ENTERTAINMENT

Patagonia is creating controversy by embroidering “Voting the A ** Holes Out” on clothing labels


Patagonia is creating controversy by sewing “Voting the A ** Holes Out” on the inside of its clothing labels

  • Patagonia's raw call to vote went viral over the weekend
  • The message is featured on tags in the outdoor clothing brand's newest line of shorts
  • The move received mixed reactions online as some fans said they couldn't wait to shop for new Patagonia gear while others panned it as a cheap marketing ploy
  • Twitter users agreed the news was a not-so-subtle shot at Donald Trump
  • However, Patagonia Representative Tessa Byers claimed it was not directed against the president
  • "It refers to politicians from any party who deny or ignore the climate crisis … because their pockets are filled with money from oil and gas interests," she said

Patagonia sparked controversy by hiding the phrase "Vote the a ** hole out" on a label in its latest line of shorts.

The outdoor apparel company's crude call for customers to vote – viewed by many as a not-so-subtle shot at President Donald Trump – went viral on social media over the weekend after being spotted by eagle-eyed fans.

A spokesman for Patagonia, who has long been involved in environmental activism, confirmed the political message was woven into the labels on the waistband of his 2020 organic stand-up shorts, “Men and Women Recuperating”.

"We've been fighting climate deniers for almost as long as we've made these shorts," said spokeswoman Tessa Byers.

Byers said the phrase had been a favorite of Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard for years, adding that it was not specifically addressed to Trump.

"It refers to politicians from any party who deny or ignore the climate crisis and ignore science, not because they are ignorant of it, but because their pockets are filled with money from oil and gas interests," she said.

Patagonia sparked controversy by hiding the phrase "Vote the a ** Holes Out" on a label in its latest line of shorts

A spokeswoman for Patagonia insisted that the message was directed not to President Donald Trump, but to

A spokeswoman for Patagonia insisted that the message was not addressed to President Donald Trump but to "politicians from any party who deny or ignore the climate crisis".

The California-based brand's day stunt came when the west coast was devastated by hundreds of forest fires that burned millions of acres last month. This caused some politicians in the affected states to mock Trump for denying that climate change is happening.

The move received mixed reactions on Twitter as some users said they couldn't wait to get their hands on Patagonia gear by the day.

CNN reporter Ana Navarro tweeted: & # 39; @patagonia, can you confirm if this is correct? Because I'll go online right now and buy parkas in every color … and I live in Miami. & # 39;

Georgia Democrat Sen Jen Jordan said, "With parts of our country literally on fire and being destroyed by the effects of climate change, this couldn't be more welcome."

It is long past listening to the experts and doing something. Vote like your planet is on fire! & # 39;

Meanwhile, other users waved the tags as a marketing ploy and vowed to boycott the brand.

"I can't wait for them to go bankrupt," one man wrote alongside the hashtag # Trump2020.

“My husband has worn Patagonia since the early 80s. He won't buy anything else from them. The bourgeois discourse no longer exists, ”added another critic.

Many Twitter users praised Patagonia for the bold message, saying they couldn't wait to get their hands on more of the brand's gear

Many Twitter users praised Patagonia for the bold message, saying they couldn't wait to get their hands on more of the brand's gear

Meanwhile, other users waved the tags as a marketing ploy and vowed to boycott the brand

Meanwhile, other users waved the tags as a marketing ploy and vowed to boycott the brand

This isn't the first time Patagonia has made headlines by diving into politics.

In 2017, the company sued President Trump after reducing the size of Utah's Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monuments by two million acres.

And in 2018, Patagonia donated $ 10 million in tax cuts to environmental programs that raise awareness about climate change.

The company closed its headquarters, distribution center and branches nationwide on election days in 2016 and 2018 – and plans to do so in November.

Patagonia recently partnered with BallotReady to create its own polling website where customers can enter their address and get relevant information on how to request ballot papers and find polling stations.

"We have to choose climate leaders," it says on the website. "The 2020 US Senate races will have a significant and lasting impact on the strength of our nation's climate policies and the existence of our wild places."

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