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Only FOUR hospitals are busier than last winter, data shows


Number 10 was accused today of running a "brainwashing PR campaign" after MailOnline's analysis of the official data found that only four NHS trusts in England are currently busier than they were last year – despite warnings it would Healthcare without the revised coronavirus paralyzed three-stage lockdown system.

Michael Gove sparked anger over the weekend claiming that without the government's new government restrictions from Covid-19, any hospital in England would be "physically overwhelmed" as he tried to convince MPs and the public to pull the brutal curbs To support.

The numbers from NHS England paint a completely different picture, however: there are thousands more hospital beds available this year than last winter. For the week ending November 22, an average of 77,942 of 88,903 (87.7 percent) available beds across the country were occupied. This is the most recent snapshot. This number doesn't take into account shift capacity in mothballed nightingales or the thousands of beds commanded by the private sector.

For comparison: During the seven-day period that ended on December 8, 2019 – that is the most comparable data available for last winter – the occupancy rate averaged 94.9 percent when around 91,733 of all 96,675 available beds were full .

Only four trusts – the Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust (FT), University College London Hospitals FT, Calderdale and Huddersfield FT, and Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh FT – are busier today than they were a year ago.

In Cambridge, an average of 769 of 823 beds (93.4 percent) were full for the week ended November 22, compared with 883 of 956 (92.5 percent) last winter. Calderdale and Huddersfield were 93.3 percent busy last week. 499 of 535 beds were occupied, slightly more than 92 percent last December, when 596 of 648 beds were used.

The Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust is almost fully occupied with 98.7 percent of the 335 beds. However, this number is still only slightly above the 96 percent of the previous year. While University College London was 89.2 percent full last December, compared to 93 percent last week.

Dr. Karol Sikora, consultant oncologist and professor of medicine at the University of Buckingham, said Downing Street was running a public relations campaign to brainwash "data that doesn't stack". He told MailOnline: "We've been going back from how it started in March and (the government) has been claiming we need the measures to protect the NHS. The data you showed me proves it doesn't need to be protected. It does indeed handle Covid very well.

“The data shows that hospitals are not running at full capacity and still have some spare beds for Covid if necessary. The public is misled, the data doesn't pile up. Fear and scaremongering are used to keep people out of the hospital. & # 39;

It comes when Laurence Fox sparked anger today after calling the NHS "not fit for purpose" and saying the health care staff were "not my savior". The actor said, “If you can't handle a virus with a 99.9 percent survival rate, you are not fit for purpose. You don't need protection, my older relatives do. & # 39;

It is true that almost a third of UK hospitals are currently seeing more coronavirus patients than they were at the height of the crisis in April.

Overall, there are still 4,000 fewer people with the disease in English hospitals than on the darkest days in mid-April. By comparison, 18,970 Covid-19 patients were treated on April 12 – the busiest day since the pandemic began, compared with an average of 14,343 in the week ending November 22.

For the week ending November 22, an average of 77,942 of 88,903 (87.7 percent) available beds across the country were occupied. This is the most recent snapshot. For comparison: During the seven-day period that ended on December 8, 2019 – that is the most comparable data available for last winter – the occupancy rate averaged 94.9 percent when around 91,733 of all 96,675 available beds were full

Only four trusts – the Cambridge University Hospitals Foundation Trust (FT), University College London Hospitals FT, Calderdale and Huddersfield FT, and Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh FT – are busier today than they were a year ago

Of the trusts that are busiest this year, only Wrightington, Wigan and Leigh see more patients overall than last winter

It is true that almost a third of UK hospitals are currently seeing more coronavirus patients than they were at the height of the crisis in April. Overall, there are still 4,000 fewer people with the disease in English hospitals than on the darkest days in mid-April

It is true that almost a third of UK hospitals are currently seeing more coronavirus patients than they were at the height of the crisis in April. Overall, there are still 4,000 fewer people with the disease in English hospitals than on the darkest days in mid-April

In other coronavirus developments:

  • The UK recorded just 12,330 Covid-19 infections today, 20 percent fewer than last week at that time, and 205 Covid deaths.
  • Boris Johnson insisted he "understand" the extent of the Tory's anger at the new levels of Covid when he eventually released an impact assessment of the measures – but the document claimed it was impossible to gauge economic success.
  • Bars, cinemas and football stadiums could turn away Britons who have not been vaccinated against Covid, the British vaccination minister claimed.
  • Welsh pubs will have to close at 6 p.m. and will be banned from selling alcoholic drinks as of Friday as the country has been under a new lockdown just weeks after the last one ended.
  • Some high street stores will be open 24/7 in December to offset the economic success of the new £ 900 million per day tier restrictions.
  • Moderna today filed its Covid vaccine for emergency approval in the US and Europe after final analysis of its last study showed the sting was 94.1 percent effective at preventing infection.

An NHS spokesperson told MailOnline: “The pandemic has changed the way the NHS provides care. Hospitals need to divide services into Covid and non-Covid zones to protect patients in ways that were unnecessary less than a year ago, i.e. some beds cannot be used due to improved infection prevention and control measures .

Laurence Fox describes the health service as ineffective if it "cannot handle viruses with a survival rate of 99.9%".

Actor Laurence Fox is currently turning to a career in politics

Actor Laurence Fox is currently turning to a career in politics

Laurence Fox sparked anger today after calling the NHS "not fit for purpose" and saying that health care workers "are not my saviors".

The actor, who is currently attempting a career in politics, has faced a backlash after announcing that he had a "large group" for lunch – despite England's lockdown rules, which prohibited people from being inside or outside to meet in groups of more than six people.

After enjoying the weekend get-together, Fox tweeted, “The @nhs is not my church and my salvation. The staff are not my saviors.

“If you can't handle a virus with a 99.9% survival rate, you are not fit for any purpose. You don't need protection, my older relatives do. I also love your emergency care and will continue to pay for it. Currently. & # 39;

His message followed an earlier tweet: “We just had a large group out for lunch and we hugged and ate and talked and made the world right. It was lovely. You will never take that away from people. Stay outside. Protect your rights … if that @nhs isn't suitable for the purpose. Compliance is violence. & # 39;

The tweets sparked a heated debate online. Actor Mark Dexter, who has appeared on Doctor Who and The Crown, tweeted, "I didn't mean to get into the Laurence Fox stuff, but now he's bragging about putting my family at risk. I think why not."

"I was against him once for a US television role – to play the son of James Fox's character." Like Laurence's real father. I did it. & # 39;

Piers Morgan also slammed Fox because of his Covid-19 tweets amid the nationwide four-week embargo in England.

"This means that trying to compare current occupancy numbers to pre-pandemic occupancy numbers is like comparing apples and pears and not reflecting the very real pressures that hospitals are seeing due to the increasing number of patients with Covid-19, which is why this is so what is important is that we all continue to follow government guidelines and help stop the virus from spreading. & # 39;

MailOnline has asked the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs and the cabinet for comments.

Dr. Describing Mr Gove's claims over the weekend as "bizarre", Sikora added, "The way out of this chaos is for politicians to be honest and let people make their own decisions about the epidemic. Ministers need to be more confident in the public have. If you trust them, they will repay your trust. & # 39;

Professor Carl Heneghan, an epidemiologist and expert in evidence-based medicine at Oxford University, said the analysis did not surprise him. He added, “I think that's an incredibly important point, the data doesn't add up. I think it is imperative that the people we are voting for now be informed.

"It is now clear that they (ministers) should have a combined information pack that combines case data with NHS data, and that this should be made available to them weekly in digestible format so that they can inform their decisions."

Professor Heneghan criticized the government for spreading the narrative that the NHS was marginalized despite publicly available data showing the opposite, but added, "How is a MP if you are not like me with the Messing around with data? wanted to know how to access NHS record data? & # 39;

Professor Heneghan said: "There is a tendency to believe that more people in the hospital with Covid are a bad thing. I tend to disagree – for one thing, the threshold for admission with the virus is lower."

At the height of the crisis in the spring, doctors had to be selective about who to admit to hospital as there were so many seriously ill patients and the NHS lacked equipment such as ventilators and personal protective equipment.

However, since more than 60,000 elderly and vulnerable people have already been killed by the virus, fewer patients are coming in with serious illness, which means hospitals have more options to admit people with moderate illness. Professor Heneghan added, “There are reasons why it may look worse this time, but it is not. You need to consider these other features. & # 39;

The analysis of the NHS numbers is not an exact comparison on a like-for-like basis as it compares November this year with December last year. However, the week ending December 8th is the earliest snapshot NHS England released last winter.

The number of beds available to the NHS this year is fewer than last year as strict social distancing rules for wards and hospitals struggle with a higher percentage of employees on sick leave. These two factors also theoretically make it easier for hospitals to overflow.

It is also known that many trusts had to start abandoning routine operations to make room for the influx of Covid during the second wave. This could lower the occupancy rate and make the NHS appear less busy than it would otherwise have been if the operations had been performed.

Meanwhile, angry Tory rebels have called on Mr Gove to release the evidence underlying his claim that without the government's new tiered system of restrictions, the NHS would be "overwhelmed" by the coronavirus.

The Minister for the Cabinet Office made the claim on Saturday as he tried to quell a Conservative uprising and convince MPs to support the curbs when they are put to the vote on Tuesday.

However, leading Tories reacted with anger at the proposal when they urged the government to stick to "hard evidence, not exaggeration".

Mark Harper, the Tory MPs Covid Recovery Group chairman who opposes the measures, told Mr Gove, "If he really thinks hospitals are overwhelmed, then show us the modeling" that proves it.

The government has been harshly criticized for using the darkest models of its scientists to create terrifying charts and to roll them out at official press conferences.

NHS WORKER SHARES VIDEO OF & # 39; EMPTY & # 39; LONDON A & E.

Louise Hampton, a 111-year-old former worker, has claimed NHS staff who remain silent about the coronavirus are "part of the problem".

Louise Hampton, a 111-year-old former worker, has claimed NHS staff who remain silent about the coronavirus are "part of the problem".

An NHS staff member who went viral after sharing an impromptu Facebook Live in August declaring the Covid-19 pandemic "a lot of shit" has shared new footage from "empty" London A&E departments .

Louise Hampton, 37, who was working as the NHS 111 health advisor for Care UK in Southall, west London at the time, was furious in the original five-minute slogan shot in the driver's seat of her car: "Apparently , I worked really hard during COVID … Do I have b ***** ks? & # 39;

The single mother waved the certificate she received for all of her hard work during the pandemic: “That's why this is a certificate for b ***** ks. Our service was dead! I did everything. & # 39;

In a new video, the former NHS worker filmed herself visiting the NHS A&E departments in London, claiming they were empty on a Friday night because people were "afraid to go to hospitals".

And in her first interview, she exclusively tells FEMAIL that doctors and nurses are making the crisis worse by “keeping quiet” and that the government has just “renamed the flu”.

The vast majority of England – 99 percent – is said to be ranked at level two or three, with only the Isle of Wight, Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly falling into the easiest group.

Up to 100 Tory MPs are said to be considering rebelling for tomorrow's crunch vote because they believe the government has not yet advocated the draconian measures.

Labor is expected to support the measures, which means they will almost certainly be agreed in the House of Commons. But a Tory rebellion of the magnitude predicted would do massive damage to Boris Johnson's authority.

Mr Gove said in an article for The Times on Saturday that MPs must "take responsibility for tough decisions" to contain the spread of Covid-19 as he said any hospital in England could get into trouble if the levels rise not be rolled out.

He said: “Covid does not respect constituency boundaries and the difficulties we are facing now are unfortunately necessary to protect each and every one of us no matter where we live.

"In any analysis of this government's or any government's approach, the cost of lockdowns and restrictions cannot be offset against the status quo ante, only against the cost of inaction or inadequate action and the overpowering of the NHS."

He added, “The truth, uncomfortable as it is, sets you free. And these new levels, along with the wider use of mass testing, can prevent our NHS from being overwhelmed by the time the vaccines arrive. & # 39;

It comes after actor Laurence Fox called the NHS "not fit for purpose" and said that health care workers "are not my saviors".

The actor, who is currently attempting a career in politics, has faced a backlash after announcing that he had a "large group" for lunch – despite current lockdown rules in England that prohibit people from entering Meet indoors or outdoors in groups of more than six people.

After enjoying a weekend get-together, Fox tweeted, “The NHS is not my church and my salvation. The staff are not my saviors. “If you cannot handle a virus with a 99.9 percent survival rate, you are not fit for any purpose. You don't need protection, my older relatives do. I also love your emergency care and will continue to pay for it. Currently. & # 39;

His message followed an earlier tweet: “We just had a large group out for lunch and we hugged and ate and talked and made the world right. It was lovely. You will never take that away from people. Stay outside. Protect your rights … when the NHS isn't up for the purpose. Compliance is violence. & # 39;

The tweets sparked a heated debate online. Actor Mark Dexter, who has appeared on Doctor Who and The Crown, tweeted, "I didn't mean to get into the Laurence Fox stuff, but now he's bragging about putting my family at risk. I think why not."

"I was against him once for a US television role – to play the son of James Fox's character." Like Laurence's real father. I did it. & # 39;

Piers Morgan also slammed Fox because of his Covid-19 tweets amid the nationwide four-week embargo in England. During Good Morning Britain on Monday, Piers hit Laurence and told him the pandemic was not about you.

He said: “He made a lot of good comments about the wokies, I have sympathy for him. But his behavior during the pandemic has become reckless. (He reads the tweet).

“Laurence, why don't you just shut up? Seriously? Think of all the people who cannot see all of their loved ones in nursing homes because they obey the rules.

“Not because of their desire to carry on normally, but because they think of other people. I thought this tweet was just ridiculous. It is for the weakest in our society to prevent them from being killed. It's not about you. & # 39;

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