ENTERTAINMENT

Parler's CEO says he did MORE than Facebook and Twitter to remove violent content


Parler CEO John Matze warned in his last post before 3am that "we will likely be down longer than expected" as technology companies distance themselves from the site

Parler CEO John Matze said Monday that he had done more than Facebook and Twitter to remove violent content from his app after it was removed from the internet overnight.

The right-hand social media site disappeared from the Apple and Google app stores after the tech giants disconnected from the platform following the deadly mob attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Parler went offline just after 3 a.m. EST after Amazon booted the platform from its web hosting service and effectively shut it down until a new hosting partner could be found.

In a statement Monday morning, self-proclaimed libertarian Matze stated, "Our system has been objectively assessed and worked as well or better than the methods used by our competitors, while adhering to our principles."

He argued that "by Friday afternoon, Apple, Amazon and Google seemed to be in agreement" that the app had been effective in their efforts to remove "objectionable content", adding, "You can expect the war on competition as well freedom of speech continues, but not. " Don't count us out. & # 39;

The loss of access to the app stores from Google and Apple significantly limits Parler's reach to millions of smartphones. Losing Amazon Web Services means Parler will have to find another web host that can be accessed through a browser.

Matze had originally said that Parler could potentially be down for "up to a week if we build from scratch" but now says it could potentially be offline longer. Google and Apple booted Gab from their app stores in 2017 and it has been homeless on the internet for a while. It now hosts on its own server.

Critics continued to condemn the big tech giants for scrubbing free speech after the app was removed from the internet and Donald Trump was banned from Twitter.

Fox's new host Jeanine Pirro later argued that her deplatforming "resembles a Kristallnacht". In 1938, Nazis in Germany and Austria destroyed Jewish homes, schools, and shops during an attack known as Kristallnacht.

She said, “They gave us a taste of that area code when they suppressed the Hunter Biden story. And now that they have won, we are seeing a kind of censorship, resembling a Kristallnacht, where they decide what we can communicate about. & # 39;

Donald Trump Jr. said it was a "purge of conservative ideas and thought leaders".

Piers Morgan wrote: & # 39; It was pretty scary to watch the speed with which the tech world has conspired to take advantage of the Capitol uprising to not just Trump but whole right-wing social media platforms like Parler to silence that were effectively driven offline by Google. Apple and Amazon. & # 39;

Twitter saw its shares fall 10 percent shortly after the bell opened on Monday as the company prepared for MAGA protesters outside San Francisco headquarters after the president was banned from the platform.

Parler is hailed by Donald Trump supporters as a conservative-friendly alternative to Twitter. Considered a magnet for the far right, he has been accused by Apple, Google, and Amazon of continuing to allow violent messages after the attack on the Capitol on Wednesday

Parler is hailed by Donald Trump supporters as a conservative-friendly alternative to Twitter. Considered a magnet for the far right, he has been accused by Apple, Google, and Amazon of continuing to allow violent messages after the attack on the Capitol on Wednesday

Shortly after 3 p.m. EST, Parler disappeared from the Internet with an "We can't connect to the server" error after Amazon pulled the plug

Shortly after 3 p.m. EST, Parler disappeared from the Internet with an "We can't connect to the server" error after Amazon pulled the plug

The app was removed from the Google App Store after conservative social media users came to the site after the Capitol attack

The app was removed from the Google App Store after conservative social media users came to the site after the Capitol attack

What options does Parler have now?

The loss of access to the app stores from Google and Apple, whose operating systems power hundreds of millions of smartphones, severely limits Parler's range, although access via the web browser was still possible.

Amazon Web Services' decision to remove Parler means it will now need to be encrypted to find another web host, in addition to "rebuilding the website from scratch".

Google and Apple booted Gab out of their app stores in 2017 and made Gab homeless for some time on the internet the following year after the man was credited with anti-Semitic contributions alleged to have killed 11 people in a Pittsburgh synagogue. Microsoft has also canceled a web hosting contract.

It is now hosted on its own servers so this is an option.

Or it can find another server ready to host the site. Max Aliapoulios, a graduate student in computer science, told Business Insider, “It is realistic to expect Parler to find another provider to host its services such as AWS.

That being said, the precedent is now set and Parler will likely always have an uphill battle finding a home to host them on the internet. "

The site was hailed by Donald Trump supporters as a conservative-friendly alternative to Twitter, which finally suspended the president on Friday. She is considered a magnet for the far-right party and has been accused by Apple, Google and Amazon of continuing to allow messages inciting violence on Wednesday's uprising.

Parler, which Apple claims was used by some rioters to plan the uprising, was the most downloaded app in the Apple Store on Friday before both Apple and Google blocked access to their app stores.

CEO John Matze warned in his last post before the 3am deadline that "we will likely be down longer than expected" as tech companies distance themselves from the "free speech" side.

"The statements by Amazon, Google and Apple to the press about the blocking of our access have meant that most of our other providers have also stopped supporting us," said Matze, who considered the Big Tech measures to isolate his app "absolutely disgusting".

& # 39; Parler is my last stand on the internet. I will not create an account in any social area. Parler is my home, ”he said. He later issued a press release condemning violence, arguing that the app had "worked hard" to "remove prohibited content".

After Parler's removal, the president's eldest son retweeted a post that read, "The internet was a hell of a lot safer before @Twitter, @Apple, @Google and @Facebook protected us from it." Don Jr. added, "1000 this time."

Republican Congressman Devin Nunes, who had an account with Parler, raged over "political censorship" after Apple and Google removed the app.

"Spread the word so your fellow Americans know about it," he urged his three million followers on the website.

Journalist Glenn Greenwald accused the tech giants on Sunday of "faking Parler into destroying a crime". He claimed that "a lot more violence" was planned on Facebook.

Right-wing expert Ben Shapiro warned on Twitter that "the tech brothers are making a terrible and dangerous moment much more terrible and dangerous".

& # 39; No uniform standards are applied. There is reactionary deplatforming on behalf of one side, ”he claimed.

"Everyone on the right is rightly concerned that the same companies are five minutes away from depriving Conservatives of hosting content anywhere."

The crackdown on social media has rekindled a debate over whether tech giants should be treated as "publishers" with the same liability as news providers.

In his last post before the 3am deadline, Matze said that "most people with enough servers to host us have closed their doors on us".

In his last post before the 3am deadline, Matze said that "most people with enough servers to host us have closed their doors on us".

The effects of the permanent Trump ban on Twitter continued over the weekend as his eldest son hit the social media website and loyalists fled to alternatives like Gab and Parler.

& # 39; The world is laughing at America and Mao, Lenin and Stalin are smiling. Big Tech Can Censor the President? Freedom of speech is dead and controlled by left overlords, "Don Trump Jr. said in a tweet on Saturday, calling on supporters to join his mailing list." In case I'm next "

Parler is funded by well-known conservative donor Rebekah Mercer

Parler, who describes himself as "free of speech," is funded by the daughter of Rebekah of hedge fund investor Robert Mercer, the Wall Street Journal reported in November.

Rebekah described her as the co-founder of the website with CEO John Matze.

"John and I founded Parler to provide a neutral platform for free speech, as our founders intended, and to create a social media environment that protects privacy," she wrote in a post on the website this fall .

"The growing tyranny and hubris of our tech overlords requires someone to lead the fight against data mining and to protect freedom of speech online," she added.

Hedge fund investor Robert Mercer is pictured with his daughter Rebekah in 2017

Hedge fund investor Robert Mercer is pictured with his daughter Rebekah in 2017

Matze replied to the post: “Bekah is a great friend, an American patriot and above all committed to the Parler vision of neutrality and data protection. We are grateful for their support since 2018 and their early trust in the founders enabled us to reach these heights. #Transparency. & # 39;

After WSJ reported Rebekah's links to Parler, she issued a statement that her multimillionaire father Robert was not an investor on the site – while sources close to the clan claimed the investment was a family affair.

Rebekah named herself a co-founder of Parler in a post on the website in November

Rebekah named herself a co-founder of Parler in a post on the website in November

On Friday, Twitter also banned two Trump loyalists – former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn and attorney Sidney Powell – as part of a broader clean-up of accounts promoting the QAnon conspiracy theory.

Its CEO Jack Dorsey reportedly made an extraordinary call to permanently suspend Trump's account while on vacation in French Polynesia.

After Twitter red flagged some of Trump's posts last year, the president demanded that the website be exempted from a "liability shield" known as Section 230.

Fox News' personality Dan Bongino, a Parler fanatic, raved: "The greatest threats to freedom are the destructive technology tyrants who have acted as publishers in their ongoing wars against conservatives and free speech."

"This will be my last post on this anti-American platform," he wrote on Twitter on Friday.

Concerns about the power of big tech are not limited to the American right, however. Angela Merkel's spokesman calls it "problematic" today that freedom of speech could be hindered by "decisions about the management of social media platforms".

Lionel Barber, former editor of the London Financial Times, said on Sunday: "Now we can agree that platforms are publishers and that freedom of expression is limited. We need a serious debate about the influence of social media on modern democracy. "

And British Minister Matt Hancock said the Trump ban "raises a very important question about what it means that social media platforms are making editorial decisions".

Many Democrats also want to limit the power of big tech. Dozens of attorneys general filed a lawsuit last month to break into Facebook.

Launched in 2018, Parler works similarly to Twitter with profiles that people can follow and Parleys instead of Tweets.

"Our mission is to create a social platform in the spirit of the first amendment to the United States Constitution," she boasts. "We prefer to keep removal of community members or member-posted content to an absolute minimum."

Overall, the website has more than 12 million users, although the analysis company Sensor Tower puts the number at 10 million worldwide and eight million in the US.

Founded by computer engineer Matze and Republican donor Rebekah Mercer, it attracts a mix of far-right users and more traditional Republican voices – and is already used by the president's children, Don Jr., Eric, and Ivanka.

Fox News star host Sean Hannity has 7.6 million followers on Parler, while colleague Tucker Carlson has 4.4 million.

There are also elected officials, including Nunes and South Dakota Republican Governor Kristi Noem.

Trump supporters flocked to the app after the president was banned from Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and other websites following the violence at the Capitol.

But despite speculation that Trump would join Parler himself, he didn't have a known account at the time the site closed today.

Late on Friday, Google announced that Parler would be banned from its app store because posts incite violence and the content is occasionally moderated.

Apple followed suit a day later after alleging that Parler was being used to "plan and facilitate more illegal and dangerous activity."

Apple had given Parler 24 hours to come up with a detailed moderation schedule, claiming attendees used the service to coordinate the siege on Wednesday.

Public safety issues must be resolved before access to Parler is restored, Apple said.

The steps taken by Apple and Google drastically limited Parler's reach, but didn't completely block the app as people who already had it could continue to use it while new users could access it through a web browser.

However, Amazon's decision to revoke Parler's access to the Amazon Web Services hosting platform directly jeopardizes the website's online presence.

The president's daughter Ivanka Trump was among those who set up a Parler account when conservatives unhappy with Twitter flocked to the site

The president's daughter Ivanka Trump was among those who set up a Parler account when conservatives unhappy with Twitter flocked to the site

Sean Hannity, Donald Trump's favorite Fox News host, also had an account on the site

Sean Hannity, Donald Trump's favorite Fox News host, also had an account on the site

The journalist tweeted on Sunday to accuse tech giants of "faking the crime to destroy the app" after Donald Trump was launched on most major social media platforms on Friday

The journalist tweeted on Sunday to accuse tech giants of "faking the crime to destroy the app" after Donald Trump was launched on most major social media platforms on Friday

Amazon said it had informed Parler of 98 examples of posts "that clearly encourage and incite violence" and said the platform "poses a very real risk to public safety".

"We have seen a steady increase in this violent content on your site, all of which violate our Terms of Use," read an Amazon letter first reported by Buzzfeed.

Given the riots in the Capitol this week, the letter went on to say, there is "a serious risk that this type of content will further fuel the violence."

Parler had 24 hours to find an alternate host, but Matze said, "Where can you find 300 to 500 servers in a 24-hour window … it's an impossible feat."

“What they are doing is unprecedented, baseless, and utterly disgusting. Shameful, ”said Matze of the tech giants.

“Our mission is free speech, democracy and we, the people, who have power. The elite don't want us to be free, they want hatred, division and power. & # 39;

Tech giants have scrambled to shut down what they believe is dangerous online content after a Trump-instigated mob overran the seat of American democracy (pictured)

Tech giants have scrambled to shut down what they believe is dangerous online content after a Trump-instigated mob overran the seat of American democracy (pictured)

As the process gets faster, conservative websites may have to follow the lead of another website popular far right, Gab.

This platform was heavily criticized in 2018 when investigators discovered that the gunman who killed 11 people in an attack on a synagogue in Pittsburgh had previously posted anti-Semitic messages on the website.

Gab, who had already come into conflict with Apple and Google, then installed his own server so as not to be dependent on external providers.

Meanwhile, the DLive video streaming service, which was used by several protesters during the Capitol invasion, has closed seven of its channels and removed more than 100 videos from the website.

How Parler CEO John Matze married "Russian, whom he met on her US road trip" before founding the "Freedom of Speech" platform now funded by conservative donor Rebekah Mercer and used by MAGA fans

By Lauren Fruen for DailyMail.com

John Matze founded Parler in 2018 as a "free speech" alternative to mainstream platforms.

The self-described libertarian soon began wooing right-wing users when prominent Donald Trump supporters moved there.

And Parler had been the leading candidate for president to continue to voice his opinion, at least until Google and Apple removed them from their app stores and Amazon decided to launch them from its web hosting service on Sunday.

Not much is known about Matzes personal life, but he is said to have married Russian Alina Mukhutdinova after the two are said to have met in Las Vegas.

She is said to have been on a two-week road trip through the United States. TED Talk host Dave Troy reported in November.

Alina's Instagram photos reveal that the couple have at least one child. In one picture she is holding guns and wearing a t-shirt that says, "Trust me, I'm a Russian spy."

The couple appear to lead a luxurious lifestyle with numerous vacation photos taken with their young child.

John Matze founded Parler in 2018 as a "free speech" alternative to mainstream platforms. He is pictured with his family

John Matze founded Parler in 2018 as a "free speech" alternative to mainstream platforms. He is pictured with his family

Not much is known about Matzes personal life, but he is said to have married the pictured Russian Alina Mukhutdinova after the two are said to have met in Las Vegas

Not much is known about Matzes personal life, but he is said to have married the pictured Russian Alina Mukhutdinova after the two are said to have met in Las Vegas

After graduating in 2014, Matze, who studied math, German, and economics at the University of Denver, founded Parler with his colleague Jared Thomson, who is now the Chief Technical Officer.

Matze told Forbes in July last year, "I don't have too many friends, but the ones I have, we just talk to each other about ideas – crazy, simple, whatever."

He told the magazine that he "doesn't watch TV" but "gets everything from Parler".

Alina shared this picture of her husband, which appears on Fox News, on her Instagram account

Alina shared this picture of her husband, which appears on Fox News, on her Instagram account

One of Alina's Instagram pictures shows how she is promoting her husband's Parler app

One of Alina's Instagram pictures shows how she is promoting her husband's Parler app

Matze's app is now funded by Robert Mercer's daughter Rebekah, a hedge fund investor, the Wall Street Journal reported in November.

The two-year-old magnet for the far-right party claims more than 12 million users, although mobile app analyst Sensor Tower estimates the number at 10 million worldwide, including 8 million in the US.

Rebekah described herself as the co-founder of the website with Matze. She is also said to have studied at the University of Denver.

"John and I founded Parler to provide a neutral platform for free speech, as our founders intended, and to create a social media environment that protects privacy," she wrote in a post on the website this fall .

"The growing tyranny and hubris of our tech overlords requires someone to lead the fight against data mining and to protect freedom of speech online," she added.

Matze replied to the post: “Bekah is a great friend, an American patriot and above all committed to the Parler vision of neutrality and data protection. We are grateful for their support since 2018 and their early trust in the founders enabled us to reach these heights. #Transparency. & # 39;

After WSJ reported Rebekah's links to Parler, she issued a statement that her multimillionaire father Robert was not an investor on the site – while sources close to the clan claimed the investment was a family affair.

Parler members include commentator Candace Owens, Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani, and right-wing activist Laura Loomer, who tied herself to the door of Twitter's New York office in November 2018 to protest a ban on the site.

Trump's sons Eric and Don Jr. are also already active on the website.

Alina's Instagram photos reveal that the couple have at least one child

Alina's Instagram photos reveal that the couple have at least one child

Not much is known about Matzes personal life, but he is said to have married Russian Alina Mukhutdinova after the two are said to have met in Las Vegas

She is said to have been on a two-week road trip through the United States, TED Talk host Dave Troy reported in November

Not much is known about Matzes personal life, but he is said to have married Russian Alina Mukhutdinova after the two are said to have met in Las Vegas. She is said to have been on a two-week road trip through the United States, TED Talk host Dave Troy reported in November.

The couple appear to live a luxurious lifestyle with numerous vacation pictures

The couple appear to live a luxurious lifestyle with numerous vacation pictures

However, Parler encountered headwinds on Friday when Google tore its smartphone app from the App Store to allow postings intended to "trigger ongoing violence in the US."

Apple followed on Saturday night after Parler had 24 hours to process complaints that "planned and facilitated further illegal and dangerous activity." Public safety issues need to be resolved before they can be restored, Apple said.

Amazon struck again on Saturday and informed Parler that they would have to look for a new web hosting service at midnight on Sunday.

In a letter first reported by Buzzfeed, he reminded Parler that in the past few weeks he had been informed of 98 examples of posts "that clearly encourage and incite violence" and that the platform "posed a very real risk for public safety represents ".

Matze described the punishment as a "coordinated attack by technology giants to kill competition in the market". We were too successful too quickly, "he said in a post on Saturday night, saying it was possible that Parler would be unavailable for up to a week" if we build from scratch. "

"Every provider, from SMS services to e-mail providers to our lawyers, drove us into the abyss on the same day," said Matze on Sunday in Fox New Channel's Sunday Morning Futures.

He said while the company is trying to get back online as soon as possible, it's having big problems because every vendor we speak to says they won't be working with us because if Apple doesn't agree and Google doesn't does "Disagree, they won't."

The loss of access to the app stores from Google and Apple, whose operating systems power hundreds of millions of smartphones, severely limits Parler's range, although access will still be possible via a web browser.

The loss of Amazon Web Services means Parler will have to look for another web host in addition to re-engineering.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Messages (t) Google (t) Twitter (t) Donald Trump