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ONS estimates 3,700 people are infected every day in England – a decrease of 12% per week


Coronavirus cases could be on the way down again after weeks of boom. Official data today revealed growing fears of a second wave in the UK.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS), which measures the size of the outbreak by wiping thousands of people, now estimates that 3,700 people are infected with Covid-19 every day in England.

It's 12 percent lower than the 4,200 the government agency's estimate made last week when they warned there was "enough evidence" to prove the cases were spiraling. The spike in cases prompted Boris Johnson to state that he hit the brake pedal to ease the coronavirus blockage.

The ONS estimates that between July 27 and August 2, 28,300 people in England had the coronavirus – that's one in 1,900 people. By comparison, the rate last week was one in 1,500.

Separate government figures suggest an increase in cases last month, and health chiefs recorded another 950 infections yesterday – the highest daily number since June 26 (1,006).

However, top scientists have argued that the numbers do not constitute evidence of a second wave and are merely due to an increase in testing in areas affected by outbreaks of the disease.

In other coronavirus developments in the UK today:

  • The British have been urged to stay away from crowded beaches amid overcrowded fears on what may be the UK's hottest day, with the Sahara air reaching temperatures above 38 ° C for the second time in a week.
  • Rishi Sunak strongly warned the British that the government "will not hesitate" to take action by imposing quarantine bans, fearing France could be the next vacation destination to face coronavirus curbs.
  • Tory MPs have argued with Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham over his claims that it is "impossible" to lift lockdown restrictions in just one district before a review is conducted today.
  • More than 100,000 people in the UK could have died from coronavirus if the government hadn't told people to stay at home, according to research.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS), which measures the size of the outbreak by wiping thousands of people, now estimates that 3,700 people are infected with Covid-19 every day in England. It's 12 percent lower than the 4,200 the government agency's estimate made last week when they warned there was "enough evidence" to prove the cases were spiraling

BRITONS TO BE KEEP AWAY FROM BEACHES AS NATION BRACES FOR ITS HOTTEST DAY

The British were urged to stay away from crowded beaches today amid overcrowded fears on what may be the hottest day in the UK, with the Sahara air surpassing 38C for the second time in a week.

Mercury is expected to hit at least 37 ° C (99 ° F) today in London and the South East, with a chance the 100 ° F (37.8 ° F) recorded at London's Heathrow Airport – the UK's third hottest day ever ° C) could be broken last Friday.

Beaches on the south coast were already overcrowded in the mornings, adding to fears by police and local authorities that tourists might ignore coronavirus social distancing rules and crowd onto crowded coastlines.

Temperatures that afternoon could even surpass the UK record of 38.7 ° C (101.7 ° F) set last July. But unlike last Friday, when clouds and drizzle followed, the heat wave will be here until at least Tuesday this time. The mercury had already reached 33 ° C by 12.30 p.m. today and will continue to rise during the course of the day.

Bournemouth City Council warned as early as 10am that eight beaches on the Dorset coast were already classified as "avoid, social distancing impossible" – including Sandbanks, Mudeford, Highcliffe and Durley Chine. All parking spaces in Sandbanks were full and closed until 11am, while the police warned tourists of a "long queue" for the ferry.

In the report released today, the ONS said the percentage of people who tested positive for Covid-19 has decreased since the study began on April 26.

But it added: 'Modeling suggests it has increased since the lowest recorded estimate in late June. There is now evidence that this trend may have flattened out. & # 39;

One of the UK's top experts, Professor Carl Heneghan, warned this week not to read too much into rising infection data.

Professor Heneghan, director of the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine at Oxford University, said the rising infection rates were due to more people being tested and warned of inaccuracies in the data.

He said putting 4.5 million people in the northwest under strict new lockdown measures last week was a "hasty" decision as there is no concrete evidence that Covid-19 cases are actually increasing.

Professor Heneghan claims that the number of swab tests made available to the public through DIY kits in the mail and in transit centers has increased by up to 80 percent in some areas in the northwest, skewing the numbers.

Coronavirus cases continued to decline after some lockdown measures were eased, a large study found today.

123 Brits were diagnosed with the infection from a sample size of nearly 160,000 people between June 9 and July 8 – an incidence rate of 0.07 percent. That was almost half less than in May, when 159 out of 120,620 people tested positive (0.13 percent).

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said research showed we were able to keep infection rates down because some restrictions were lifted.

Non-essential stores were allowed to reopen on June 15, and ministers allowed single-person households to mingle with other homes for the first time since the lockdown was introduced on March 23.

However, the impact of the July 4th changes – when the two-meter social distancing rule was cut in half and pubs, restaurants and cinemas reopened – won't be felt until the next report from the Imperial College London team.

According to official government statistics, the cases seem to have slowly crept in since “Super Saturday”. Around 800 people contract the virus every day – after a four-month low of 546 on July 8.

The same study also found that more than eight in ten people who tested positive for coronavirus in June and July had no symptoms.

It is because the British were told to stay away from crowded beaches today, amid overcrowded fears of what may be the UK's hottest day, with the air in the Sahara reaching over 38C for the second time in a week.

Mercury is expected to hit at least 37 ° C (99 ° F) today in London and the South East, with a chance the 100 ° F (37.8 ° F) recorded at London's Heathrow Airport – the UK's third hottest day ever ° C) could be broken last Friday.

Beaches on the south coast were already overcrowded in the mornings, adding to fears by police and local authorities that tourists might ignore coronavirus social distancing rules and crowd onto crowded coastlines.

Temperatures that afternoon could even surpass the UK record of 38.7 ° C (101.7 ° F) set last July.

But unlike last Friday, when clouds and drizzle followed, the heat wave will be here until at least Tuesday this time. The mercury had already reached 33 ° C by 12.30 p.m. today and will continue to rise during the course of the day.

Bournemouth City Council warned as early as 10am that eight beaches on the Dorset coast were already classified as "avoid, social distancing impossible" – including Sandbanks, Mudeford, Highcliffe and Durley Chine.

All parking spaces in Sandbanks were full and closed until 11am, while the police warned tourists of a "long queue" for the ferry.

Visitors to the south west of England have been advised to avoid busy beaches. The RNLI said, "If you get to the beach and it's just too crowded, you should consider moving on and spending your day elsewhere."

As fears of a second wave mount across Europe, Chancellor Rishi Sunak warned the British today sharply, telling them that travel restrictions could be placed on any country in an instant.

He said the government will "not hesitate" to take action by imposing restrictions on flows from countries if necessary.

The intervention came under the claim that France would be "most likely" to be placed on the 14-day quarantine list after a dramatic increase in infections.

People enjoy the hot weather on Bournemouth beach in Dorset at 11.30am today, where it is full of sun seekers

People enjoy the hot weather on Bournemouth beach in Dorset at 11.30am today, where it is full of sun seekers

Dozens of day-trippers headed to Camber Sands beach in East Sussex at 10:30 a.m. today, where large crowds gathered

Dozens of day-trippers headed to Camber Sands beach in East Sussex at 10:30 a.m. today, where large crowds gathered

People enjoy the weather on Brighton Beach in East Sussex just after noon today as the British flock to the coast

People enjoy the weather on Brighton Beach in East Sussex just after noon today as the British flock to the coast

'If We Need To Take Action We Will Not Hesitated': Rishi Sunak Warns Travelers Of Fears France May Be The Next Vacation Destination To Face UK Curbs Due To Rising Coronavirus Cases

Rishi Sunak strongly warned the British today fearing France could be the next vacation destination to face coronavirus curbs.

In the midst of increasing cases on a large part of the continent, the Chancellor warned that travelers must be aware that the situation is being “constantly checked” and that there is a “risk” of disruption.

He said the government will "not hesitate" to take action by imposing restrictions on flows from countries if necessary.

The intervention came under the claim that France would be "most likely" to be placed on the 14-day quarantine list after a dramatic increase in infections.

The number of daily coronavirus cases in the country has increased in the past few days. 1,695 new infections were registered just yesterday to avoid a second wave of Covid-19. The seven-day moving average of confirmed cases doubled from under 10 per million residents on July 21 to 19.33 yesterday. In contrast, there are around 12 cases per million people in the UK.

Any move by the government could force the British to cancel or abandon their trips to avoid the two-week quarantine on their return.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced yesterday evening that the Bahamas, Andorra and Belgium would be removed from the UK's quarantine exemptions list with just over 24 hours notice.

In a round of interviews while visiting Scotland this morning, Mr Sunak said, "It is a difficult situation. What I can tell people is that we are in the middle of a global pandemic and that means that there is always danger There is a disruption to travel plans, people need to take that into account.

“It is the right thing for us to keep checking everything in order to speak to our scientists, our medical advisors.

“If we have to take action, as you saw overnight, we will not hesitate to do it. But in the meantime, people should just keep looking at the guide and taking everything into account. "

The number of daily coronavirus cases in the country has increased in the past few days. 1,695 new infections were registered just yesterday to avoid a second wave of Covid-19. The seven-day moving average of confirmed cases doubled from under 10 per million residents on July 21 to 19.33 yesterday. In contrast, there are around 12 cases per million people in the UK.

Any move by the government could force the British to cancel or abandon their trips to avoid the two-week quarantine on their return.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced yesterday evening that the Bahamas, Andorra and Belgium would be removed from the UK's quarantine exemptions list with just over 24 hours notice.

In a round of interviews while visiting Scotland this morning, Mr Sunak said, "It is a difficult situation. What I can tell people is that we are in the middle of a global pandemic and that means that there is always danger There is a disruption to travel plans, people need to take that into account.

“It is the right thing for us to keep checking everything in order to speak to our scientists, our medical advisors.

“If we have to take action, as you saw overnight, we will not hesitate to do it. But in the meantime, people should just keep looking at the guide and taking everything into account. "

Developments in France come after its scientific committee said earlier this week that the situation was under control but precarious. We could at any time immerse ourselves in a scenario that is less under control. & # 39;

It added: “The short term future of the pandemic is largely in the hands of the people. It is very likely that we will see a second wave of epidemics this fall or winter. & # 39;

The statement said the virus "has been more active lately and has lost more distancing and barrier measures" since France emerged from its strict two-month lockdown in May.

"The balance is fragile and we can always change course to a less controlled scenario such as Spain," it said.

Paul Charles, CEO of travel consultancy The PC Agency, said: & # 39; Unless France takes further significant steps to reduce its case numbers, it will most likely be added later next week as the surge in Westminster must be of concern.

"There are currently hundreds of thousands of British tourists in France, so the government must warn if it changes its advice later next week."

The surge in infections in France has been compounded by new coronavirus testing problems as dozen of laboratories have closed to allow staff to take summer vacation despite signs of a second wave.

Doctors have warned that the vacation crisis is only part of a wider web of flaws in French testing strategy, which the state virus advisory board described earlier this week as disorganized and "inadequate".

First, there is a lack of manpower to run the tests. If we don't ask all health workers to be available through mobilization, there simply won't be enough people, ”said emergency doctor Christophe Prudhomme at a hospital in Bobigny, Paris.

"And then it's a matter of organization," he said, urging regional health authorities to "organize tests so that citizens don't have to take their phones and try to call seven or eight labs to get an appointment." place next week. & # 39;

It is worrying news for the country where its hospitals almost drowned with Covid-19 patients in the first wave – also due to inadequate testing.

The country has already lost more than 30,300 lives to the pandemic and 1,695 new infections were recorded yesterday alone.

A government decision is expected to be announced within the next 24 hours after ministers consider the latest data as part of their weekly quarantine review.

In the meantime, the Bahamas, Andorra and Belgium will be removed from the UK quarantine exception list.

Mr Shapps said people coming to the UK from the three nations will need to be quarantined from 4 a.m. on Saturday.

In a tweet, he said, “Data shows we need to remove Andorra, Belgium and the Bahamas from our list of coronavirus travel corridors to keep infection rates down.

"If you come to the UK from these destinations after 4:00 on Saturday, you will have to self-isolate for 14 days."

The European Center for Disease Prevention and Control has designated all of Belgium as “Code Orange” for the new coronavirus, which means that the number of cases per 100,000 population is 20 or more for two weeks.

Separately, Malaysia and Brunei have been added to the UK's safety list. In Wales, the restrictions will take effect from midnight on August 6th. Belgium has seen a steady increase in cases over the past few weeks, rising to 27.8 new cases per 100,000 people.

This beats the UK's recent rate of 8.4 per 100,000, and is above the Spanish level of 27.4 at the time the UK put travel restrictions there.

Belgian Prime Minister Sophie Wilmes was forced to halt the country's Covid-19 exit plan last week by imposing drastic new social distancing measures to avoid a new national lockdown.

Contacts outside of each household were restricted to the same five people for a month to help contain the spread of the virus.

In Andorra, the number of new cases per week has quintupled since mid-July, while in the Bahamas the weekly case rate was 78.6 last week, down from 3.1 in the middle of last month.

Countries follow Spain – which was quarantined two weeks ago and ruining millions of vacation plans – and Luxembourg, which was added last week.

The UK government has been under pressure to introduce airport coronavirus testing for arrivals.

Ministers are considering whether people coming to the UK from high-risk countries like the US and Spain could be subjected to testing to reduce the number of days they have to be quarantined.

And the head of Heathrow Airport has proposed a double test system that will test passengers again at their point of entry and five to eight days later.

If both tests were given the all-clear, they would no longer have to stay at home for 14 days and could return to normal life.

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