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People living in the poorest parts of England die TWICE from coronavirus than from rich people


The most deprived areas of England have twice as high a coronavirus mortality rate as the richest areas, according to strict official data.

People living in the poorest areas of the country, which are typically inner-city districts in London, Birmingham and northern England, have suffered an average of nearly 140 Covid-19 deaths per 100,000 people.

The richest areas have now had half as many deaths, with an average rate of 63.4 deaths per 100,000.

A report from the National Statistics Office has given weight to data that has been showing for months that the most vulnerable people have been killed by the virus.

The reasons for this are not entirely clear, but scientists suggest that poorer overall health, living in crowded households, and dependence on public transport – which increases the risk of infection – increase people's risk of death.

Middlesbrough has had the highest Covid-19 mortality rate per capita outside of London, with 178 victims per 100,000 people.

The city of North Yorkshire was ranked the most deprived area in the country in a report released last year by the Department of Housing.

The most disadvantaged areas of England have twice as high a coronavirus mortality rate as the richest areas, according to strict official data

The picture was similar in Wales, where the least-favored areas died of Covid-19 almost twice as much as the wealthiest neighborhoods

The picture was similar in Wales, where the least-favored areas died of Covid-19 almost twice as much as the wealthiest neighborhoods

The ONS report categorized areas based on the English Index of Multiple Deprivation, which measures how well people living in a particular area are doing.

It takes into account how much money people earn, their employment status, their health, education, housing and how much crime there is in their region.

Individual areas are not classified into categories one to six, but the mortality rates are calculated for each category.

Why are people from poor areas more likely to die from COVID?

The reasons for this are not entirely clear, but scientists suggest that poorer overall health, living in crowded households, and dependence on public transport – which increases the risk of infection – increase people's risk of death.

Experts have suggested in the past that people in disadvantaged areas may be surrounded by more deaths, also because they are more likely to contract the virus.

They tend to work in people-related jobs such as retail or customer service and are more dependent on public transport, which means that they come into contact with more strangers.

And because they're more prone to health problems like obesity, diabetes, and heart problems, taking Covid seems to cause more life-threatening complications.

Richard Harris, professor of quantitative social geography at the University of Bristol, said: The data in itself does not say why deprivation increases risk, but it is not difficult to imagine why – in some cases major pre-existing health problems, but also the relationship between deprivation, ethnicity and job types (jobs with higher risk of exposure) and overcrowding of households. "

Category 1 areas that are most disadvantaged have had 139.6 coronavirus deaths per 100,000 people since the epidemic began on March 1 and June 30.

In category 10 areas – the richest households – the mortality rate was 63.4 per 100,000.

In the middle class, mortality rates varied between 25 and 50 deaths per 100,000 people.

Experts have suggested in the past that people in disadvantaged areas may be surrounded by more deaths, also because they are more likely to contract the virus.

They tend to work in people-related jobs such as retail or customer service and are more dependent on public transport, which means that they come into contact with more strangers.

In response to the data, Richard Harris, professor of quantitative social geography at the University of Bristol said: “The results in June differ from the earlier ones in that London was first hit by Covid-19 and originally had the highest regional mortality rate. Since then, the disease has spread and regions like the Northwest have taken the lead.

“Notable trends are that disadvantaged and ethnically diverse areas continue to be at higher risk, as are places with greater overcrowding and nursing homes.

“The data does not in itself say why disadvantage increases the risk, but it is not difficult to imagine why – in some cases, major pre-existing health problems, but also the relationship between disadvantage, ethnicity and job types (jobs with higher exposure risk) and household overcrowding.

“London has a young population on average, but part of it is due to its ethnic diversity, with many of these ethnic groups at higher risk.

"That and the fact that it is a cosmopolitan city with a large population that is densely populated and exposed to the virus at an early age will increase the age-standardized mortality rates."

The data showed a similar picture in Wales, where the rate in the poorest areas was 119.1 deaths per 100,000, almost twice that of the richest (63.5).

A separate report added weight to a trend during the outbreak, showing that mortality rates are significantly higher in poorer areas than in affluent postcodes. The poorest had an average of 139 deaths per 100,000 people, compared to 63 per 100,000 in the richest areas.

The most deprived areas in England had a mortality rate of 139 Covid deaths per 100,000 people, more than twice that in the least deprived areas (63.4). The picture was similar in Wales, where the rate in the poorest areas was 119.1 deaths per 100,000, almost double that of the richest (63.5).

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