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Over 50-year-olds could be faced with home order in Boris Johnson's "nuclear plans"


A large number of people over the age of 50 could be ordered to stay at home under Boris Johnson's "nuclear plans" to avoid further national closure.

In a more "segmented approach" to dealing with future closures, people between 50 and 70 would receive personalized risk assessments taking into account factors such as age and conditions, and would be asked to provide protection in the event of an outbreak.

The plans could prove controversial, as the factors that could encourage older people to self-isolate could be more affected by age than clinical weaknesses.

The Council for Shielding was only lifted on Saturday for those in England, Scotland and Northern Ireland and will apply until August 16th for those who are shielded in Wales.

This happened after Mr. Johnson was forced to announce a slowdown in easing relief on Friday. Planned easing for the leisure and beauty sectors was delayed after an increase in Covid 19 cases, with community prevalence seen as increasing for the first time since May.

In other developments yesterday:

  • Britain suffers 771 more Covid-19 cases and 74 deaths due to warnings that the infection rate could be at the "turning point".
  • Eden in Cumbria, Sandwell in the Midlands, Northampton, Peterborough, Rotherham and Wakefield were announced yesterday as six locations on the government's coronavirus watchlist.
  • Passengers arriving at Heathrow Terminal 5 were angry after being forced to queue for hours without social distance.
  • Holland's top scientists said that there is no solid evidence for coverage work and warned that they could even damage the fight against Covid-19;
  • Russia is preparing to launch a mass coronavirus vaccination campaign in October, with teachers and doctors first;
  • Arsenal fans ignored Covid-19's social distancing rules to celebrate outside the Emirates Stadium after the Gunners defeated Chelsea in the FA Cup final.

A large number of people over the age of 50 could be ordered to stay at home under Boris Johnson's "nuclear plans" to avoid further national closure

"At the moment the shielding is binary, you're either on this list or not," said a Sunday Times source.

“However, we know that there is no simple limit at the age of 70. People would get a personalized risk assessment. The risk increases very gently after 50 years and then accelerates after the age of 70. & # 39;

The Prime Minister held a "war game" session with Chancellor Rishi Sunak on Wednesday to discuss possible options to avert another nationwide ban that could prevent a possible economic recovery, the newspaper said.

It is believed that last week Mr. Johnson compared the prospect of a complete national blockade with "nuclear deterrence" as a last resort, but the aides now say he wants smaller "tactical" nuclear weapons to fight Covid-19.

The group held for an hour with the head of the Covid-19 task force, Simon Case, Mr. Sunak and other high-profile personalities Discussion of three outbreak scenarios; one in North West England, one in London and finally a general increase across the country.

In a more "segmented approach" to dealing with future closures, people between 50 and 70 would receive personalized risk assessments taking into account factors such as age and conditions, and would be asked to provide protection in the event of an outbreak

In a more "segmented approach" to dealing with future closures, people between 50 and 70 would receive personalized risk assessments taking into account factors such as age and conditions, and would be asked to provide protection in the event of an outbreak

An important proposal in the national model was the reintroduction of the Shielding program based on age or certain risk factors identified since March.

Other ideas that should come into play in the event of an escalation of the R-phrase in the capital include restricting travel beyond the M25 and discontinuing residence in other people's homes, similar to recent times in Leicester and parts of the Northwest England imposed local day lock policies.

And in a move that would burst the pictorial "bubbles" to the public, ministers could prohibit indoor mixing (including overnight stays), as was done in the nine local authorities with partial closures in north-west England.

The move could have been inspired by test and trace data that Health Minister Matt Hancock had seen just prior to the meeting, showing that the two main types of transmission of the virus were from an infected person who visited the subject's home, and from this person who was visiting an infected friend.

Cases are on the rise … and the rate can be over one

Coronavirus cases in England are now at their highest since May, and government scientists are no longer confident that the crucial R rate is below the feared one level.

Government statistics yesterday admitted that "there is now enough evidence" to prove that Covid-19 infections are on the rise and that 4,200 people will contract the virus every day in England alone.

The National Statistics Office's estimate, which measures the size of the outbreak by wiping thousands of people, has doubled since the end of June and is 68 percent higher than 2,500 two weeks ago.

One in 1,500 people currently have the corona virus – 0.07 percent of the population. However, experts believe that the rate in London is twice as high and is still increasing. Nursing homes and hospitals are not included in this figure.

The number 10 scientific advisers have also increased the R rate in the UK, saying they now believe it is between 0.8 and 0.9. Since May it was only 0.7.

SAGE also revealed the growth rate – the average number of people infected by each Covid-19 patient – that may have exceeded one in the southwest, where the hot spots for stays in Devon, Cornwall, and Dorset are located. And they said it would probably be the same height in the northwest. Matt Hancock announced stringent new closures last night in Greater Manchester and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire.

Going to work was only the third on the list and going shopping even deeper.

But Downing Street sources distanced themselves from the details in the reports and called them "speculative."

In addition to the alleged preparations to avoid barriers, experts have speculated that ministers may have to order pubs to be closed, which could be restarted on July 4 if schools are due to reopen in September.

Professor Graham Medley, member of the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (Sage), said earlier that a "compromise" might be needed if the Prime Minister's promise was to be kept.

His comments followed Chief Medical Officer Professor Chris Whitty’s comments that after the Corona virus was blocked, the country was “close to the border” for opening society.

The move to Whitehall is seen as a clear indication that ministers are ready to end social interactions to ensure that schools can reopen next month and that business can continue.

Boris Johnson had previously agreed that all primary and secondary school students in England will return in September after most students have closed for months.

But leading scientists and the head of a large teaching union have seen signs of Covid-19 increasing at an alarming rate last night.

Patrick Roach, general secretary of the NASUWT teachers' union, said the government had to "clear" the schools.

He said to the observer, "Given the recent changes to the plans to ease the blocking measures, the government needs to give school leaders, teachers and parents more clarity about what this will mean for the reopening of schools in September."

A warning from chief physician Professor Chris Whitty that the country is "close to the border" for the opening up of society will pose questions for both parents and teachers, Roach told the newspaper.

“If schools are to be reopened safely, the government needs to clarify what they need to do to take into account the latest scientific knowledge and advice, and enough time to review and, if necessary, adjust their reopening plans. & # 39; he added.

In the meantime, Dr. Paul Hunter, professor of medicine at the University of East Anglia, told the observer that this transmission would increase infection rates, although the risks for children and teachers are likely to be low.

The Prime Minister held a "war game" session with Chancellor Rishi Sunak on Wednesday to discuss possible options to avert another nationwide ban that could prevent a possible economic recovery

The Prime Minister held a "war game" session with Chancellor Rishi Sunak on Wednesday to discuss possible options to avert another nationwide ban that could prevent a possible economic recovery

“Would reopening schools increase the spread of Covid-19 in the population? Yes. I think that would most likely do it, ”he told the newspaper.

A member of the Scientific Advisory Group on Emergency (Sage) said ministers may need to consider closing pubs in England so classes can start again next month.

The wise member warns England that it should consider closing pubs to open schools next month

Professor Graham Medley, member of the Sage Scientific Advisory Group, said that England may have to consider closing pubs to reopen schools next month.

When asked about chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty's prediction that the country was "close to the borders" of opening up society, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine scientist told BBC Radio 4's Today program: " I think that is quite possible.

“I think we are in a situation where most people think that opening schools is a priority for children's health and well-being and that in this case we will reconnect many households.

“So if we close some of the other networks, some other activities may be needed to open schools.

"It could be a question of balancing each other and then it's about setting priorities. Do we think pubs are more important than schools?"

Professor Graham Medley, chairman of the Sage pandemic modeling subgroup, said this scenario was "quite possible".

"I think we are in a situation where most people think that opening schools is a priority for children's health and well-being and that in this case we will reconnect many households," he told BBC Radio 4's Today broadcast.

“So if we close some of the other networks, some other activities may be needed to open schools.

"It could be a question of balancing each other and then it's about setting priorities. Do we think pubs are more important than schools?"

In the meantime, the Department of Health and Social Welfare (DHSC) had to deny that it had given up its promise to regularly test nursing home residents in the summer, according to a leaked memo from Professor Jane Cummings, head of the government's adult social tests .

The Tory government has been criticized for not doing anything during the first spring summit to prevent Covid-19 infections from getting into nursing homes that house some of the most vulnerable populations in the country.

According to the Times, Prof. Cummings wrote to local government officials to inform them that "previously recommended schedules for the introduction of regular nursing home tests" have been changed due to "unexpected delays".

Regular testing of residents and employees should have started on July 6, but will be postponed until September 7, according to the PA news agency, for the elderly and people with dementia.

A department spokeswoman confirmed that there were problems with "asymptomatic retests".

The issues relate to a combination of factors, including a limitation in the ability to build test kits, previously announced issues with Randox swab kits, overall laboratory capacity, and a higher than expected response rate of nursing home test kits.

The DHSC spokeswoman said: "It is completely wrong to say that nursing homes are intentionally deprived of test resources and that any resident of a nursing home or employee with symptoms can immediately access a free test.

& # 39; We continue to conduct at least 50,000 tests per day for nursing homes across the country and prioritize tests for areas at higher risk.

"A combination of factors has resulted in a limited number of test kits, mostly used in nursing homes, being available for asymptomatic retesting. We work with vendors around the clock to restore capacity."

The DHSC said there would be no comments on leaked documents when asked about Prof. Cummings' memo.

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