TOP TRENDING

Patients from London could be brought to YORKSHIRE for treatment


Medical professionals in areas worst hit by the rising number of coronavirus cases will only have a few days to make "terrible decisions" about who to treat and who to die, a counselor warned last night.

The situation in hospitals, which have reached the breaking point with record admissions of Covid, continued to worsen yesterday. Ambulances were lining up and many intensive care units were overburdened.

It turns out that certain intensive care units in London have asked major hospitals in Yorkshire, more than 150 miles north, if they would agree to accept some patients.

The consulting anesthetist Dr. Claudia Paoloni warned that the situation was only a few days away from the point where care would be rationed.

Dr. Paoloni, president of the Hospital Consultants and Specialists Association, told The Guardian, “Our NHS just doesn't have the beds to handle it. Some areas will be overwhelmed in a few days. When ventilation capacity is exceeded, terrible decisions must be made about those who live and die. & # 39;

She added that other life-defining decisions also need to be made, including which patients to admit to the intensive care unit and how long to continue treatment for patients who appear to be making no progress, such as when a patient with better chance of survival is the Hemodialysis machine that they use.

Large numbers of ambulances are waiting outside London's Royal Hospital as the number of coronavirus cases soars due to the new variant, which is significantly more communicable than previous strains in London on December 29th

Leaked figures showed that England's critical care capacity is currently over 100 percent full in a number of hospitals in London, the Southeast and the East, reports the Health Service Journal.

It is unknown when patients will be transferred from the capital or whether Yorkshire hospitals will approve admission. NHS ICU patients are rarely that far away.

A high-level intensive care unit confirmed to HSJ that a number of requests for referral of patients to hospitals in Tier 3 Yorkshire have been made due to a lack of capacity in the Tier 4 capital.

Data from the NHS internal critical care capacity dashboard leaked to HSJ showed that London had far exceeded its maximum capacity with intensive care units 114 percent full Monday night.

The southeast was not far behind with intensive care units with a capacity of 113 percent. In the east of England, the leaked capacity data shows units running at 100 percent.

In each of the regions mentioned, over 60 percent of patients who filled intensive care units suffered from Covid-19.

With over 100 percent capacity growth, the intensive care units will struggle to cope with the reallocation of staff from other hospital services.

Another image from the NHS critical care dashboard passed to HSJ revealed that the number of Covid-19 patients in intensive care units in London has doubled from 300 to 636 in the past two weeks.

Data from the NHS internal critical care capacity dashboard leaked to HSJ showed that London had far exceeded its maximum capacity with intensive care units 114 percent full Monday night

Data from the NHS internal critical care capacity dashboard leaked to HSJ showed that London had far exceeded its maximum capacity with intensive care units 114 percent full Monday night

Another image from the NHS critical care dashboard passed to HSJ revealed that the number of Covid-19 patients in intensive care units in London has doubled from 300 to 636 in the past two weeks

Another image from the NHS critical care dashboard passed to HSJ revealed that the number of Covid-19 patients in intensive care units in London has doubled from 300 to 636 in the past two weeks

The Royal Free Hospital in North West London is fighting for space to treat adult patients, both Covid and non-Covid. It will move its children's inpatient facilities to another hospital.

The same applies to the acute admission department at Barnet General Hospital in north London, which is operated by the same trust and is being repurposed for treatment with Covid, reports The Guardian.

Christina Pagel, Professor of Operations Research at University College London, said: “Things are worse than ever.

“Action is needed now to prevent the NHS from collapsing in just a few weeks. It's so serious "

Dr. Samantha Batt-Rawden, a senior ICU registrar in the Southeast and President of the Doctor's Association UK, warned: “Hospitals are running out of oxygen. A trust no longer has non-invasive machines. Intensive care units tweet about susceptible patients for volunteers. Transfer teams are asked to transfer patients 65 miles or more to the nearest hospital with critical care capacity. You're welcome. Stay home if you can. & # 39;

She added: “We are incredibly thin on the ground. NHS staff have not been prioritized for the vaccine and are falling ill in droves with the new strain.

“Trusts are so desperate they tweeted medical students to help out in intensive care. This was confirmed by an on-site consultant. & # 39;

The news comes as NHS trusts operating in virus hotspots are reportedly considering building tents to be used to treat victims of terrorist attacks, outside hospitals overcrowded with coronavirus patients.

Official data shows that a quarter of UK hospitals are currently treating a dangerous amount of Covid patients.

A photo of the London Royal Hospital tonight showing a line of ambulances parked outside

A user shared a photo with the caption: 'Never seen RLH this crazy. Every corner of the Stepney Way entrance is full of it. & # 39;

Photos of London's Royal Hospital posted on social media tonight showing a line of ambulances parked outside. A user shared a photo with the caption: 'Never seen RLH this crazy. Every corner of the Stepney Way entrance is full of it. & # 39;

The lines in front of the Royal London Hospital come a day after data showed that the intensive care units in London were 114 percent full on Monday evening

The lines in front of the Royal London Hospital come a day after data showed that the intensive care units in London were 114 percent full on Monday evening

Ambulances line the streets outside the Royal London Hospital in London tonight as NHS England figures show England's hospitals now have more Covid-19 patients than during the first wave peak in April

Ambulances line the streets outside the Royal London Hospital in London tonight as NHS England figures show England's hospitals now have more Covid-19 patients than during the first wave peak in April

In London, over 60 percent of patients who filled intensive care units suffered from Covid-19. Ambulance at the Royal London Hospital

In London, over 60 percent of patients who filled intensive care units suffered from Covid-19. Ambulance at the Royal London Hospital

Ambulance outside the Queen & # 39; s Hospital in Romford, London, tonight, which has moved into the highest level of coronavirus restrictions due to rising case rates

Ambulance outside the Queen & # 39; s Hospital in Romford, London, tonight, which has moved into the highest level of coronavirus restrictions due to rising case rates

Emergency medic Simon Walsh, who works in northeast London, said some hospitals in Tier 4 regions are looking at ambulance queues outside of A&Es, with a new highly infectious strain of Covid believed to be behind one The surge in hospital admissions that has led England's hospitals to be busier now than they were at the height of the first wave.

He said some trusts are now considering building triage tents, usually used to cope with a "sudden surge in patients due to a major incident" such as a terrorist attack or industrial disaster, and to treat patients in the parking lot to prevent that the stations are completely overcrowded.

At the Royal London Hospital, ambulances lined up outside the hospital with patients waiting to be treated.

His surprising comments come after MailOnline's analysis of NHS England's numbers revealed that for the week ending December 22nd, at least a fifth of general beds in 37 trusts were occupied by coronavirus patients. Top experts have warned of a danger zone where Covid levels exceed 20 percent of total hospital occupancy, with the added pressure of the disease inevitably forcing health chiefs to cancel non-Covid services.

Tents to treat victims of terrorist attacks (like this one) could be erected outside hospitals crowded with coronavirus patients, it was claimed today

Tents to treat victims of terrorist attacks (like this one) could be erected outside hospitals crowded with coronavirus patients, it was claimed today

Doctors who work on the front lines in London say they operate in a "major event mode". According to reports, patients are being treated at hotspots in ambulances because of insufficient space in the hospital. A line of ambulances is parked at the A&E entrance of Queen & # 39; s Hospital in Romford today

Doctors who work on the front lines in London say they operate in a "major event mode". According to reports, patients are being treated at hotspots in ambulances because of insufficient space in the hospital. A line of ambulances is parked at the A&E entrance of Queen & # 39; s Hospital in Romford today

Two trusts were twice as high as this threshold in the past week. The coronavirus took over 45 percent of the beds at the Medway NHS Foundation Trust in Kent and four out of ten beds at the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust.

Dr. Walsh, who is also vice chairman of the British Medical Association's Advisory Committee, said staff are preparing for a "worsening of admissions" over the next few weeks as the virus continues to spread. The UK today saw 53,135 more coronavirus cases at a record daily high and 414 deaths as the second wave of the disease continues to rise.

An NHS spokesman said: "The NHS has been testing plans to deal with the significant pressures from either high COVID-19 infection rates or non-Covid winter requirements, and this has always included mutual aid practices where hospitals work together to accommodate manage.

Dr. Samantha Batt-Rawden, a senior ICU registrar in the Southeast and President of the Doctor & # 39; s Association UK, warned of pressure from the NHS

Dr. Samantha Batt-Rawden, a senior ICU registrar in the Southeast and President of the Doctor & # 39; s Association UK, warned of pressure from the NHS

"While the NHS is opening more beds in places like London to care for the most sick patients, it is important that people continue to follow government orders and do everything possible to reduce transmission of the virus."

Despite the chaos scenes at the NHS, officials began dismantling Nightingale hospitals today. It was supposed to be the nightingales built during the first wave at a cost of £ 220 million for the taxpayer The NHS insurance policy in case hospitals were overcrowded with patients with the disease.

But only a handful of Covid patients have ever been treated in the hospitals because No10 struggled to staff them with trained staff.

Dr. Walsh said: & # 39;Today many trusts in London and the South East operate effectively in a major event mode.

“They have crisis meetings, they urge employees to come to work if they are able to do so on their days off.

“You have to deal with queues of ambulances outside of many emergency rooms, often with patients who sat in the ambulance for hours before they could be unloaded into the department because there was simply no room for them.

“The physical space for admitting patients is scarce, the staff are exhausted and suffer from the effects of depression, stress and burnout because they are simply overworked and cannot get breaks when they work on their days off.

"So we really need a coherent government plan to get through these next few weeks, because right now what we are hearing does not make us feel confident."

Dr. Walsh added: “I would like to ask people to listen to the staff, doctors and nurses who work in NHS hospitals and emergency rooms across the UK. Listen to what they say.

& # 39; We are absolutely clear that the NHS is under unprecedented demand. The NHS is resilient and is dealing with many very difficult times, but the ongoing nature of this unprecedented pressure on the NHS and emergency services is truly unprecedented. & # 39;

Empty nightingales demolished "because there aren't enough doctors to keep them busy"

Nightingale hospitals are quietly being dismantled as medical professionals warn that there are too few doctors and nurses to keep shift facilities open.

Health bosses have already started removing London's 4,000 beds, ventilators and even signs directing patients to wards, while those in Birmingham and Sunderland have not yet reopened.

Seven nightingales caught in panic hospitals were overwhelmed by an influx of Covid-19 patients during the first wave.

But many stood empty for months after ministers called them a "solution" to the Covid-19 crisis when they were opened to many fans in the early months of the pandemic to cushion overwhelmed hospitals.

Critical care medics today accused ministers of ignoring warnings. The ICU staff was already “paper thin” before the additional capacity was used up, regardless of how it would be operated.

And when the beds were rolled away from the flagship Nightingale, London opened by Prince Charles, the numbers showed that Covid-19 hospital stays in England had passed the peak of the first wave, amid warnings from health chiefs they are back to watch the Covid storm.

Just because people don't see pictures of patients on carts in crowded corridors doesn't mean that hospitals aren't overwhelmed and that infection control measures need to be considered.

He said, "One of the most important things people need to understand is that if they don't see queues of patients in corridors, it is not because we are not overwhelmed, but because we have capacity and at the same time ensure the safety of these patients. "

London A&E doctor Sonia Adesara warned that the capital's hospitals are on the verge of congestion if coronavirus infection rates are not brought under control.

She told BBC Breakfast: "The hospitals are very busy – we've seen a massive increase in people with Covid-19 in the past week, and this adds to an increase in the number of non-Covid cases that we're seeing right now year.

“Just like in the first wave, we also suffer from a shortage of staff, the employees are getting Covid-19 again and it is extremely difficult, the hospitals are very full.

"The situation is unsustainable and I think we are on the verge of being overwhelmed."

Official figures show that a quarter of English hospitals treated a "dangerous" number of Covid patients in the run-up to Christmas.

MailOnlines analysis of data from NHS England shows that at least a fifth of general beds in 37 trusts were occupied by Covid patients in the week ended December 22nd.

Top experts have warned of a danger zone where coronavirus patients injure 20 percent of hospital occupancy and the disease is affecting non-Covid services and increasing the risk of outbreaks on wards.

Two trusts were twice as high as this threshold in the past week. The coronavirus took over 45 percent of the beds at the Medway NHS Foundation Trust in Kent and four out of ten beds at the North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust.

A third of the beds in four other trusts in Kent and London – East Kent Hospitals University Trust (37 percent), Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells Trust (35 percent), Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals Trust (34 percent), and Dartford and Gravesham Trust (33 percent) – were used for patients with the disease. However, analysts following the outbreak fear 14 trusts will cross the 33 percent threshold by New Year's Eve.

Coronavirus patients must be kept in isolation and treated with strict infection control measures, which require more staff and man hours and can add additional strain to hospitals.

So it is important to keep the Covid occupancy below 20 percent so as not to disturb other parts of the NHS.

NHS chiefs are under great pressure this winter to keep routine services open after they came under fire for closing in the spring due to the pandemic. This resulted in millions of important tests, appointments, and operations being missed.

Analysis of the NHS numbers shows that every region of England saw an increase in Covid hospital patients in the past week after SAGE called for a third national lockdown.

The biggest increase was in London, where the number of beds occupied by Covid patients every day rose 44 percent from 1,552 to 2,237.

Sir Simon Stevens, head of NHS England, has warned that healthcare is "in the eye of the storm" before the harsh winter months, as more Covid patients are already living in English hospitals than on the darkest days in April, and the second wave is on further spiral.

A total of 20,426 beds were occupied by patients who tested positive for coronavirus at 8 a.m. on Monday, up from 18,974 on April 12. More than half of the 130 major trusts in England are already more than 90 percent occupied, and some are seeing Covid shots double every week, This leaves hospitals little room to breathe and the worst winter is ahead of them.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) News (t) NHS (t) London (t) Coronavirus