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OBEs for parents of a 15 year old girl who died from a severe allergic reaction


The parents of a 15-year-old girl who died after an allergic reaction to a pret baguette on a BA flight say they are "humble" to accept OBEs in her memory for charity work after her death

  • Tanya and Nadim Ednan-Laperouse said they were "humble" to receive awards
  • Natasha Ednan-Laperouse from Fulham collapsed on a flight to Nice in July 2016
  • Parents have successfully campaigned for better labeling in the “Natasha Law”.

The parents of a 15-year-old girl who died of a severe allergic reaction after eating a Pret a Manger baguette were awarded OBEs on the New Year's Honor Roll.

Tanya and Nadim Ednan-Laperouse said they were "humbled" to accept their awards on behalf of their "loved one" Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, who collapsed on July 17, 2016 on a BA flight to Nice.

Natasha, of Fulham, west London, died of anaphylaxis after unwittingly eating sesame seeds in an artichoke, olive and tapenade baguette that she bought at Heathrow Airport.

Her mother and father, who have since established the Natasha Allergy Research Foundation and successfully installed Ministers for Improved Product Labeling, are recognized by the Queen for their contributions to charity and people with allergic diseases.

Natasha, of Fulham, west London, died of anaphylaxis after unwittingly eating sesame seeds in an artichoke, olive and tapenade baguette that she bought at Heathrow Airport

Natasha Ednan-Laperouse, 15, collapsed on July 17, 2016 on a flight to Nice after eating a Pret a Manger baguette

Tanya and Nadim Ednan-Laperouse said they were "humbled" for accepting their awards

Tanya and Nadim Ednan-Laperouse said they were "humbled" for accepting their awards

In a statement they said: “We are humble and honored to accept these awards on behalf of our beloved daughter Natasha.

"Natasha was a passionate believer in social justice and the bright torch she carried for others inspires us every day."

The foundation plans to set up a research center at the University of Southampton to find a cure for allergies and has already donated £ 400,000 to educate scientists.

Mr. and Mrs. Ednan-Laperouse hope it will help scientists prevent "unnecessary" deaths and hospitalizations from severe allergic reactions and "ultimately we hope to help eradicate allergic diseases from this planet".

The foundation was established to fund and leverage medical breakthroughs in allergies, support academic and industrial research, and develop new therapies that offer hope for effective allergy treatments and work toward a cure.

Her mother and father (pictured with her son Alex) are recognized by the Queen for their services to charity and people with allergic diseases

Her mother and father (pictured with her son Alex) are recognized by the Queen for their services to charity and people with allergic diseases

The parents have also managed to get new protective measures for food allergy sufferers under the introduction of the “Natasha Law”.

All businesses in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are required to provide full ingredient labeling for prepackaged foods.

The couple said, “Natasha's law will come into effect in October 2021, ending the loophole that has cost our daughter her life.

& # 39; It will help save many other lives. However, this is only the beginning of our journey. & # 39;

The coroner ruled that the lack of allergen information on the pret baguette package "calmed" Natasha.

While supermarket sandwiches are required to have full ingredients listed on the package, those made in-store do not currently have such a requirement.

How Natasha's "beloved" death changed the law

July 17, 2016: Natasha bought the sandwich and got an itchy throat about three minutes later. Shortly afterwards, she collapsed on the flight and was treated by paramedics after landing in France before she was taken to a hospital in Nice. She was pronounced dead around 8 p.m.

September 2018: Coroner Dr. Sean Cummings said Natasha was mistakenly "reassured" that the baguette was allergenic.

Clive Schlee, CEO of Pret, said the company was "I am deeply sorry for Natasha's death" and swore "meaningful change".

September 2019: After many campaigns by Tanya and Nadim Ednan-Laperouse, Natasha's law was presented to parliament.

October 2021: The "Natasha Act" comes into force in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

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