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Officers could use ROADBLOCKS to monitor Leicester's closure


Roadblocks could be imposed to enforce the country's first local closure.

Police said they were considering "all options" in Leicester as cases in the city continued to increase.

Walkers Chips confirmed yesterday that 28 of its employees in their Leicester plant, which employs more than 1,400 people, had tested positive for Covid-19.

However, the manufacturer denied that the increase in cases in the city was triggered by the factory outbreak, and said some employees who had tested positive had already returned to work.

It came out as a video that showed hundreds of people participating in a community cricket match in a district of Leicester most affected by the resurgent corona virus.

The organized game, in which two local teams fought for a trophy, was followed by a large crowd that apparently did not follow any rules for social distance.

All non-essential businesses were closed in Leicester, where more than 800 cases have been registered since mid-June. Last week, the area accounted for 10 percent of all positive corona virus tests.

Leicestershire chief of police Simon Cole today refused to rule out the use of roadblocks to prevent people from leaving the cordoned-off area.

Roadblocks could be imposed to enforce the country's first local closures (Image: Veronica Cayless, 77, who lives alongside Bowhill Grove, Leicester and is free of closures).

Spectators gathered in a park in Spinney Hills, Leicester to watch a game of cricket

Spectators gathered in a park in Spinney Hills, Leicester to watch a game of cricket

He said, "We are considering all of our options, but we hope common sense will prevail. Most people have followed the previous iterations of the lock here. & # 39;

Problems have occurred in which the restricted area has divided the streets in two and separated neighbors who were subject to the same restrictions until this week.

Mr. Cole said: “The city boundary clearly didn't make any sense due to the development of housing in the last century.

"People are asked to stay at home … (and) only travel when absolutely necessary."

He added: “People have to choose personal risk – maybe you really want a beer this Saturday. We will be out there … advising people, we will talk to people who feel like they need to be on the move – but we have really reached a point where this is only an essential journey.

“If you have to travel to work, do it. If you need to travel for medication or food, do it. But otherwise we stay at home and watch Leicester City on TV. «

Pub owners in Nottingham will ask customers to provide tax certificates to prove that they are not from Leicester as bars outside of the restricted area have been instructed to prepare for “Super Saturday”.

Police have advised landlords across the city, 30 miles north of Leicester, to prepare for a rush of cordoned-off customers when the premises reopen this weekend.

People ignored the ban rules while enjoying a cricket game on Sunday afternoon

People ignored the ban rules while enjoying a cricket game on Sunday afternoon

The Leicestershire police were on site after receiving reports from members of the public

The Leicestershire police were on site after receiving reports from members of the public

The suspension prompted the Vice Chancellor of Leicester University, Professor Nishan Canagarajah, to ask potential students not to postpone their studies until the following autumn. He said the students shouldn't hurry to make a decision.

Walkers said: “We have seen an increase in the number of confirmed cases reflecting the situation in the local community.

"We are in contact with local health and government agencies and believe that we have taken the right measures to protect our employees."

Meanwhile, concerns about a "leper" effect have emerged after tourist destinations have announced they will turn away visitors from the region.

The Pentewan Sands holiday park near St. Austell, Cornwall, said on Facebook that it was no longer open to visitors from Leicester.

There were also concerns about travel destinations near Leicester. Health officials in Skegness said they were concerned about the prospect that visitors could travel from an area with a higher infection rate than ours.

Today's video shows hundreds of people who took part in a community cricket match in a district of Leicester most affected by the localized coronavirus outbreak.

The game, in which two local teams fought for a trophy, was followed by a large crowd that apparently did not respect the rules of social distance.

The Sunday night game was within sight of a government Covid 19 testing center and local police station just a few days before the government introduced stricter blackout rules to curb the spread of the virus in the city of East Midlands.

The neighbors were horrified by the spectacle, which included referees, goal scorers and a scoreboard, as well as a large, cheering crowd. However, the games were common every weekend.

Some participants in the game thought that the blocking rules had been lifted

Some participants in the game thought that the blocking rules had been lifted

Andy Oates, 56, who lives near the park, received a video and posted it on social media. He said: "It is difficult to believe that it is possible. There is a police station less than 100 meters away. What's happening?

"You would think that there is no lock. It's incredible. Life just goes on like this. Nobody gives two screams. That's why the virus spreads, ”said the bathroom fitter.

"I have children and grandchildren. It really worries me. It's not a nice position. It is disgusting. & # 39;

I am a locked inner! City street divided by border

It's like Leicester's answer to the Berlin Wall.

While some residents of a street in the city are closed again, their neighbors enjoy the relative freedom.

Bowhill Grove was split in half by the city's new restricted area, making some unfortunate people more restricted, while others can happily walk around the corner this weekend if the measures are eased.

Pictured: The border on Telford Way

Pictured: The border on Telford Way

51-year-old Paula Meadows, who was on the wrong side of the border when Monday's second blockade was introduced, said: “The government doesn't know what it is doing. Where they drew the line is just stupid.

& # 39; It plays with numbers. How can it start on one side of the street and not on the other? If we're locked, it should be the whole place. How are you going to monitor it?

“When the pub around the corner opens, there is an open pub that is within walking distance and where you can get a beer. What is preventing people from leaving? & # 39;

42-year-old neighbor Kay Patel lives in the same 550-meter-long street – but outside the restricted area.

She told the BBC: "This road is not a clear boundary. We are no longer blocked, but not beyond the bus stop. People just go out of the restricted area. Signs and barriers are needed. & # 39;

A Leicestershire County Council spokesman said the limit was set very quickly, adding that it was "an inaccurate science."

The game took place before the last restrictions imposed on Leicester, but the assembly was still violating the rules at the time.

According to government guidelines, people "cannot gather outdoors in a group of more than six people (except with members of your own household or a support bubble)".

However, a number of people MailOnline spoke to in the region felt that the restrictions on lifting have been lifted, suggesting that the government's message of social distancing may not reach all members of the community.

A resident who lives near the park, a 30-year-old mother of three, said: “It is my concern that this helps spread the virus. It's like nobody respects the lock. It looks like they don't care. & # 39;

The game was played in an extensive downtown park in the Spinney Hills in Leicester. According to the city council, the Spinney Hills district had the fourth highest number of infections among boroughs by June 23, the most recent available.

A 40-year-old taxi driver who lives near the park with his wife (46) said the family had avoided using the open space on their doorstep for four months to protect their disabled daughter, who is vulnerable to Infections.

"We were surprised to see so many people," he said. & # 39; They were two rival teams playing against each other. It's an annual thing that is usually great, but not currently. & # 39;

Yunus Patel's house (57) (pictured) overlooks the park and he saw the game. He said: & # 39; The virus is a danger. The police station is next to the park. The police see everything, but they don't care. & # 39;

And the neighbors said that the games continued throughout the curfew and usually took place on the morning of the weekend, sometimes very early. Residents wondered if this behavior contributed to the spread of Covid in Leicester.

"We saw a game that started between 30 players at 4.30am," said Yunus Umarji, 37. "There was never really a ban in Leicester."

Police in Leicestershire said the officers participated in the game.

In a statement, the squad said: & # 39; We are aware that a video of a cricket game at Spinney Hill Park has been released on social media.

After receiving a report on Sunday, officials went to the scene to help people get ahead.

& # 39; Routine patrols in the region have been strengthened based on reports from the community.

We will continue to ensure adequate policing in accordance with relevant legislation to ensure people's safety. Our approach has always been clear that we will use the four E's – Engage, Explain, Encourage and Enforce where necessary.

"The communities are encouraged to follow government guidelines."

Police in Leicestershire said anyone could call 101 to report possible violations of Covid 19 regulations.

Pub owners in Nottingham will require tax certificates from customers to prove that they are not from Leicester, as bars outside of the restricted city limits are instructed by the police to prepare for massacre on "Super Saturday".

Pub owners in Nottingham will ask guests to provide tax certificates to prove that they are not from Leicester, as bars outside the restricted area are asked to prepare for "Super Saturday".

Police have advised landlords across the city, 30 miles north of Leicester, to prepare for a rush of cordoned-off customers when the premises reopen this weekend.

Landlords and licensees in Nottingham attended a zoom meeting this afternoon, where the police and local authorities informed them about the situation.

Many of the city's pubs will now ask drinkers to prove with municipal taxes or electricity bills that they are from Nottingham before they can serve them a long-awaited beer.

Health minister Matt Hancock extended blocking measures in the city of East Midlands on Monday after a dramatic increase in coronavirus cases. Unnecessary shops were closed again and schools closed on Thursday.

Sheila Martin, who lives outside the restricted area, had been looking forward to opening her pub The Black Horse in Blaby on Saturday until Leicester's closure

Sheila Martin, who lives outside the restricted area, had been looking forward to opening her pub The Black Horse in Blaby on Saturday until Leicester's closure

Pictured: Adam Cropper, one of the owners of Ned Ludd in Nottingham, who is preparing for the reopening on July 4th

Pictured: Adam Cropper, one of the owners of Ned Ludd in Nottingham, who is preparing for the reopening on July 4th

The nationwide easing of restrictions this Saturday – including the reopening of pubs, hair salons and restaurants – will not extend to the city.

Nottingham venues have already canceled pre-booked pub sessions from Leicester visitors, and Castle Rock Brewery will require proof of address before guests are seated.

The required ID may include tax bills, utility bills, or student loan letters.

Lewis Townsend, marketing director at Castle Rock, told Nottingham Post: “In accordance with government guidelines, we will provide names and contact details on the door and customers may be required to provide ID and zip code information.

"We know that this can lead to disappointments, but we simply have to ensure the safety and well-being of our teams and customers."

Robert Glasby, manager of the Playhouse Bar and Kitchen in Nottingham, said: "I understand that these are drastic measures and in some cases will not be fair, but these are precautions that we must take to ensure the safety of our city and its people to guarantee."

Those who are within a government-drawn border in Leicestershire and are faced with extended blocking rules to limit the spread of the coronavirus following a recent increase in cases in the city.

Matt Keshavarz, manager of Nottingham's Oz Bar, is confident that if he opens his doors on Saturday for the first time in three months, he'll be able to spot bar tourists

Matt Keshavarz, manager of Nottingham's Oz Bar, is confident that if he opens his doors on Saturday for the first time in three months, he'll be able to spot bar tourists

Debbie Murray, 55, is desperately disappointed that she can't open the Star and Garter in Wigston, Leicester

Debbie Murray, 55, is desperately disappointed that she can't open the Star and Garter in Wigston, Leicester

Leicester has an infection rate of 135 per 100,000 people, which is three times higher than in the next higher region. Hospital admissions are also far above the norm at six to ten per day.

Under the barrier, those living in the area cannot make unnecessary trips, and pubs remain closed, which fears that a large number of residents will drive 30 miles to Nottingham for a drink.

"The police have told us they are preventing large groups from traveling and they have spoken to bus companies," said Gavin Morrison of Magpie Brewery, who runs the Crafty Crow in Nottingham.

"They told us we should set up booking systems that could help identify people from Leicester."

However, some landlords are not convinced that they can sort out their neighbors' drinkers in the East Midlands.

"The police said it was difficult because you can see their zip code on their driver's license, but they can't see if they actually live in the restricted area," said Adam Cropper, one of the owners of Ned Ludd.

"You cannot zoom in on the map of the restricted area and check the zip code. It is therefore impossible for me to monitor the police."

Pictured: Ms. Martin has prepared her pub with tape over seats and social distance signs

Pictured: Ms. Martin has prepared her pub with tape over seats and social distance signs

The data show how the Coronavirus outbreak in Leicester has increased over time. The UK figures only include first pillar swab tests which, according to official sources, are only given to patients with medical needs or key personnel

The data show how the Coronavirus outbreak in Leicester has increased over time. The UK figures only include first pillar swab tests which, according to official sources, are only given to patients with medical needs or key personnel

According to government regulations, pubs are expected to write down the details of the drinkers so that they can be traced in the event of a Covid 19 outbreak related to a building.

However, a driver's license may not be displayed. If proof of identity is requested and given as a passport, the address of the person is not checked, only the place of birth.

"You could give us any name or address," added Mr. Cropper.

A landlord in another downtown bar who didn't want to be named was more abrupt. "People are not being honest," he said. "Everyone tells lies".

But Matt Keshavarz, manager of Nottingham's Oz Bar, is confident that if he opens his doors on Saturday for the first time in three months, he'll be able to spot bar tourists.

"People from Leicester won't come in," he said. “It's nothing against the people in Leicester, it only protects our customers and employees.

The Oz Bar is fully booked on Saturday and expects 170 customers, compared to the usual 520.

A person walks past a closed pub in Leicester after the onset of coronavirus disease

A person walks past a closed pub in Leicester after the onset of coronavirus disease

Health minister Matt Hancock extended blocking measures in the city of East Midlands (pictured) on Monday after a dramatic increase in coronavirus cases

Health minister Matt Hancock extended blocking measures in the city of East Midlands (pictured) on Monday after a dramatic increase in coronavirus cases

The pub asked for postcodes and will request a driver's license at the door upon arrival of the booked guests. However, Mr. Keshavarz accepts that some people may use a passport.

& # 39; There are other cases of coronavirus in Leicester and they have decided to remain banned. My message would be to follow the guidelines. Stay home and stay safe.

"There is a high risk that people will come from Leicester, but the police have announced that they will try to monitor it."

Sheila Martin had been looking forward to opening her The Black Horse pub in Blaby on Saturday until Leicester's ban.

As the popular landlord is 50 meters outside the restricted area, she pushes ahead with her plans, but now she is nervous and feared to be overwhelmed by residents from restricted areas who are desperately looking for a beer.

"I'm very concerned," said 56-year-old Sheila, who has been running the community bar for 18 years.

As she was preparing to cover her 1959 premises with black and yellow warning tape to indicate social distance, Ms. Martin told MailOnline: “No one else will open in Blaby, and I think there will be an insane rush from everywhere give . That's why I only have regular guests. I will be at the door. & # 39;

Leicester has an infection rate of 135 per 100,000 people, which is three times higher than in the next higher region

Leicester has an infection rate of 135 per 100,000 people, which is three times higher than in the next higher region

Hospital admissions are also well above the norm at six to ten per day

Hospital admissions are also well above the norm at six to ten per day

As a precaution, pedestrians wear masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus in North Evington, Leicester

As a precaution, pedestrians wear masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus in North Evington, Leicester

On a busy Saturday night, Ms. Martin could serve 200 customers, but this weekend she's limited to just 60, who will be accommodated in the rear bar for a one-way system to work and in the fenced off parking lot for table insertion.

Ms. Martin is ready to ask for driver's licenses to check postcodes, but most lucky ones who get access simply know them by sight.

"Other nearby pubs will remain closed until the city reopens," said Ms. Martin, whose regular guests have asked that after three months of thirsty waiting, they finally open the doors.

"Judging by my Facebook people, they're ready for a drink," said Sheila, who lost £ 120,000 in revenue during the Trust Inns Pub lockout.

"We said that we will open at 12 noon on Saturday and most people replied that they will be camping outside."

A few miles down in Wigston, another landlady, Debbie Murray, 55, is desperately disappointed that she can't open the Star and Garter.

The traditional Everards pub, which was once an old coach house and dates from 1879, is only a few meters inside the restricted area and must therefore remain closed.

"I put so much into the preparation, I was excited and I just finished everything, and then I was told there was another two-week ban. Well, I just burst into tears," said Ms. Murray, with her Husband runs the pub, Darren, 57.

The inn with several rooms can accommodate around 200 people when it is full. However, capacity will be halved when Star and Garter finally opens.

Before the new announcement of the closure, many preparations were made, with plexiglass screens at the bar and new outdoor furniture worth several thousand pounds.

"The brewery was fantastic," said Ms. Murray, who estimates that £ 180,000 in revenue was lost during the three-month closure. "You really supported us."

Police say they will stop drivers from leaving Leicester and that Flouter will face fines of £ 100 after the reveler tried to rent a bus to take friends from the city affected by COVID for an evening in Nottingham when the pubs open on Saturday

Police have agreed to stop and punish drivers who attempt to flee Leicester to drink or shop after the city has been closed again after an increase in Covid 19 cases in the city.

The officers will randomly test vehicles leaving Leicester's restricted area and turn them around when their journey is not essential. This became known today due to confusion as some areas within the city limits are closed while the neighbors are not.

The Leicestershire police are also threatening to pay £ 100 fines as concerns grow that residents may flee to the district's open pubs, hair salons, or other attractions, while patrols will also disband city rallies after they ended in June have been partially blamed for an increase in coronavirus cases.

It came when the NHS set up another temporary coronavirus test center in northeast Leicester – the epicenter of the city's Covid 19 outbreak – and increased the total to five in the city.

Yesterday Colin Browning, a fan of Leicester City, sent a call to people to take him on a bus to Nottingham to spend a night in the pub for £ 15. It was sold out on Tuesday, but he reduced it to a minibus last night after admitting that it was "over the top".

It came after people booked minibuses and coaches to take them to nearby Nottingham and Derby to drink on "Super Saturday" this weekend – when the rest of England emerged from the closure on July 4th. Nottinghamshire's chief of police Craig Guildford says his officers are also ready to act if Leicester residents show up in Nottingham for shopping or going out while the UK traffic police is checking trains between the two cities.

Pictured: The restricted area in Leicester, where some Brits are locked while their neighbors are not

Colin Browning, a fan of Leicester City, tweeted a call to people to take him on a bus to Nottingham to spend a night in the pub for £ 15 yesterday

Colin Browning, a fan of Leicester City, tweeted a call to people to take him on a bus to Nottingham to spend a night in the pub for £ 15 yesterday

The patrols could also be stepped up in public spaces to enforce the guidelines, but roadblocks are considered excessive, the Times reported when the Leicestershire police criticized the "drip" of information from Whitehall to local authorities and Matt Hancock insisted Closing shops would be enforced by law, but there would be no travel ban.

Covid cases at Walkers

Walkers today confirmed 28 positive cases of Covid-19 in its crispy Leicester factory.

The company, which employs 1,400 people across the site in Beaumont Leys, said the number of confirmed cases increased steadily in June.

Walkers claimed that his track and trace procedure revealed that the virus was "not in our factory".

The company claims that the increase "coincides with the introduction and inclusion of tests" in Leicester.

Willy Bach, police and crime commissioner for Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland, criticized the blocking process. “A map of the (restricted) area was only made available to us long after the announcement. I have great sympathy with the agencies commissioned with the delivery. They needed clarity from the start and I am amazed that it is fed with drops throughout the day, ”he said.

Officials will stop cars, minibuses, and coaches and disband large groups after it became known that a large block party was held in Leicester last weekend.

Oxford University professor Peter Horby, chairman of the new and emerging Advisory Group on Respiratory Virus Threats (Nervtag), said the public should be prepared for other local coronavirus restrictions to return later in the year.

He told BBC Radio 4's Today program, "Unfortunately, I think we should. We have seen that the epidemic is at the center, which is often the case and is not the same in all places. And we have seen that London is unfortunately the leader in the UK and now Leicester is unfortunately the leader and we can expect more from it. I think there must be local responses to local outbreaks. & # 39;

Dr. Duncan Robertson, a data expert at the School of Business and Economics at Loughborough University, told MailOnline that Public Health England's statistics indicate a "group of outbreaks around Manchester", while Doncaster also saw an increase in cases and it in Kent, Wales, there are persistent outbreaks and Scotland is a cause for concern.

Health Minister Matt Hancock confirmed that the blockade measures in the city of East Midlands will be extended for at least two weeks after a dramatic increase in coronavirus cases. Shops that are not necessary will be closed again and schools will be closed from Thursday. According to government documents, it will not be reviewed until July 18.

Leicester City Council and Public Health England released a map on Tuesday detailing exactly which areas in Leicestershire to block. The border extends to Birstall in the north of the city and Wigston in the south.

Police are checking the cars in York on March 26. Officials will conduct similar controls to ensure that the locals obey the new location in Leicester

Police are checking the cars in York on March 26. Officials will conduct similar controls to ensure that the locals obey the new location in Leicester

Pictured: Where the border runs across Leicester at Bowhill Grove after Matt Hancock announced a local extension of the closure

Pictured: Where the border runs across Leicester at Bowhill Grove after Matt Hancock announced a local extension of the closure

But those who lived on a street in Scraptoft last night said they were "completely confused" by the government's blockade because half of the street is strictly blocked and others have the opportunity to enjoy the July 4 nationwide easing restrictions .

77-year-old Kathleen McDonagh, who lives a few meters within the Leicester restricted area with her 56-year-old daughter Mary, has to wait at least two weeks before enjoying relaxed Covid-19 measures and into the pub, hairdressing salons and the Pub can go to restaurants.

The couple must also wait before visiting their children and grandchildren, enjoying a cup of tea at The White Horse, or attending Mass in the nearby St. Joseph Catholic Church.

Meanwhile, 77-year-old Veronica Cayless, who lives in a house opposite the McDonaghs, is looking forward to starting her life with most of the British on the so-called "Super Saturday".

Her home is outside the extended cut-off limit announced on Monday amid an increase in the Covid 19 cases in Leicester. The city accounted for around 10 percent of all positive cases in the UK last week.

Leicester has an infection rate of 135 per 100,000 people, which is three times higher than in the next higher region. Hospital admissions are also far above the norm at six to ten per day.

The families both live on a quiet suburban street that consists of four-bedroom semi-detached houses and manicured lawns.

However, imposing a local blacklist means that some residents must remain isolated while others enjoy the same exemption from Saturday as the rest of the country.

Less than a mile from Ms. McDonagh and Ms. Cayless, neighbors that are both inside and outside the restricted area are separated by a bare wooden picket fence.

As Leicester is the first area in the UK to be subject to local blocking measures:

  • All nonessential deals are closed and the law must be enforced to support the new restrictions after more than 800 cases have been registered in Leicester since mid-June and the area accounted for around 10 percent of all positive tests in the UK last week;
  • The schools will be closed from Thursday and will not be opened again until the next semester, as there are fears that an unusually high incidence among children will drive the spread. They remain open to vulnerable children and descendants of key workers.
  • People are advised to avoid all travel to, from and within Leicester and to "stay at home as much as possible". However, there is currently no formal travel ban.
  • The loosening of the block in England on Saturday does not apply to Leicester, which means that pubs, restaurants, hairdressers and cinemas remain closed.
  • Unlike the rest of England, where the most clinically vulnerable can spend more time outdoors, city protection is not relaxed on July 6th.

Those on the divided street in Scraptoft shared their confusion at the invisible barrier last night – but insisted that following the blocking rules was the right thing to do.

Ms. McDonagh, who lives a few meters inside the border, said she was looking forward to seeing her grandson, whom she has not been able to visit since the March curfew.

"I was looking forward to that," she said. "I saw him every day. I really miss him. It's terrible. I miss not going to the stores. I like meeting my sister in town once a month and drinking a cup of tea, but I haven't seen her since March.

"It's my birthday in August and my son was going to invite us to a party, but I don't think that will happen now."

Kathleen McDonagh, 77, who lives with her daughter Mary (seen together), 56, inside the border at Scraptoft, has to wait at least two weeks before she can enjoy relaxed lockdowns and go to the pub, in hairdressing salons, restaurants next to the Rest of Britain

Kathleen McDonagh, 77, who lives with her daughter Mary (seen together), 56, inside the border at Scraptoft, has to wait at least two weeks before she can enjoy relaxed lockdowns and go to the pub, in hairdressing salons, restaurants next to the Rest of Britain

Lisa Jones (52), Shelly Evans (56) and Helen Bale (49) remain locked in Leicester, while their neighbors David Blohm (74) and Emil Gryglewski do not because the new border runs through their street

Lisa Jones (52), Shelly Evans (56) and Helen Bale (49) remain locked in Leicester, while their neighbors David Blohm (74) and Emil Gryglewski do not because the new border runs through their street

The Leicester barrier crosses Telford Way and Kinross Avenue, with neighbors separated by a wooden fence and now in completely different situations

The Leicester barrier crosses Telford Way and Kinross Avenue, with neighbors separated by a wooden fence and now in completely different situations

That evening, the Telford Way / Kinross Avenue border road was busy with children and neighbors outside their homes one summer evening, doing jobs, chatting, and riding bicycles

That evening, the Telford Way / Kinross Avenue border road was busy with children and neighbors outside their homes one summer evening, doing jobs, chatting, and riding bicycles

The R rates disappear from the discussion about the blockage in Leicester

Discussion of & # 39; R & # 39; rates disappeared amid the rise in coronavirus in Leicester – experts claim that the measurement will become less reliable if the cases fall.

The "R" – or reproductive rate – was used by the ministers to explain whether the UK coronavirus pandemic was increasing or retreating during the crisis.

The number, which is currently between 0.7 and 0.9 in the UK, indicates the average number of secondary infections caused by someone with Covid-19.

An "R" rate of less than one indicates a pandemic that is falling, while infections increase when they are above one.

The & # 39; R & # 39; value was barely mentioned in briefings amid the surge in coronavirus cases in Leicester, the Daily Telegraph reported, with Matt Hancock instead sharing a seven day infection rate.

He also mentioned daily hospitalizations in the region, which are currently between six and ten.

This obvious departure from the R rate could illustrate the growing discomfort in measurement among ministers.

In June, a senior government scientist gave the media a word of caution about the term, especially when it was used regionally.

He said the "R" rate had become less reliable as the number of new cases decreased.

Shortly afterwards, the government published "growth rates" in addition to these measures.

For daughter Mary, a freelance print designer who works from home, she also lacks the family – and the opportunity to go to church.

"We haven't been to the fair since March," she said. & # 39; we miss it. We're watching TV crowds, but it's not the same thing. We cannot receive a community. & # 39;

However, the couple is convinced that following blocking rules is the right thing to do.

Leicester has registered 944 positive Covid 19 cases within two weeks – almost a third of the 3,216 cases in the city since the pandemic started.

"We do everything we can to follow the rules and help the community," said Mary, who revealed that they didn't even see family members across the street, except for Zoom.

"We will never get out of the lockdown unless people just crawl under it and do it for everyone else."

Meanwhile, Ms. Cayless, who lives right across from the McDonaghs, is looking forward to visiting one of her sons, who lives in St. Albans, for the first time since Christmas.

& # 39; It's totally confusing for everyone. But I'm lucky. I'm looking forward to walking with my girlfriend, which I couldn't do there, ”she said.

Ms. Cayless added that she was not sure how to implement the extended ban. How can someone test where someone comes from when they cross the border?

Less than a mile away, residents inside and outside the restricted area near Thurncourt are only separated by a wooden picket fence.

On the one hand, 49-year-old Helen Bale said she was disappointed that she would have to wait longer to visit friends and family outside of Leicester, as those within the restricted area are restricted to essential trips.

"We wanted to visit my in-laws in Mablethorpe, Lincolnshire, but we can't go now," said the caregiver. "If I were stopped by the police, they would say you can't do it."

The confusion about what residents can and cannot do is widespread and extends to whether people can work and where to shop.

Ms. Bale lives in the restricted area, but works outside.

Matt Hancock announced that non-essential stores will close today and schools in Leicester will close Thursday

Matt Hancock announced that non-essential stores will close today and schools in Leicester will close Thursday

The streets of Leicester were almost empty this morning when residents responded to warnings of an increase in the corona virus

The streets of Leicester were almost empty this morning when residents responded to warnings of an increase in the corona virus

The market remained boarded up in Leicester today, and the blockage should be tightened again to combat the spread

The market remained boarded up in Leicester today, and the blockage should be tightened again to combat the spread

The Gallowtree Gate in Leicester today prepares as a local for the new closure after an increase in the corona virus

The Gallowtree Gate in Leicester today prepares as a local for the new closure after an increase in the corona virus

A resident is walking down a street in the North Evington area of ​​Leicester today, amid the renewed blockade

A resident is walking down a street in the North Evington area of ​​Leicester today, amid the renewed blockade

How a large BAME population, poverty and crowded households could have contributed to Leicester's rise in some cases

Government officials, local politicians and scientists disagree as to whether Leicester is experiencing a real increase in certain cases or whether better tests simply find more of them where it wasn't before.

It is also not clear whether there are any characteristics of Leicester that make it more likely that an increase will occur in certain cases, or whether accidental coincidences have led to the first “second wave” taking place there. Experts say that many of the risk factors in Leicester are the same in all major cities in England.

The city's mayor, Sir Peter Soulsby, said this morning on BBC Radio 4 that a report sent to him by the government actually confirms that it is very likely that the increase in the number of positives identified is due to increased testing, and that in fact, maybe nothing is of great importance in these results. & # 39;

The city's public health director, Ivan Browne, said: “Interestingly, (the increase in cases) it is very much the younger working age population and mostly the eastern part of our city. We have started to see this level through our test program.

“Young people work in many industries across the city. At this stage, we try to collect as much epidemiological information as we can to really try to understand and understand it. I don't think we see a single source or smoking gun at the moment. "

It was always likely that city overvoltages would occur first. There are more people who increase the risk, and these people are more likely to live in densely populated areas and come into contact with strangers on a regular basis.

Dr. Shaun Fitzgerald of Cambridge University said: “There will be differences in the ease with which people can maintain physical distance between densely populated areas and rural areas, so it is not surprising to me that we may see localized torches. Oops, which in turn have to be suppressed by delayed relaxation or temporary reintroduction of some restrictions on certain movements and activities. "

Leicester also has a high level of deprivation, which affects people's lives in a way that puts them at risk of getting the virus.

Dr. Simon Clarke, microbiologist at the University of Reading, told MailOnline: “In disadvantaged areas, people have to go to work more often, work less from home, and use public transport more. You cannot distance yourself from others. & # 39;

The city's Samworth Brothers sandwich factory reported over the weekend that it had diagnosed cases of Covid-19 among its employees.

Food processing factories pose a higher risk of transmission because the virus can survive longer in cold environments on hard surfaces and people's airways become more susceptible to infection.

Dr. Clarke added that the type of work people do could increase their risk.

"Blue collar cities are now at higher risk than places like London and Manchester that offer more financial services," he added.

»My boss called me and how do you feel? If I don't go in, I won't get paid. I just don't see how it will work, ”she said.

The 51-year-old neighbor Lisa Jones is also in the hotspot area Covid-19 and is still closed.

"I'm confused," said the dance school receptionist. 'May I be on the other side of this fence? Can I look for the bare minimum in local stores because the stores I use are just outside the restricted area? & # 39;

Ms. Jones' daughter had a baby shortly before the first lock-up period and the visits were just resumed. Now they have to end.

"I've only seen my grandson three or four times. And now I can't see him. It's devastating, ”she said.

On Tuesday, Grenzstrasse was full of children and neighbors outside their homes, doing jobs, chatting, and riding bicycles.

At one point on the road, however, a series of paving stones cross the asphalt. This is the route of an old railroad line that marks the boundary between the city of Leicester and the Market Harborough District, which is outside the restricted area.

The first house in the "free world" of the Market Harborough District belongs to David Blohm, 61, a retired builder.

"I don't understand it," he said to MailOnline. »Before my wife and I go out to dinner every two weeks, I look forward to doing it again. But I'm really worried about Covid. I think they unlocked it too soon. & # 39;

The 33-year-old Emil Gryglewski is happy to be on the right side of the stop line, but has understanding for his neighbors who do not.

"I understand that it's a difficult situation," he said. “I'm not sure it's a good way to stop the virus, but if you want to do it, there has to be a line somewhere. Unfortunately, this is the line. & # 39;

"I'm on the good side, they're on the dark side," joked the father. & # 39; I'm sorry for her. I know it's not fair. & # 39;

People elsewhere in the city seemed to agree to the closure on Tuesday, but were furious that it was necessary.

34-year-old accountant Vina Chaudhry told The Sun: “I am embarrassed to be born and live in Leicester and I hope the government is setting an example for our city. How can some people be so stupid and violate social distance rules that have been put in place to protect us? The city is full and we are now being punished for those idiots who don't follow the rules. & # 39;

46-year-old shop worker David Welby added: “Leicester did not stick to it and we are all now paying the price. But I have no problem keeping the lock and I'm glad it was extended. It is important. & # 39;

Speaking to the House of Commons last night, the Secretary of Health confirmed that unnecessary stores that opened on June 15th would close on Tuesday and the schools would close on Thursday when he put Leicester back in a locked state.

"After getting clinical advice on what to do and discussing it with the local team in Leicester and Leicestershire, we made some difficult but important decisions," he told MPs.

“We decided that from tomorrow on retail stores that are not absolutely necessary will have to be closed. As children are particularly affected by this outbreak, schools will have to be closed from Thursday to remain open to vulnerable children and children of critical workers during.

& # 39; Unfortunately, the clinical advice is that the July 6 easing of shielding measures cannot now take place in Leicester.

“We recommend people in Leicester to stay at home as much as possible, and we recommend not just traveling to, from and within Leicester. We will closely monitor compliance with social distance rules and take further steps if necessary. & # 39;

Royal Logistics Corp soldiers operate a mobile coronavirus test site at the Evington Leisure Center in Leicester today. One of them carries a box in which the drivers can use their Covid 19 swabs

Royal Logistics Corp soldiers operate a mobile coronavirus test site at the Evington Leisure Center in Leicester today. One of them carries a box in which the drivers can use their Covid 19 swabs

Military personnel set up a mobile coronavirus test site in Victoria Park, Leicester this morning

Military personnel set up a mobile coronavirus test site in Victoria Park, Leicester this morning

Mr. Hancock Said the reintroduced measures would continue to be reviewed and not held in place "longer than necessary," adding: "We will review whether we can publish one of the measures in two weeks.

"These Leicester-specific measures apply not only to the city of Leicester, but also to the surrounding metropolitan area, including for example Oadby, Birstall and Glenfield."

The health minister told Commons: “These measures are also deeply in the national interest, as it is in everyone's interest that we control the virus as locally as possible.

"Local measures like this are an important tool in our armory to fight outbreaks as we get the country back on its feet."

The Mayor of Leicester pleads for bailout funds to prevent companies from being crippled by new closures – it turns out he broke the restrictions on his girlfriend's visit

By Andy Dolan and Eleanor Hayward for the Daily Mail

There was an angry argument yesterday about the government's decision to block Leicester again.

The city's mayor called for a new bailout for companies in difficulty, and the police complained that they needed clear instructions on how to enforce restrictions.

The local police commissioner also criticized the "drip delivery" of information from Whitehall to local authorities.

It was annoying that a map showing which parts of the city and surrounding areas were affected by the blockage only appeared "long after" its announcement.

Niall Dickson, leader of the NHS confederation representing health care providers, said the ban was "confused" and warned: "What happened in Leicester could well be repeated elsewhere and we need a transparent approach to future local closures . " with clear accountability and public messages that are transparent, consistent and timely. & # 39;

The Mayor of Leicester, Sir Peter Soulsby (pictured), today called for a new bailout for companies in difficulty as the police complained about needing clear instructions on how to enforce restrictions

The Mayor of Leicester, Sir Peter Soulsby (pictured), today called for a new bailout for companies in difficulty as the police complained about needing clear instructions on how to enforce restrictions

The Mayor of Leicester, Sir Peter Soulsby, called for a bailout and said he was "very, very concerned" about the economic impact on the city, which has seen coronavirus cases increase in the past two weeks.

Non-essential stores that reopened two weeks ago should close yesterday, and schools will need to close for most students today.

The nationwide easing of restrictions this Saturday – including the reopening of pubs, hair salons and restaurants – will not extend to the city.

Residents were advised to stay at home as much as possible and were warned about all but essential travel. The exclusion zone comprises 147 schools controlled by the local authorities, which will have to close tomorrow except for the children of the key workers.

The zone also includes 239 restaurants, 196 hair salons or hairdressers and 182 pubs.

The Prime Minister's spokesman said that any employers in Leicester who have previously followed the vacation program could leave the workers on leave.

Yesterday, the shopping streets in the city center were still full of people.

The Gallowtree Gate in Leicester today prepares as a local for the new closure after an increase in the corona virus

The Gallowtree Gate in Leicester today prepares as a local for the new closure after an increase in the corona virus

Three women with masks stand in front of the test center. The city's mayor has said that pubs and restaurants may have to remain closed for two weeks due to an increase in some cases

Three women with masks stand in front of the test center. The city's mayor has said that pubs and restaurants may have to remain closed for two weeks due to an increase in some cases

People stand in line at a walk-in coronavirus test center in Leicester, led by a man in an orange hi-viz jacket with a mask

People stand in line at a walk-in coronavirus test center in Leicester, led by a man in an orange hi-viz jacket with a mask

Four military men stand in a mobile walk-in test center in Spinney Hill Park, a 34-hectare green space near the city center

Four military men stand in a mobile walk-in test center in Spinney Hill Park, a 34-hectare green space near the city center

The Leicestershire Police Federation said it was "impossible" to deal with the situation only based on "common sense" from the public.

Figures released yesterday by Leicester City Council show that 3,216 Covid-19 cases have been confirmed since the epidemic began, of which nearly a third – 944 – have been reported in the past two weeks.

The number of young people under the age of 18 diagnosed with the virus in Leicester has trebled from five to 15 percent in the past six weeks.

Dr. Jon Bennett of Glenfield Hospital in the city said employees first noticed an increase in coronavirus intakes three weekends ago. A quarter of the hospital's 80 Covid patients are now receiving oxygen support.

Leicestershire Police Federation's Dave Stokes said its members would assess the "practical aspects" of the new ban.

Mayor urged to stop violating rules

Pictured: Sir Peter Soulsby from Leicester

Pictured: Sir Peter Soulsby from Leicester

Leicester's mayor was faced with calls for resignation last night after the block was lifted.

Sir Peter Soulsby had to apologize when a newspaper revealed that he had broken the rules last month by visiting his partner before the restrictions were relaxed.

The former Labor MP, 71, admitted "an error of judgment" after staying at home with partner Lesley Summerland. The neighbors said he stayed with Miss Summerland (64) up to four times a week.

Sir Peter lives seven miles away. On May 1st, he tweeted: "Stay home safely."

Andrew Bridgen, MP from Leicestershire Tory said: “Now we have the situation where there is a huge increase in infections.

Sir Peter Soulsby should really step down. He ignored the lock rules himself … it's his fault. & # 39;

He added: "It is important that we get clarification from the government as soon as possible about what the public can and cannot do about this targeted ban. As we have seen in the past few weeks and months, it will be almost impossible for our colleagues to monitor the police if the government's guidance and news are confusing to the public.

"We are still awaiting confirmation of the exact roles our colleagues will play in monitoring and potentially enforcing this" Leicester Lockdown "and the laws our members should apply.

We have seen examples from across the country that "common sense" is impossible for the police. "

Health Minister Matt Hancock said earlier yesterday that additional tests in Leicester in the past ten days have shown an "unusually high incidence" of Covid-19 in children. He added: “Since children can transmit the disease – although it is very unlikely that they will develop the disease – we think it is safest to close schools.

Leicester is one of the most ethnically diverse places in Great Britain, where only 45 percent of the 330,000 inhabitants identify themselves as British. The city's infection rate is three times higher than in Bradford – the next worst affected area.

Doctors in Leicester said they saw an increase in cases for the first time three weeks ago – but only yesterday did the government release full data showing the extent of the outbreak.

The Ministry of Health said: "Public Health England started to exchange data with the local public health director as soon as an increase in cases was found."

ROBERT HARDMAN: The anger and despair of the Leicester residents who were sent to Coventry

So much for all of those fancy new Post-Covid Council signs that have been set up all over town and say, "Nice to see you back in Leicester."

As of this week, they might as well add, "But I'm afraid you were sent to Coventry."

Poor Leicester woke up yesterday to find that it is the first place in Britain to rewind the clock to the dark days in April after a localized second wave of coronaviruses.

The city famous for locating a king in a parking lot (Richard III is now in great shape in Leicester Cathedral) has become famous again because it was the first to return to Lockdown – although I have to say that I could find absolutely no evidence of enforcement here yesterday.

This is not a mere "tip". Leicester is a famous multicultural city that makes up only 0.6 percent of the population. Today it accounts for a whopping 10 percent of all cases of Covid-19 across the NHS England.

So the return to normality was postponed by at least a fortnight. While pubs, hotels and campsites are reopening this weekend in the rest of the country, Leicester has been instructed to go the other way. "Super Saturday" will be "Sober Saturday" in this part of the East Midlands, followed by "Sombre Sunday".

Poor Leicester woke up yesterday and found that it is the first place in the UK to rewind the clock to the dark days in April after a localized second wave of coronavirus, writes Robert Hardman (Image: Vicki Chapple about her market stall in Leicester).

Poor Leicester woke up yesterday and found that it is the first place in the UK to rewind the clock to the dark days in April after a localized second wave of coronavirus, writes Robert Hardman (Image: Vicki Chapple about her market stall in Leicester).

The city, which is famous for locating a king in a parking lot (Richard III is now in great shape in Leicester Cathedral), has become famous again because it was the first to return to the "lockout" .

The city, which is famous for locating a king in a parking lot (Richard III is now in great shape in Leicester Cathedral), has become famous again because it was the first to return to the "lockout" .

Schools have to close, along with non-essential businesses – many of which have just been reopened – and people are told to stay at home.

Pubs and restaurants that had prepared for the reopening are now reopening the shutters with tears.

Even worse is the fact that the residents are now branded as outcasts.

"We're like the leper in Leicester," sighs Tracy Jebbett, the local child protection officer, and calls BBC Radio Leicester to complain that her upcoming vacation in Cornwall has just been canceled.

The management of her campsite in St. Austell has just announced a ban on all bookings from Leicester and has told her that she cannot come.

There are now many stories on social media from boys and girls from Leicester who are planning to flee for one night on the tiles to neighboring Derby or Nottingham this weekend.

Anyone who is stupid or brave enough to leave town in a replica shirt from Leicester City or Leicester Tigers can count on exclusion – or worse.

Local authorities have announced that they will enforce restrictions, but nobody believes this for a moment. This is not Wuhan, and no one expects the proverbial "steel ring". But so far, Leicester doesn't even care about a Dettol ring.

It is of greater importance to the authorities why this particular city should suffer such an explosion of cases after a previously below-average infection rate.

However, the locals have many theories.

"Parts of the city are very crowded and some people have been careless because we sailed along the bottom of the infection league," said Manzoor Moghal, Muslim Forum think tank chairman, businessman and former chairman of race relations for the County Council committee.

“We have a lot of factories. Leicester is mostly Asian and many families have visited because they thought they were free of Covid. And now that has been found out. & # 39;

Pictured: Robert Hardman stands next to a sign that says "Nice to see you back in Leicester" while the city's closure is being extended

Pictured: Robert Hardman stands next to a sign that says "Nice to see you back in Leicester" while the city's closure is being extended

Despite widespread publicity about the virus's disproportionate impact on members of ethnic minorities and the number of households with several generations, Moghal says that the message has been lost to many.

„Das hätte die Menschen dazu bringen sollen, mehr Vorsichtsmaßnahmen zu treffen, und ältere Menschen, insbesondere diejenigen mit zugrunde liegenden Problemen, haben dies getan. Aber die Jungen nehmen eine andere Haltung ein. & # 39;

Die Rede von Minderheiten ist etwas mehrdeutig. Leicester ist stolz darauf, die vielfältigste Stadt Großbritanniens zu sein. Die Volkszählung von 2011 zeigte, dass die weiße Bevölkerung (50,6 Prozent) bald eine Minderheit sein würde, und nachfolgende Umfragen legen nahe, dass dies jetzt der Fall ist.

Einige der Gebiete mit den höchsten Infektionsraten sind jedoch Gebiete mit überwiegend asiatischer Herkunft im Osten der Stadt.

"Sie möchten sich nur nachts den örtlichen Park ansehen", sagt Amit Patel, 26, Chef von Milan Sweets in Evington, gleich neben der einst mächtigen kaiserlichen Schreibmaschinenfabrik. "Es gibt 500 Leute dort, die nachts Cricket schauen oder spielen."

Er hat erst kürzlich sein entzückendes Geschäft und das angrenzende Catering-Geschäft wiedereröffnet und gerade alle seine Mitarbeiter aus dem Urlaub zurückgebracht. Ursprünglich lag das Geschäft wieder bei 80 Prozent des Umsatzes vor der Pandemie, seit dieser Woche ist es jedoch eingebrochen. "Wir können es uns nicht leisten, wieder abzuschalten, besonders wenn es keine staatliche Unterstützung geben wird."

Erwartet er also, dass Leicester die erneute Sperrung beobachtet? 'Einige werden. Aber andere gehen direkt in die Kneipe in Market Harborough. «

Sie müssen sich nur von Hauptstraßen wie der East Park Road entfernen, um einige der Orte zu sehen, an denen laut den Einheimischen immer wieder neue Fälle des Virus auftreten. Es gibt zahlreiche kleine Fabriken, viele davon im Textilhandel, die vor kurzem wieder ihre Arbeit aufgenommen haben.

In überfüllten Werkstätten sind die Lichter an, die Maschinen schleifen ab und die Mitarbeiter arbeiten auf engstem Raum, ohne dass Anzeichen einer zusätzlichen Belüftung hinter dem ungeraden offenen Fenster erkennbar sind. Währenddessen sind die Dachrinnen draußen mit leeren Lachgas- (oder Lachgas-) Kanistern übersät, ein sicheres Zeichen für Partys auf der Straße.

"Inder sitzen gerne zusammen und teilen gemeinsam Essen", sagt Ali Siddiq, 56, und bietet mir ein Stück Naan-Brot an, während er auf einer Bank im Spinney Hill Park sitzt. »Sie haben Häuser in der Uppingham Road, in denen Schichtarbeiter 12 Jahre alt sind. Deshalb ist dieser Virus hier. Aber ich überlasse alles Gott. & # 39;

"Gehen Sie morgens auf die Straße und Sie werden sehen, wie all diese Arbeiter zu den Fabriken gehen", sagt der pensionierte Ratsbeamte Masoom Jeraj, 69, den ich mit seiner Frau Naznin im Spinney Hill Park treffe.

Im Spinney Hill Park in Leicester beobachten die Menschen soziale Distanzierung, da nicht unbedingt benötigte Geschäfte inmitten der örtlichen Pandemie geschlossen sind

Im Spinney Hill Park in Leicester beobachten die Menschen soziale Distanzierung, da nicht unbedingt benötigte Geschäfte inmitten der örtlichen Pandemie geschlossen sind

Aufgrund der Coronavirus-Pandemie blieben die Spielschaukeln für Kinder heute im Spinney Hill Park in Leicester gesperrt und angekettet

Aufgrund der Coronavirus-Pandemie blieben die Spielschaukeln für Kinder heute im Spinney Hill Park in Leicester gesperrt und angekettet

Das Paar ist hierher gekommen, um einen Coronavirus-Test im begehbaren Testzentrum zu erhalten, das von einem Team des 2. Bataillons The Royal Anglians geleitet wird. Alle scheinen erfreut zu sein, Sergeant Ashley Ward und sein Team zu sehen, von denen vier ohnehin einheimische Leicester-Jungs sind.

„Ich sehe das nicht als Aufgabe. Es ist nur etwas, was getan werden muss, und wir helfen Ihnen gerne weiter “, sagt Lance-Corporal Peter Arnold, 26, ehemals von der nahe gelegenen London Road.

Mir wird ein Nasen-Rachen-Tupfertest angeboten, der schnell und schmerzlos ist und dessen Ergebnis in 24 Stunden versprochen wird. Ich habe hier eine lange Warteschlange erwartet, aber es gibt überhaupt keine.

Nach einer Weile taucht der 44-jährige Kalpesh mit seiner Mutter und seiner fünfjährigen Tochter auf. Kalpesh ist seit mehreren Tagen arbeitslos und hat Kopfschmerzen. Sein Arzt sagte ihm, er solle einen Optiker aufsuchen – was er bereits getan hat -, aber jetzt hat er auch seinen Geruchssinn verloren. Seine Mutter habe einen Husten entwickelt.

Ich frage, wo er arbeitet. "Samworth Brothers", sagt er. Sofortige Alarmglocken. Die riesige Lebensmittelfabrik hat bereits Fälle in ihren Produktionslinien bestätigt. Kalpesh sagt, er habe geplant, am Morgen wieder zur Arbeit zu gehen. Also geht er? "Ich werde auf die Ergebnisse warten", sagt er. Ich wünsche ihm viel Glück.

Das Zentrum von Leicester ist bis auf den Marktplatz unheimlich leer. Eine begrenzte Anzahl von Ständen verkauft Obst und Gemüse an derselben Stelle, an der ein junger Gary Lineker am Stand seines Vaters gearbeitet hat.

Eine der ehemaligen Arbeiterinnen von Barry Lineker war Vicki Chapple, die seit langem ihren eigenen Stand betreibt. Sie ist während der Pandemie offen geblieben und hat ihrer Schwester, einer Intensivschwester, die mit dem Virus „sehr schlecht“ umgegangen ist, viel frisches Obst geschickt.

"Es macht mich wirklich traurig, weil es diese Stadt schlecht aussehen lässt", sagt sie mir. „Wir sind eine starke Stadt und werden zurückspringen. Aber ich mag diese Idee, die Stadt zu trennen, nicht. Wenn Sie eine Sperre haben, sollte es die ganze Grafschaft sein, sonst funktioniert es nicht. & # 39;

Außerhalb der Stadtgrenzen finde ich jedoch viel Solidarität. Der Bulls's Head in Whetstone sollte dieses Wochenende wiedereröffnet werden und konnte – wird aber immer noch nicht.

"Ich hatte heute Morgen eine große Bestellung von Bier gebucht, aber ich habe sie gerade storniert", sagt Vermieterin Jane Irwin. »Wir hatten uns wirklich darauf gefreut, unsere Stammgäste wiederzusehen.« Aber wir sind gerade erst hinter der roten Linie, sodass einige Leute sich Sorgen darüber gemacht haben könnten, dass andere Trinker die Grenze überschreiten. Also müssen wir nur warten. Wir haben dreieinhalb Monate gesperrt. Was sind noch zwei Wochen? & # 39;

Die Chefs der Kleiderfabrik in Leicester geloben, sich der Sperrung der Stadt zu widersetzen, weil sie es sich nicht leisten können, mehr Geld zu verlieren – auch wenn dies Leben gefährdet

Von Vivek Chaudhary für die MailOnline

Die Bekleidungshersteller in Leicester haben sich geschworen, sich der lokalen Coronavirus-Sperre der Stadt zu widersetzen, und protestiert, dass sie es sich nicht leisten können, mehr Geld zu verlieren, selbst wenn dies bedeutet, Leben in Gefahr zu bringen.

Dutzende kleiner bis mittelgroßer Einheiten, die Kleidung für führende High Street- und Online-Unternehmen herstellen, sind im Sperrgebiet der Stadt tätig, wo die Coronavirus-Raten am höchsten sind.

Alle waren am ersten Tag der Sperrung der Stadt in Betrieb, obwohl die Regierung nicht wesentliche Unternehmen zur Schließung aufforderte und die Bewohner warnte, zu Hause zu bleiben.

Viele Bekleidungsbosse gaben gegenüber MailOnline auch zu, dass sie während der ersten Sperrung nur teilweise geschlossen und den Betrieb wieder aufgenommen hatten, bevor sie dies hätten tun sollen.

Lokale Beamte haben bereits Bedenken geäußert, dass einer der Gründe für den Anstieg des Coronavirus in Leicester die schlechten Bedingungen sein könnten, denen Textilarbeiter mit wenig sozialer Distanzierung oder PSA ausgesetzt sind.

Sie arbeiten auch viele Stunden in stickigen Fabriken mit geringer Belüftung, was die Wahrscheinlichkeit einer Infektion mit Coronavirus erhöht.

Asim Ali, 34, Manager von Fazia Fashion, der sich im Sperrbereich befindet, sagte: „Wir haben weder von der Regierung noch von der örtlichen Behörde eine Anleitung erhalten, ob wir schließen oder offen bleiben sollen.

„Aber um ehrlich zu sein, haben wir beim ersten Lockdown so viel Geld verloren, dass wir es uns nicht leisten können, zu schließen. Es wäre eine Katastrophe für das Unternehmen und unsere Mitarbeiter. Wir bleiben also offen, unabhängig davon, was die Behörden uns mitteilen. & # 39;

Das Unternehmen beschäftigt 35 Mitarbeiter und die meisten von ihnen waren damit beschäftigt, Kleidung für eine Bestellung zu nähen, die bis Ende dieser Woche abgeschlossen sein musste. Nicht alle trugen Masken oder Handschuhe, während andere keine soziale Distanz pflegten.

Asim Ali, 34, Manager von Fazia Fashion, der sich im Sperrbereich befindet, sagte: "Wir hatten keine Anleitung von der Regierung oder der örtlichen Behörde, ob wir schließen oder offen bleiben sollten. Aber um ehrlich zu sein, haben wir beim ersten Lockdown so viel Geld verloren, dass wir es uns nicht leisten können, zu schließen. Es wäre eine Katastrophe für das Unternehmen und unsere Mitarbeiter. Wir bleiben also offen, unabhängig davon, was die Behörden uns mitteilen. “

Asim Ali, 34, Manager von Fazia Fashion, der sich im Sperrbereich befindet, sagte: „Wir haben weder von der Regierung noch von der örtlichen Behörde eine Anleitung erhalten, ob wir schließen oder offen bleiben sollen. Aber um ehrlich zu sein, haben wir beim ersten Lockdown so viel Geld verloren, dass wir es uns nicht leisten können, zu schließen. Es wäre eine Katastrophe für das Unternehmen und unsere Mitarbeiter. Wir bleiben also offen, unabhängig davon, was die Behörden uns mitteilen. & # 39;

Leicester hat die größte Anzahl von Textilarbeitern in Großbritannien und es gibt 1500 Bekleidungsunternehmen in der Stadt, die rund 10.000 Mitarbeiter beschäftigen, die meisten davon aus BAME-Gemeinden.

Zahlen zeigen bereits, dass BAME-Personen einem höheren Risiko ausgesetzt sind, sich mit Coronavirus zu infizieren oder daran zu sterben.

Mr Ali said: 'Our workers are predominantly South Asian, and they know the risks they are taking because they are most at risk of catching coronavirus. But what can they do? They are not rich people and need this money to survive.'

He admitted that the company reopened before it was supposed to during the first lockdown, shutting down for only four weeks.

'We lost around £20,000 per week during that period and had to reopen early. Our workers also wanted to come back. Orders have started picking up again but now this second lockdown has ruined things,' he added.

Workers at the Fazia fashion factory continue to work despite the newly reimposed lockdown

Workers at the Fazia fashion factory continue to work despite the newly reimposed lockdown

Workers operated their sewing machines despite the real risk of contracting Covid-19

Workers operated their sewing machines despite the real risk of contracting Covid-19

Richu Uppal, owner of Cute Girl, which specialises in making clothes for young women said that the company employs 12 people and would continue to operate.

She added: 'We might be getting some help from the Government but financially, we are in big trouble and so are our workers. We only closed for four weeks during the first lockdown.

'I know coronavirus can kill but so can hunger and that's why all of us need to continue working.'

Many of the workers inside the small, cramped factory where it was unbearably hot were unable to socially distance while none were wearing face masks or gloves.

Mohmed Talati, 55, also complained about the lack of official guidance

Mohmed Talati, 55, also complained about the lack of official guidance

Councillor Rashmikant Joshi, who represents the North Evington ward, which has the highest number of coronavirus cases in Leicester and is home to dozens of garment factories said: ‘We are still waiting for all the statistics to completely understand what is behind this increase in coronavirus infections. But the working conditions of many people in Leicester are not good, particularly those who work in the garment industry. I’m in little doubt that this is a contributory factor to the huge surge that we are witnessing’

Councillor Rashmikant Joshi, who represents the North Evington ward, which has the highest number of coronavirus cases in Leicester and is home to dozens of garment factories said: 'We are still waiting for all the statistics to completely understand what is behind this increase in coronavirus infections. But the working conditions of many people in Leicester are not good, particularly those who work in the garment industry. I'm in little doubt that this is a contributory factor to the huge surge that we are witnessing'

Mohmed Talati, 55, who runs 21 F.C, which specialises in cutting material for garment factories said: 'We'll continue to stay open because the factories are going to operate through this lockdown.

'While that happens, they'll need material cut for them. There has been very little guidance or advice provided to us. Nobody is sure if we are essential or non-essential and most people have taken the decision to continue operating.'

The manager of Easy Fit, which manufactures women's clothes said: 'We closed during the first lockdown for four weeks. After that we had to open, even though we weren't supposed to.

'Business was slowly returning to normal and now we have this problem. But we can't afford to close, and our staff can't afford not to work. It's as simple as that.'

Councillor Rashmikant Joshi, who represents the North Evington ward, which has the highest number of coronavirus cases in Leicester and is home to dozens of garment factories said: 'We are still waiting for all the statistics to completely understand what is behind this increase in coronavirus infections.

'But the working conditions of many people in Leicester are not good, particularly those who work in the garment industry. I'm in little doubt that this is a contributory factor to the huge surge that we are witnessing.'

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