week, with the gruesome tolls slipping since the darkest days of spring.

Nicola Sturgeon announced drastic action in the Scottish Parliament this afternoon. A home stay has been made mandatory from midnight, and schools north of the border are due to be closed until February.

Even the Isles of Scilly haven't escaped and will switch from Tier 1 straight to full lockdown when restrictions go into effect.

No10 sources insist that the government wants to go back to a tiering system once the virus wears off and vaccinations make it possible.

Union leader Keir Starmer said the move was "imperative" and his MPs support it.

High-ranking Tory MPs had joined the opposition and called for another national ban. But the idea of ​​tightening restrictions is likely to spark the anger of other conservatives who insist that the country's experience with the pandemic shows lockdowns don't work and cripples the economy.

Another gloomy day of the coronavirus mayhem:

  • Matt Hancock said he was "incredibly concerned" about a new South African variant of the coronavirus that experts fear will not be caught in the current crop of vaccines.
  • Brian Pinker, an 82-year-old retired maintenance manager from Oxford, is the first to receive the AstraZeneca vaccine outside of studies.
  • The teaching unions launched a concerted offer to close all classrooms, despite Boris Johnson's request to stay open. Millions of parents have had to teach their children at home for at least a fortnight, often with only a few hours' lead time.
  • The latest data shows that the number of confirmed coronavirus patients in hospital in England rose 33 percent between Christmas and January 2nd.

Speaking on Downing Street, Mr Johnson said, “Our hop towns have been under more pressure than ever since the pandemic began. It is clear that we need to do more while our vaccines are being rolled out. & # 39;

Downing Street released a series of slides showing the country's problem due to the new variant of the virus

Downing Street released a series of slides showing the country's problem due to the new variant of the virus

The Joint Biosecurity Center today recommended lowering the alert level for Covid-19

The summer exams are interrupted because schools, colleges and universities are closed

Schools and colleges across England are slated to close tomorrow through mid-February due to Boris Johnson's new national coronavirus lockdown.

Primary and secondary schools have to switch to distance learning for the vast majority of students, with only vulnerable children and children of key workers being allowed to attend classes in person.

Meanwhile, university students will be banned from returning to campus and urged to study from home as the prime minister desperately tries to get the rate of Covid-19 infection back under control.

The restrictions and school closings are expected to continue through the February semester, which is slated to begin on February 15.

The massive disruption to learning means the government will rethink its current plan for students to complete GCSEs and high school diplomas as usual in May and June.

However, students and parents face an uncertain situation in the coming weeks as the Ministry of Education and Examination Inspectorate Ofqual have not yet worked out the details of the updated examination schedule.

Despite the school closings, facilities for early years such as kindergartens and special schools can remain open during the closure.

Mr Johnson announced the closure of the nation's schools during a speech to the nation from Downing Street that evening, saying the government had no choice but to take drastic action as ministers "are doing everything they can to stop the spread." to stop the disease ".

The Prime Minister said he "fully understand the inconvenience and hardship this late change will cause millions of parents" and that "we recognize that this means that it is not possible or fair for all exams to go as usual this summer be performed".

Mr Johnson said Education Secretary Gavin Williamson would announce "alternative arrangements" for student assessment in the coming weeks.

In his speech to the nation, the Prime Minister said the previous tiers would have been enough to tackle Covid as it was originally, but the new variant – which is 50 to 70 percent more transferable – spread in a frustrating and alarming manner.

"As I speak to you tonight, our hospitals are under more pressure from Covid than they have ever been since the pandemic began," he said.

Mr Johnson said the number of Covid patients in hospitals in England rose by almost a third to almost 27,000 in the past week – around 40 percent more than the first high in April.

On December 29th, "more than 80,000 people across the UK tested positive for Covid" the number of deaths has increased by 20 percent in the past week "and will unfortunately continue to rise".

"With most of the country, or perhaps under extreme measures, it is clear that we must do more together to get this new variant under control while our vaccines are rolled out," he said.

"So in England we have to go into a national lockdown that is tough enough to contain this variant."

Mr Johnson said parents could reasonably ask why decisions about schools weren't made "earlier".

"The answer is simply that we did everything in our power to keep schools open because we know how important each day in education is to children's life chances," he said.

“And I want to emphasize that the problem is not that schools are unsafe for children. It is still very unlikely that children will be severely affected by the new variant of Covid.

"The problem is that schools can still act as vectors, causing the virus to spread between households."

Mr Johnson said the move to school meant "it is not possible or fair for all exams to go through as usual this summer".

He said Education Secretary Gavin Williamson would work with the Ofqual regulator to "make alternative arrangements".

The Prime Minister added: "We will provide additional support to ensure that students who are eligible for free school meals continue to receive them while schools are closed and we will distribute more devices to support distance learning work."

The Prime Minister suggested that England could "steadily" exit the lockdown from mid-February – but he severely curtailed his optimism, a sign that the crisis could drag on for much longer.

"Unless our understanding of the virus changes dramatically again, if the rollout of the vaccination program continues to be successful, if deaths begin to decline as the vaccine takes effect, and – critically – if everyone plays their part by following the rules, then I hope we can steadily move out of the lockdown, reopen schools after the February halftime, and cautiously begin moving regions down, "said Johnson.

He rounded off his shabby address by repeating the mantra from the first lockdown: "Stay home, protect the NHS and save lives".

"I want to say to everyone across the UK that I know how difficult it is," he said.

“And I know how frustrated you are, and I know that you have led more than enough of the government to fight this virus.

"But now, more than ever, we have to pull together."

He warned that "the coming weeks will be the most difficult" but "with every push that goes into our arms we tilt the odds against Covid and in favor of the British people".

"Thanks to the miracle of science, not only is the end in sight, but we know exactly how to get there."

Mr Johnson confirmed this morning that despite the optimism sparked by the administration of the first Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine doses, "tougher" measures would come – although at the time he had apparently indicated that he would prefer to keep the animal Maintain system in England.

The data that left the PM with no option, apart from the lock Mk 3

On January 4th, there were 26,626 Covid patients in hospital in England.

That was an increase of over 30 percent on the same day a week earlier.

The peak of hospital patients in the first wave was 18,974 on April 12 – meaning the level is now 40 percent higher.

There were 80,664 positive tests in the UK on December 29 and an additional 65,571 on December 30.

The case rate in England as of December 30th was 518 per 100,000 population – three times as much as at the beginning of the month (151.3).

SAGE has warned that it is likely impossible to control the new coronavirus variant while it remains open – although experts say a full shutdown may still not be enough to keep the & # 39; R & # 39; reproduction rate below to bring one.

Michael Gove held a conference call with First Ministers from the four nations to coordinate strategies. In a sign of division, Wales has announced that it will push ahead with the reopening of schools in the next fourteen days, pending new evidence of variant lineage.

Previously, former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt joined Labor and Tory MPs' calls for immediate national pressure with closed schools and borders and a ban on any mixing of households.

Mr Hunt warned that the mutant Covid had put pressure on the NHS compared to normal winters and the government could not afford to wait another day.

Mr Hunt wrote on Twitter: “For those who argue, winter at the NHS is always like this: You're wrong. I faced four major winter crises as Health Sec, and the situation is now worse than any. & # 39;

Mr Hunt said the "main lesson" from the pandemic was that countries "can save lives and return their economies to normal faster" if they "act early and decisively".

"We can't afford to wait: all schools should be closed, international travel stopped, the household mix limited and the animal system checked so that the highest level really lowers the infection rate," said Hunt.

"The good news is that unlike before, these restrictions will be limited to around 12 weeks to get the vaccine to those most susceptible to Covid. So there is light at the end of the tunnel."

Part of a growing group of Conservative MPs, including former No. 10 Advisor Neil O'Brien, Mr Hunt urged immediate action to combat the rise in the coronavirus.

Labor has also pushed for pressure, and Sadiq Khan said Mr Hunt was "spot on".

Previously, Matt Hancock had suggested that the first step would be to escalate even more parts of the country into Tier 4. Tier 3 appeared unable to hold back the more contagious version of the deadly disease.

He insisted that part of the problem was caused by people who did not obey the rules and urged some MPs to give the police more powers.

However, there have been questions about how much more impact an expansion of Tier 4 coverage could have, as three-quarters of England are already under the hardest bracket where only essential stores like supermarkets are allowed to open and people are supposed to stay at home.

Dr. Yvonne Doyle, Medical Director for Public Health England (PHE), said the latest daily numbers are a "bitter warning" of the threat.

“The continued rise in cases and deaths should be a bitter warning to us all. We can't forget the basics – the lives of our friends and family depend on it, ”she said.

During a visit to Chase Farm Hospital in north London this morning, Mr Johnson warned of "tough, tough" weeks.

He added, "If you look at the numbers there is no question that we need to take stricter measures and we will announce these in due course."

Mr Johnson tried to get a positive rating and promised that vaccination numbers will go up massively.

Boris Johnson visited Chase Farm Hospital in North London today with the University of Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine

Boris Johnson visited Chase Farm Hospital in North London today with the University of Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine

The measures will replace the tiered system which already saw three-quarters of England's toughest tier 4, where only essential retail stores can be opened and people are supposed to stay at home

The measures will replace the tiered system which already saw three-quarters of England's toughest tier 4, where only essential retail stores can be opened and people are supposed to stay at home

Jeremy Hunt warned that the mutated Covid had put pressure on the NHS compared to normal winters and that the government couldn't afford to wait another day

Jeremy Hunt warned that the mutated Covid had put pressure on the NHS compared to normal winters and that the government couldn't afford to wait another day

He added, “A massive ramp-up operation is currently underway.

& # 39; The rate limiting factor now is not the delivery of vaccines, although we want it to be faster, but rather that they are properly tested and sent to the NHS.

“It's not the ability to distribute the vaccine, it's not the lack of staff.

& # 39; It is being tested properly. That will increase in the coming weeks. & # 39;

Asked in a round of interviews about the prospect of a national lockdown, Mr. Hancock said, “We are not ruling anything out and have shown repeatedly that we will look at and follow public health advice on how to what is needed to control the spread of the disease. "

When asked if changes could be announced in the next 24 hours, he replied, "We have shown that we are ready to move incredibly quickly … We look at the data every day."

Mr Hancock said the "old animal system was no longer strong enough" because the new variant was "much easier to catch, much more transferable and we are now seeing the effects in many different parts of the country". .

When asked on Sky News whether Tier 4 restrictions work, Hancock said, “Honestly, it's people's behavior. Of course, what matters are the rules we have put in place, but it's also about how people act.

"And to be honest, I would say this: It is important that everyone in the country do everything possible to reduce the spread of the virus."

In a stark message about the length of the struggle Britain is facing, Hancock said the problem is "how we as a society collectively keep this under control for the next few months … until the vaccines can keep us safe".

The government's Covid-O committee, which makes decisions on lockdown restrictions, is believed to have met today to decide next steps.

Ms. Sturgeon announced this afternoon that Scotland would be back into national coronavirus lockdown from midnight.

The SNP chairman said the new policy, which will last through January, will include a legally enforceable stay at home rule.

Scotland in national lockdown from midnight

Scotland will again be placed in a national coronavirus lockdown from midnight tonight, Nicola Sturgeon announced this afternoon.

The SNP chairman said the new policy, which will last through January, will include a legally enforceable stay at home rule.

Exercise and important travel are the only reasons people are allowed to leave their homes.

The scheduled reopening of schools on January 18 will also be postponed to February 1 at the earliest, while workers are instructed to work from home wherever possible.

The rules for outdoor gatherings are tightened so that a maximum of two people from two households can meet.

In the meantime, the places of worship are closed starting this Friday, but weddings and funerals are still allowed to take place.

A maximum of 20 people can attend funeral services and a maximum of five people can attend weddings.

Ms. Sturgeon said the hard new curbs were necessary because of the “soaring” infection rate north of the border, as she warned the lockdown could be extended beyond January if necessary.

The measures effectively mean a return to the restrictions seen during the UK's first lockdown in late March last year.

All of mainland Scotland is already in the top tier of the Covid-19 rules, but the number of cases has led Ms. Sturgeon to take more drastic measures after 2,464 new cases were announced yesterday.

Exercise and important travel are the only reasons people are allowed to leave their homes.

The scheduled reopening of schools on January 18 will also be postponed to February 1 at the earliest, while workers are instructed to work from home wherever possible.

The rules for outdoor gatherings are tightened so that a maximum of two people from two households can meet.

In the meantime, the places of worship are closed starting this Friday, but weddings and funerals are still allowed to take place.

A maximum of 20 people can attend funeral services and a maximum of five people can attend weddings.

Ms. Sturgeon said the hard new curbs were necessary because of the “soaring” infection rate north of the border, as she warned the lockdown could be extended beyond January if necessary.

The measures effectively mean a return to the restrictions seen during the UK's first lockdown in late March last year.

All of mainland Scotland is already in the top tier of the Covid-19 rules, but the number of cases has led Ms. Sturgeon to take more drastic measures after 2,464 new cases were announced yesterday.

Mr Johnson said yesterday that he is also considering further school closings.

But Mr Hancock said this morning people should keep sticking to the rules – which means most primaries should be back this week.

He told Times Radio that people understood why the government was changing its position.

He said: “One of the big challenges in the middle of a pandemic is that the data is changing and therefore the health advice is rightly changing and we have to change our position.

“One of the interesting things I've noticed as Minister of Health last year is that people understand, right?

“People understand that the virus is moving – we've seen this new twist make things much, much harder because it's so much easier to spread, and then we need to update our position based on updated public health recommendations .

"In schools, we should follow this public health advice."

Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned the British that despite the optimism sparked by the administration of the first Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine doses, months of tighter restrictions would be needed

Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned the British that despite the optimism sparked by the administration of the first Oxford / AstraZeneca vaccine doses, months of tighter restrictions would be needed

The 82-year-old dialysis patient is the first Briton to have an Oxford stitch outside of the studies

Britain today began handing out Oxford's groundbreaking Covid vaccine at what has been called a "crucial moment" in the fight against the pandemic. An 82-year-old dialysis patient was the first to receive the sting.

Brian Pinker, a retired maintenance manager who describes himself as being born and raised in Oxford, said he was "so pleased" to receive the vaccine and "really proud" that it was developed in his city.

Mr Pinker, who is now looking forward to his 48th wedding anniversary with Ms. Shirley next month, received the coronavirus vaccine at 7:30 a.m. at Churchill Hospital in Oxford.

In the largest vaccination drive in British history, half a million doses of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca Jab will be made available this week to people in need of protection. "Tens of millions" are promised by April.

AstraZeneca bosses had previously suggested finishing up to 2 million cans a week by mid-January, and officials have promised to deliver the puffs as soon as possible.

That ambitious target may be further away than hoped, however, with fears the UK won't get enough supplies until February. Matt Hancock announced today that increasing the country's manufacturing capacity is "a major medium-term project".

And he said the "bureaucracy" associated with signing up as a voluntary vaccine will be cut after it was revealed last week that thousands of retired medics trying to hand out the bumps were tied to red tape.

In a joint statement, however, the education unions said workers are at "serious risk of infection".

The declaration signed by GMB, NAHT, NASUWT, NEU, Unison and Unite states: “The government’s chaotic handling of the opening of schools has created confusion among teachers, school staff and parents alike.

“If all students are brought back to the classroom when the infection rate is so high, those in the education sector are at serious health risk and could trigger the pandemic.

“Unions have called for a break in reopening schools to other than vulnerable children and children of key workers and a transition to distance learning for all while Covid-backed work regulations are reviewed. All school staff who continue to work in schools should be given priority access to Covid-19 vaccinations.

"Rather than casually claiming schools are safe, the Prime Minister should sit down with trade unions to discuss a common approach to ensuring safe working practices in all schools and prioritizing so that all students have the equipment and access they need need to maintain a high standard. " Distance learning until the safety of you and the staff at your school is ensured. & # 39;

SAGE member John Edmunds said tonight that Britain was on track to record more than 100,000 deaths.

The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine scientist told BBC Radio 4's PM program: “We are in a really difficult situation.

& # 39; The new strain is significantly more transferable than the old strains. So we need to take significant additional measures to prevent Covid patients from overwhelming the NHS.

“Unfortunately we have to take some really important additional measures, I don't see any other way out.

“The biggest lever that has only been partially pulled is the closure of schools. That would have the greatest effect of any single action, and I can see that happening. & # 39;

He later added, "What we have to do now, and it's horrible, I know, but we have to take really pretty strict steps now and be as strict as possible."

Prof. Edmunds turned down proposals that public failure to comply with restrictions was a big problem, saying, "I think that's not a big problem in itself, I think people are pretty compliant."

Earlier, when pressure on the prime minister rose, the Labor chief of Birmingham City Council joined calls for a new "lockdown" amid rising case rates.

Speaking to BBC Radio WM, Cllr Ian Ward said the city's 7-day case rate had risen 36 percent over the past week.

He added: “The NHS here in town is under a lot of pressure. Birmingham University Hospital occupied 98 percent of its critical care beds and Sandwell and City (Hospital Trust) occupied 100 percent of its critical care beds.

"We need decisive action now, and the government must act early and be one step ahead of the curve."

More optimistically, the UK started handing out Oxford's groundbreaking Covid vaccine today at a so-called "crucial moment" in the fight against the pandemic. An 82-year-old dialysis patient was the first to receive the push.

Brian Pinker, a retired maintenance manager who describes himself as being born and raised in Oxford, said he was "so pleased" to receive the vaccine and "really proud" that it was developed in his city.

Mr Pinker, who is now looking forward to his 48th wedding anniversary with Ms. Shirley next month, received the coronavirus vaccine at 7:30 a.m. at Churchill Hospital in Oxford.

In the largest vaccination drive in British history, half a million doses of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca Jab will be made available this week to people in need of protection. "Tens of millions" are promised by April.

AstraZeneca bosses had previously suggested finishing up to 2 million cans a week by mid-January, and officials have promised to deliver the puffs as soon as possible.

That ambitious target may be further away than hoped, however, with fears the UK won't get enough supplies until February. Matt Hancock announced today that increasing the country's manufacturing capacity is "a major medium-term project".

And he said the "bureaucracy" associated with signing up as a voluntary vaccine will be cut after it was revealed last week that thousands of retired medics trying to hand out the bumps were tied to red tape.

Mr. Hancock insisted that the manufacturing process will be the determining factor in how quickly vaccines can be deployed, not the NHS operation.

Covid Alert goes to the top level above fears NHS will not address

The Covil warning is being refreshed on fears that the NHS will not be able to handle rising cases.

The four British chief physicians recommended a change from level four to five on the recommendation of the Joint Biosecurity Center.

In a statement they said: “Many parts of the health systems in the four nations are already under immense pressure.

& # 39; There are currently very high transmission rates in the community, with significant numbers of COVID patients in hospitals and intensive care units.

“In large parts of the country there are almost everywhere cases that are driven by the new, more transferable variant.

& # 39; We are not confident that the NHS can handle another sustained surge in cases and, without further action, there is a substantial risk of the NHS becoming overwhelmed in several areas over the next 21 days.

However, they urged people in urgent need of attention to come forward and stressed that it was still possible to receive "life-saving treatment".

“It is absolutely essential that people still register for emergency care. If you don't need urgent medical attention, please contact your GP or call NHS111, ”the statement said.

He told BBC Breakfast: “If the NHS has to go faster, it will go faster. If two million doses were dispensed a week, the NHS would be dispensing at that rate.

"That is the crucial question, but this offer does not yet exist and we are working very closely with the manufacturers."

Last night, Sir Keir Starmer called for an immediate nationwide lockdown when he warned the virus was clearly out of control. The Labor leader added: "Don't let the Prime Minister say," I will, but not yet. "

“That's the problem he's had so many times. Nationwide lockdown – The prime minister has hinted this will happen but is again delaying. and we cannot afford that again. & # 39;

While appearing on the Andrew Marr Show on BBC One yesterday, Mr Johnson said he was "completely reconciled to doing what it takes to fight the virus" and warned of a "difficult time".

He said vaccinating more people would provide a way out of restrictions and he hoped that "tens of millions" would be vaccinated over the next three months.

The Prime Minister maintained his prediction that the situation would improve by spring, but added: “We may have to do things over the next few weeks that will be more difficult in many parts of the country.

"I totally agree – and I bet the people of this country are okay with it, because until the vaccine gets really massively up and running, we're going to fight this virus with the same tools."

Mr Johnson said the government is looking to see if Tier 4 restrictions are tight enough to control the spread of the virus or if more steps are needed, adding, "We need to keep things under review."

When asked whether people could be restricted to an hour of exercise a day or a total ban on household mixing could be introduced, he replied, “There are obviously a number of tougher measures we would need to consider. I'm not going to speculate now about what they would be.

This map shows how the coronavirus variants have been tracked on their worldwide distribution

This map shows how the coronavirus variants have been tracked on their worldwide distribution

Social distancing signs displayed at Coldfall Primary School in Muswell Hill, London, on Jan. 2 as Covid cases across the capital put increasing pressure on the NHS

Social distancing signs displayed at Coldfall Primary School in Muswell Hill, London, on Jan. 2 as Covid cases across the capital put increasing pressure on the NHS

“School closings – which we had to do in March – are clearly one of those things. We don't necessarily want to do that. & # 39;

Government sources confirmed that ministers wanted to add more areas of England to Stage Four – although curfews are not currently seen as imminent.

But Tory's former minister, Sir Desmond Swayne, was one of those who condemned the idea of ​​tightening the curbs. “What pain do you want to cause us? What are they going to stop us now? & # 39; he told the telegraph.

»Close important shops and takeaways? The whole thing is insane – it goes beyond the ridiculous. & # 39;

What do the new blocking rules mean for you? Schools and universities are closed, the vulnerable are called for protection, exams next summer canceled or threatened, and pubs are not allowed to sell alcohol to take away

Boris Johnson slammed England into a new lockdown tonight as he put in place emergency measures to control the spread of new strains of coronavirus, fearing the NHS could be overwhelmed.

Schools, shops and sports venues will close their doors for six weeks starting Wednesday morning, in scenes not seen since the original lockdown in March last year. Exercise is pretty much the only reason to get out of the house regularly.

The Prime Minister's address at 10 Downing Street came after Nicola Sturgeon slipped Scotland into a new lock from midnight tonight.

Wales has been under lockdown since before Christmas and the Northern Irish executive will announce its own measures when it meets tomorrow.

The latest figures showed an additional 407 people died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 on Monday, and there was a record of 58,784 laboratory-confirmed cases of coronavirus in the UK.

What are the new rules for the UK hit by Covid?

Schools, shops and sports venues will close their doors for six weeks in scenes not seen since the original lockdown last March. Only shopping with exercise and the bare minimum is allowed

Schools, shops and sports venues will close their doors for six weeks in scenes not seen since the original lockdown last March. Only shopping with exercise and the bare minimum is allowed

The Prime Minister's address at 10 Downing Street came after Nicola Sturgeon slipped Scotland into a new lock from midnight tonight

The Prime Minister's address at 10 Downing Street came after Nicola Sturgeon slipped Scotland into a new lock from midnight tonight

England

England is placed on a full national lockdown that will last until halfway through February.

All primary and secondary schools will be closed with immediate effect and will only remain open to vulnerable pupils and children of key workers. They are due to reopen after the half-time break in February.

It is unlikely that A-Level and GCSE exams will run as planned in the summer. Mr. Johnson says, "We recognize that this means that it is not possible or fair for all exams to be taken as normal this summer."

The universities will remain closed to students until mid-February.

Kindergartens remain fully open.

The public should stay home unless they have to go for one of only five reasons:

  • Working when this is not possible from home, e.g. B. Construction works and major public functions.
  • Shopping for necessities such as food and medicine.
  • Exercise, ideally no more than once a day. You can train with anyone in your support bladder or someone who is socially distant.
  • Take care of someone else.
  • For urgent or pre-arranged medical care or escape from an emergency.

All non-essential retailers, hospitality and “personal care” such as hairdressers will have to close if they have not already done so under the tier system.

Restaurants and other eateries can continue to operate for takeout and delivery.

However, pubs are no longer allowed to offer take-away alcohol as many people gather outside to drink.

According to real estate consultant Altus Group, more than 550,000 companies are going to close in England.

The company said this includes 401,690 non-essential stores, 64,537 pubs or restaurants, 20,703 personal care facilities and 7,051 gyms or leisure centers.

It added that 21,119 municipal schools as well as 2,645 private schools in England will also have to close.

Children's playgrounds remain open.

All indoor and outdoor sports facilities, including golf courses and tennis courts, must be closed, and team sports cannot take place outdoors.

Elite sports such as the Premier League can be pursued according to their own standards.

Exercise is one of the few reasons people regularly leave their homes across the UK along with shopping for essentials.

Exercise is one of the few reasons people regularly leave their homes across the UK along with shopping for essentials.

Physical education for children who are still in school is allowed.

Extremely Critical At Risk (ECV) people should stay at home even if they cannot work.

You can go for necessities like food and medicine, but avoid busy areas.

Scotland

According to Nicola Sturgeon, Scotland will again be put into national coronavirus lockdown from midnight tonight.

The SNP chairman said the new policy, which will last through January, will include a legally enforceable stay at home rule.

Exercise and important travel are the only reasons people are allowed to leave their homes.

The scheduled reopening of schools on January 18 will also be postponed to February 1 at the earliest, while workers are instructed to work from home wherever possible.

The rules for outdoor gatherings are tightened so that a maximum of two people from two households can meet.

Pubs in ganz Großbritannien bleiben geschlossen, und in England dürfen diejenigen, die Getränke zum Mitnehmen verkaufen durften, aus Angst vor Menschen, die sich draußen versammeln, nicht

Pubs in ganz Großbritannien bleiben geschlossen, und in England dürfen diejenigen, die Getränke zum Mitnehmen verkaufen durften, aus Angst vor Menschen, die sich draußen versammeln, nicht

In der Zwischenzeit sind die Kultstätten ab diesem Freitag geschlossen, aber Hochzeiten und Beerdigungen dürfen weiterhin stattfinden.

Maximal 20 Personen dürfen an Trauergottesdiensten teilnehmen, und maximal fünf Personen dürfen an Hochzeiten teilnehmen.

Frau Sturgeon sagte, die harten neuen Bordsteine ​​seien wegen der „stark steigenden“ Infektionsrate nördlich der Grenze notwendig, da sie warnte, dass die Sperrung bei Bedarf über den Januar hinaus verlängert werden könne.

Die Maßnahmen bedeuten effektiv eine Rückkehr zu den Beschränkungen, die während der ersten Sperre im Vereinigten Königreich, die Ende März letzten Jahres verhängt wurde, festgestellt wurden.

Das gesamte schottische Festland ist bereits in die höchste Stufe der Covid-19-Regeln eingestuft, aber die Fallzahlen haben Frau Sturgeon dazu veranlasst, drastischere Maßnahmen zu ergreifen, nachdem gestern 2.464 neue Fälle angekündigt wurden.

Die Schulen in England werden sofort geschlossen und schließen sich denen in Wales und Schottland an. Die beiden letztgenannten Nationen haben die Prüfungen dieses Sommers bereits abgesagt, und dies kann auch in England geschehen, wobei die Pläne noch bestätigt werden müssen.

Die Schulen in England werden sofort geschlossen und schließen sich denen in Wales und Schottland an. Die beiden letztgenannten Nationen haben die Prüfungen dieses Sommers bereits abgesagt, und dies kann auch in England geschehen, wobei die Pläne noch bestätigt werden müssen.

Der Erste Minister erläuterte die Maßnahmen, die ab Dienstag in Kraft treten sollen, und erklärte gegenüber den MSP in Holyrood: "Es ist keine Übertreibung zu sagen, dass ich über die Situation, mit der wir jetzt konfrontiert sind, mehr besorgt bin als seit März letzten Jahres."

Es wurde verstanden, dass der hochrangige Kabinettsminister Michael Gove in einem Aufruf vor der Erklärung von Herrn Johnson mit den Führern von Schottland, Wales und Nordirland über Beschränkungen diskutierte.

Die neuesten Daten zeigen, dass die Zahl der bestätigten Coronavirus-Patienten im Krankenhaus in England zwischen Weihnachten und dem 3. Januar um 41 Prozent gestiegen ist. Diese Zahlen haben in Whitehall und im Gesundheitswesen Alarm ausgelöst.

Die Prüfungen für Scottish Highers und Advanced Highers 2021 waren bereits abgesagt worden.

Wales

Wales ist seit dem 20. Dezember vollständig gesperrt.

Aufgrund der Einschränkungen müssen nicht unbedingt erforderliche Geschäfte, Fitnessstudios und Gaststätten geschlossen bleiben.

Nach drei Wochen werden die Regeln überprüft.

Die aktuellen Regeln bedeuten, dass nicht wesentliche Einzelhändler, Hospitality-Services und enge Kontaktdienste wie Friseure schließen müssen.

Es sind nur wesentliche Reisen gestattet, und die Arbeit von zu Hause aus muss „wo immer möglich“ erfolgen.

Zwei Haushalte können eine Stützblase bilden, die sich nur am Weihnachtstag in privaten Gärten oder in Innenräumen treffen darf.

Hauspartys, Versammlungen und Veranstaltungen sind verboten, und Schulen sollten Online-Lernen nutzen.

Ein Einpersonenhaushalt darf sich während der Beschränkungen der Stufe vier mit einem anderen Haushalt zusammenschließen.

Schulen und Hochschulen in ganz Wales werden bis zum 18. Januar auf Online-Lernen umsteigen, sagte der Bildungsminister des Landes heute.

Kirsty Williams sagte, die walisische Regierung werde die nächsten zwei Wochen nutzen, um mit den lokalen Behörden und Bildungseinrichtungen zusammenzuarbeiten, um "den besten Plan für den Rest der Amtszeit" zu erstellen.

Die Regierung hatte zuvor dafür gesorgt, dass die Schulen in den ersten zwei Wochen des Frühjahrssemesters flexibel sind, sodass sie entscheiden können, wann die Schüler wieder persönlich lernen möchten.

Die Universitäten in Wales sollen einen gestaffelten Semesterbeginn beginnen, und die Studenten sollten nicht zum persönlichen Lernen zurückkehren, es sei denn, sie werden darüber informiert, fügte sie hinzu.

Prüfungen in Wales, die im Sommer stattfinden sollen, waren bereits abgesagt worden.

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