TOP TRENDING

NOW the government says BTECs can be canceled … only HOURS before students are supposed to take their first exams


Students are in limbo today after ministers agreed to cancel BTEC exams – but left it up to schools to decide – just hours before the first tests across the country were due to begin.

The U-turn came hours before the under-fire Education Secretary Gavin Williamson faced the Commons after finally confirming there will be no GCSE and A-level exams this year and losing his battle to keep schools open.

Students will again have to let their teachers decide with grades this summer after a heated argument broke out last night over the decision to cancel the exams for the second time in a row.

MailOnline has been inundated with emails from panicked parents and worried students as the government was accused of "dithering" and millions of parents had their children home schooled by at least February 22nd.

But anxious BTEC students are still waiting for confirmation on whether their exams will take place from today after the Ministry of Education dodged an outright ban saying "schools / colleges can offer exams if they see fit."

Angry Nottinghamshire parent Simon Brooks says his daughter Kaitlyn and her friends "don't know if they're coming or going" and left his 17-year-old in tears last night.

He said to MailOnline: & # 39; This is a ridiculous decision for me. Of all the exam types in this country, BTEC is more suited to teacher graded grades as it is graded and graded continuously throughout the year. Why do those who graduate from high school receive protection from last year? I am angry and upset with her and her friends.

Tony Gordon of Essex said, “My daughter was due to take a BTEC 13th year auditing next week, but it has now been brought forward to this Friday as she was advised today and cost her precious weekend revision. The teacher even said he had no idea whether it would actually go on. & # 39;

In the midst of today's chaos in schools:

  • Prime Minister Johnson's cabinet was bitterly divided over the decision to close schools.
  • Mr Johnson defended his screeching U-turn of coronavirus, which closed schools under new national lockdown in England;
  • The BBC unveils its "greatest educational offering in history" as schools across the country are closed.
  • Every 50th resident of England – around one million people – is infected with coronavirus.
  • Mr Johnson promised to inform the nation about Britain's Covid vaccination campaign every day starting next week.

Gavin Williamson has been accused of re-making school decisions when the BTEC exams were canceled – but only if a school wants – and left students in abeyance

Charlotte Rose helps one of her children who is home schooled in Milton Keynes today

Charlotte Rose helps one of her children who is home schooled in Milton Keynes today

Perivale Primary School is closed after Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that all educational institutions must be closed by February 22nd

Perivale Primary School is closed after Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that all educational institutions must be closed by February 22nd

Gavin Williamson has been heavily criticized for having no specific plan to replace exams.

A former chief inspector of Education Guard Ofsted alleged that Mr. Williamson "did a lot wrong" while top private schools said it was "premature" to cancel exams.

The students are now in limbo as a new system is being worked out. The Exam Regulator Ofqual is asked to initiate a consultation before making a decision.

The process will mean that students will likely wait weeks – if not months – for a plan, although there is strong suspicion that teacher grades will play a crucial role.

Ex-Ofsted Chief Inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw said of Mr. Williamson, "He's done a lot wrong so far, hasn't he?"

Q&A: What happened and what will replace exams?

What happened?

All GCSEs and high school exams were canceled for the second year in a row after Boris Johnson ordered schools to close for extended periods during the third national lockdown.

The fate of the technical and professional qualifications planned for this month remains uncertain after ministers said they could still go on but met strong opposition from colleges and students.

What replaces GCSEs and A-Levels?

Since students are sure to lose at least half a semester of crucial learning in key exam years – after last year's chaos – the government believes that even watered down exams would be significantly unfair to students in the hardest hit regions by the Virus or in families where distance learning is more difficult.

As such, the focus is likely to be on teacher-graded grades, which are formulated by education staff who know their students best.

Is the plan safe?

No. Although Education Secretary Gavin Williamson will tell MPs today his priorities for exam year groups, the new system needs to be reviewed by the Examination Inspectorate Ofqual, which has to consult schools and teachers about plans and attempts to eradicate potential flaws in the system that could lead to injustices.

This means that students are likely to face a significant delay before the plans are set in stone.

What happened last year Wasn't it a disaster?

The exams were also canceled in 2020. Teachers were asked to create grades and a ranking for their students.

Though not without its complications, this side of things went relatively smoothly.

The chaos struck when Ofqual processed the tokens through what Boris Johnson called the "mutant algorithm".

This resulted in thousands of students being unfairly demoted, which triggered an about-face and abandoned the entire "moderation process".

With new leaders in the wake of the scandal, it is almost certain that Ofqual will avoid repeating the reliance on computerized exam arbitrators, although some systems have yet to be worked out to address potential abuses.

When asked if he should resign, Sir Michael replied, “He is making other people resign – permanent secretaries and the boss of Ofqual. He must take ultimate responsibility for what happened. Ministers do not tend to stand down for mistakes they have made now as they did before. "

In the meantime, leading private schools have spoken out strongly against the decision to cancel exams.

Dr. Simon Hyde, of the Headmasters' Conference representing schools like Eton and Harrow, said: “HMC believes that any decision to cancel all exams in England this summer would be premature.

"With the hope that the vaccine is on the horizon and the government is now putting in place strict lockdown measures, teachers and students can be more confident that June public exams can be safely taken."

He added, “11th and 13th grade students are not allowed to have the carpet pulled out from under their study. You have suffered a lot. "

When asked if his position meant that all GCSE and A levels in England were canceled, the DfE said it had no further comment.

It comes after Boris Johnson failed to guarantee that all students in England would be back in school before the summer break.

In a televised address on Monday announcing the third lockdown in England, Mr Johnson admitted that the closure of schools means "it is not possible or fair for all exams to go ahead as usual this summer".

In a statement, Mr Williamson said: “It is important now that we support our young people at home, including ensuring that all students receive the best possible distance education and that those students who are due to take exams can continue to progress to the next level education or training. & # 39;

The process will mean that students will likely wait weeks – if not months – for a plan, although there is strong suspicion that teacher grades will play a crucial role.

It is believed that officials are in favor of building on the successful aspects of last year's evaluation process while staying away from "mutated algorithms" or injustices.

This means that like the summer of 2020, teachers' judgments will be at the top of the grading and they will likely be encouraged to give the benefit of the doubt to teenagers who are deprived of the classroom routine.

In a statement to MPs on Wednesday, Mr Williamson is only expected to spread ideas.

Ofqual said, 'We are considering a number of options in order to get the fairest possible outcome in the circumstances. We will update as soon as possible. & # 39;

Education Select Committee chair Robert Halfon said Mr. Williamson needs to "make and stick to" policy while ensuring "a level playing field".

He said, "Everyone has marched up and down the hill, so they have to make a decision that is clear, understandable, and does what it promises."

The principals' conference, which represents nearly 300 leading private schools, said the cancellation of exams was "premature".

Secretary General Dr. Simon Hyde said: “While it is important that the learning loss some students have experienced is taken into account and that disadvantaged students are not further disadvantaged, HMC believes that any decision to cancel all exams in England this summer is premature would . & # 39;

He added: “The best way to ensure fairness is not to cancel all exams, but to moderate the assessment in whatever form externally. We need determined leadership and a willingness to compromise to create such a system. Our students don't earn less. & # 39;

Barnaby Lenon, Chair of the Independent Schools Council, said there was no "perfect solution for grading modalities for 11th and 13th grade students given the current course of the virus".

He acknowledged that views across the education sector differ and that "many students will be disappointed in losing the opportunity to test their learning through traditional exams".

He added: "It is now up to the government and Ofqual to work with education professionals to develop a fair grading system that rewards all of our young people with the grades they deserve."

Ex-Ofsted Chief Inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw said of Mr. Williamson: "He's done a lot wrong so far, hasn't he?"

When asked if he should resign, Sir Michael replied, “He is making other people resign – permanent secretaries and the boss of Ofqual. He must take ultimate responsibility for what happened. Ministers do not tend to stand down for mistakes they have made now as they did before. & # 39;

He told Radio 4's The World At One that the Department of Education is not “well run” and insisted, “When you talk to school principals – I speak to you regularly as an ex-headmaster – you lack confidence into the guidance they receive. & # 39;

Despite calling for this month's Btec exams to be canceled in light of the lockdown, the government has left it up to school and college administrators to decide whether to proceed with the professional exam series.

The decision came after ministers were asked to cancel exams in January.

Elsewhere, the question of whether exams like GCSEs are conducted in Northern Ireland has not been resolved.

The Minister of Education is expected to present proposals to the executive on Wednesday.

Earlier, at a press conference on Downing Street, the Prime Minister said he was "optimistic" that "things will really be very different by spring".

Kelly Saunder's daughter Jodi is taking her BTEC exams this week. She is sad: “This year's children were absent from March to July and have been a hit and miss since September. My daughter is 17 years old and in the sixth grade. She will have all but missed a year of her 18-month course on science, dance, and photography.

Shannon Harper suffers today from those who suffer after schools closed and 11th hour exams were canceled. Jodi is one of the thousands who still take BTEC exams under stressful circumstances

Jody Saunders (left) and Shannon Harper (right) suffer today among those who suffer after schools closed and 11th hour exams were canceled. Jodi is one of the thousands who still take BTEC exams under stressful circumstances

Lyndsey Brand's daughter Isabelle, 18, and son Harry, 15, were due to take their exams this summer after years of hard work

Lyndsey Brand's daughter Isabelle, 18, and son Harry, 15, were due to take their exams this summer after years of hard work

Boris Johnson didn't guarantee all students across England would be back in the classroom before the summer break last night

Boris Johnson didn't guarantee all students across England would be back in the classroom before the summer break last night

Timeline: The Prime Minister's Path to Lockdown 3 and How Gavin Williamson Threatened to Sue Schools Closing Before the Boris Shut Down

October 14th

Boris Johnson rules out a two week breaker after calling Labor.

October 31

The Prime Minister announces a four-week lockdown from November 5th.

2. December

The national lockdown ends, but a new tier system will be introduced, with London and the Southeast in Tier 2 and areas to the north in Tier 3.

December 14th

London and Essex move to Tier 3 when Matt Hancock reveals a new mutant strain of Covid has been found.

15th December

Boris Johnson ruled out further Christmas restrictions, saying, "I want to make it clear we don't want to ban Christmas."

Gavin Williamson threatens councils to close schools with legal action, forcing Greenwich schools to reopen after a day

19. December

The government is announcing a new Tier 4 – and banning mixing at Christmas for much of the country

December 22

SAGE scientists recommend closing schools to avoid the & # 39; R & # 39; to hold or below 1

December 28th

Gavin Williams convinces Boris Johnson not to close elementary schools and to open them on time on January 4th

But secondaries are later closed until January 18th

January 3, 2021

Boris Johnson says parents in England should send elementary school children to school saying they are safe. This is very, very important to emphasize and the risk to children, adolescents and staff is very small. "

January 4th

Boris Johnson announces a national lockdown and closes all schools because they could act as "vectors for transmission".

However, he was unable to give parents, students and teachers a firm assurance that face-to-face classes can be resumed in the current school year.

It followed him when he announced yesterday evening that all schools and colleges across the country must remain closed as part of his new coronavirus lockdown.

The schools should not be closed until mid-February at the earliest, when the closure is to be checked.

The massive interruption in learning has forced ministers to dissolve plans for high school graduation and GCSE exams, which will largely run as usual in May and June.

At the meeting that evening, Mr. Johnson was told that parents want the government to have "realism" about when students can switch back to school from distance learning.

When asked if he could tell parents that all the kids will definitely be back to school before the summer break, Mr. Johnson said, “I'll just go back to the answer I really gave to Robert Peston.

“We believe there is a lot we can do with the vaccination program to get the most at risk out of the virus' path.

“This clearly gives our country the opportunity to do things differently and approach the whole problem of non-pharmaceutical interventions in very different ways.

"I am full of optimism and fundamental hope about the position … that I think things will really be very different by spring and I would surely tell every parent in the country that."

Mr Johnson had previously been asked by ITV's Mr Peston how confident he was that the lockdown will be lifted by March.

The Prime Minister said, “I think it all depends. Our ability to get out of lockdown measures, our ability to deal with this quickly, depends on a number of things. & # 39;

Mr Johnson cited the introduction of vaccinations and people following the lockdown rules as two factors that will have a significant impact on when the rules can be relaxed.

The Prime Minister decided to announce the closure of schools last night, just a day after encouraging parents to send their children back to the classrooms this week.

The closure plans mean schools and colleges will be closed to all but vulnerable children and the children of key workers, and everyone else will switch to distance learning.

School closings have thrown the school year into chaos, and Mr Johnson told students that "alternative arrangements" for exams need to be made this summer.

The Ministry of Education and the Examination Board Ofqual are now trying to find out exactly how students are being assessed.

The government's official lockdown guidelines on exams state: “Under the circumstances, we do not believe it is possible that all summer exams will go ahead as planned.

& # 39; We will accordingly work with Ofqual to consult quickly and make alternative arrangements that will enable students to make fair progress.

"Public exams and professional assessments due in January are proceeding as planned."

Slides presented at today's briefing on Downing Street showed that one in 50 people in England is believed to be infected with coronavirus

Slides presented at today's briefing on Downing Street showed that one in 50 people in England is believed to be infected with coronavirus

The government had previously insisted that the exams should be taken in 2021 after the schools shutdown meant they had to be scrapped last year and students were given their predicted grades instead.

School principals have urged Mr. Johnson to stop the tests again because "the general health, safety of students and staff should take precedence over the exams".

Angry students and parents claimed that it was simply “not fair” to get teenagers to take exams when face-to-face contact times were cut so sharply.

Kelly Saunders & # 39; daughter Jody is taking her BTEC exams this week.

She said, “This year's kids missed school March through July and have been hit and miss since September.

“My daughter is 17 years old and in the sixth grade. She will have missed almost a year of her 18 month course on science, dance, and photography.

“In the first phase of photography she had stopped working at all and hardly anything for the other two subjects.

& # 39; She has exams next week as they are Btecs and it seems they are still going on. But without preparation. It's such a mess and she's angry.

A family in Knutsford, Cheshire watches Prime Minister Boris Johnson deliver a televised address to the nation from 10 Downing Street as he closes all schools through February 22nd

A family in Knutsford, Cheshire watches Prime Minister Boris Johnson deliver a televised address to the nation from 10 Downing Street as he closes all schools through February 22nd

BBC presents "the largest educational offer in its history"

The BBC unveils its "greatest educational offering in history" as schools across the country are closed. CBBC will broadcast a three-hour block of elementary school programs starting Jan. 11, starting at 9 a.m., the company has announced. These include BBC Live Lessons and BBC Bitesize Daily, as well as other educational programs like Our School and Celebrity Supply Teacher, Horrible Histories, Art Ninja, and Operation Ouch.

It comes when England is banned for the third time in less than a year. Boris Johnson is canceling the A-level and GCSE exams and closing all elementary and secondary schools. Tim Davie, Director General of the BBC said: “It has been central to the BBC over the past year to ensure that children across the UK have the opportunity to continue to follow relevant core parts of their country's school curriculum.

"Education is absolutely important – the BBC is here to play its part and I am delighted that we have been able to bring this to the public so quickly." BBC Two provides content for secondary school students with programming in support of the GCSE curriculum with a minimum of two hours of content each day of the week.

Lyndsey Brand's daughter Isabelle, 18, and son Harry, 15, were due to take their exams this summer.

Ms. Brand said, “We haven't heard from either school, but I assume the schools have not formulated a plan in response to the news from last night.

“The online learning offering in both schools has been fantastic, but it's obviously not the same as a teacher-led classroom.

“I just hope my daughter gets the grades she needs to move on to the next level of her college education and my son gets the grades he deserves.

& # 39; Hopefully no algorithms or class ranking system. Just a series of tests to determine what level they are working at.

Shannon Harper, 20, studied at the Royal Academy of Music for two years but took a year to graduate from high school and secure a place on a chemical engineering course.

She said, “This news got like a wrecking ball into my plans as I sit A-Levels independently and therefore don't have a school that I can rely on to accommodate me.

“I am extremely concerned that many other people in my position will be at the bottom of the list of government considerations.

"Also, I paid over £ 5,000 to get this high school diploma, a sum that has nearly decimated my savings despite all the money I paid for rent and food."

Debbie Powell of Shropshire said, “My concern as the parent of an 11th grade student is how much GCSE exam cancellation will affect them with future opportunities and employment opportunities. Is he being viewed as one of the coronavirus generations and his grades being questioned for never taking the exams?

"I am so sorry for a generation with an educational deficit that may never know what their true potential is."

Julia Raned from London wrote: “My son is attending his GCSEs this year and had planned his ridicule in early December. The day before his first ridicule, he was told to self-isolate for 14 days.

“We knew he would come back for Christmas and do his mocking on the 5th, then his excellent headmaster sent a revised schedule for the mocking starting on the 6th instead of the 5th.

“We spent all day with me yesterday helping him revise his chemistry GCSE model, only to have it canceled at 8:00 p.m. last night.

Aai & # 39; sha Mallik told MailOnline: & # 39; My son is 11 years old and is expected to complete his GCSEs in a few months.

& # 39; He has definitely not made any progress since last March when the lockdown began, as he would have done for a normal year.

“Not only that, the government has promised that a huge fund will be used to tutor children so they won't fall behind. However, I have not been told by any parent I have spoken to that they have been offered this.

“Our 11th year children and those graduating from high school should come first to receive the benefits of these funds. Instead, we get links to revision books, which in turn cost more money.

One in 50 people in the UK now has COVID – but PM Boris Johnson says 1.3 million have now been vaccinated and promises the UK can fire shots at the most vulnerable by mid-February

The new lock in England at a glance

England is placed on a full national lockdown that will last until halfway through February.

According to the new rules:

  • All elementary and secondary schools are included immediate effect
  • Lessons remain only for vulnerable students and children of key workers.
  • They are slated to reopen after the half-time break in February.
  • It is unlikely that A-Level and GCSE exams will run as planned in the summer.
  • The universities will remain closed to students until mid-February.
  • Kindergartens remain fully open.
  • The public should stay home unless they have to leave for one of only five reasons: when they cannot work from home, shop for necessities, play sports, provide care, and for medical treatment or emergencies.
  • All non-essential retailers, hospitality and "personal care" such as hairdressers must close.
  • Restaurants and other eateries can continue to operate for takeout and delivery.
  • However, pubs are no longer allowed to offer take-away alcohol sales.
  • Children's playgrounds remain open.
  • All indoor and outdoor sports facilities, including golf courses, gyms, swimming pools, and tennis courts, must be closed, and team sports cannot take place outdoors.
  • Elite sports such as the Premier League can be operated according to their own standards.

The instructions are aimed at people who are fit and healthy.

There is additional advice for people who are clinically extremely susceptible to coronavirus and for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus infection.

You shouldn't go to work, school, college or university and limit the amount of time you spend outside the home. The instructions state that you should only go out for medical appointments, exercise, or when it is important.

The rules for all people in England also state:

  • You can't leave home to socialize with someone who you don't live with or who you're not in a support bubble with (unless you are legally allowed to form one).
  • You can exercise alone, with someone else, or with your household or your support bladder.
  • You shouldn't meet anyone else you don't live with or with whom you've formed a support bubble unless there is a valid reason why you can.
  • Stay 2 meters away from people who are not in your household.

Detailed instructions on national blocking:

You must not leave your home or be outside your home unless you have a "reasonable excuse". This is regulated by law. The police can take action against you if you leave the house without a “reasonable apology” and impose a fine (permanent complaint).

You can get a fixed penalty of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses.

A "reasonable apology" includes:

  • Work – You can only leave home for work if it is inappropriate for you to do your work from home
  • Volunteering – You can also leave home to do volunteer or community service
  • Essential Activities – You can leave home to buy things in stores or get services. You can also leave home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person, or someone who is self-isolating
  • Education and Childcare – You can only leave home for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children that you are eligible to attend.
  • Meeting with Others and Care – You can leave home to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to form one), to informally care for children under the age of 14 under a child care bubble (e.g. to To enable parents to work) to look after disabled or vulnerable people
  • Exercise – You can continue to exercise alone, with someone else, or with your household or support bladder, limited to once a day and not outside of your area
  • Medical Reasons – You can leave home for medical reasons, including a COVID-19 test for medical appointments and emergencies
  • Harm and Compassionate Visits – You can leave the house to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness, or to avoid the risk of harm (such as domestic violence).
  • You can also leave the house to visit someone who is dying, someone in a nursing home (if this is permitted under the guidance of the nursing home), a hospice or hospital, or to accompany them to a doctor's appointment
  • Animal welfare reasons – You can leave your home for animal welfare reasons, e.g. B. To contact a veterinary service for advice or treatment
  • Communal Worship and Life Events – You can leave your home to attend or attend a place of worship for communal worship, funeral or event related to a death, burial site or memorial garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony.

There are other reasonable excuses. For example, you may leave your home to comply with legal obligations or to engage in activities related to buying, selling, renting or renting residential property, or when it is reasonable to vote in an election or referendum.

Boris Johnson announced tonight that one in 50 England residents – around a million people – is infected with coronavirus as he defended his U-turn to put the country into lockdown.

The Prime Minister told a meeting on Downing Street that the searing spread of the mutated version of the disease meant there was no choice but to impose a lockdown.

But he insisted that measures can get the situation under control while vaccines are rolled out – and revealed that 1.3 million people have now had bumps as he dismissed criticism that, in relation to the most vulnerable categories, which will be covered by mid-February is "promising".

Mr Johnson vowed to "jab by jab" the country with information on the crucial process.

He was flanked at the press conference by heads of medicine and science, Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance – whose warnings of the danger of overwhelming the NHS sparked the extraordinary U-turn of pushing England into new restrictions.

The podiums were once again adorned with the March Ineligibility slogan: "Stay home, protect the NHS, save lives".

When asked if he believed the goal of vaccinating more than 13 million people in the next seven weeks was possible, Prof. Whitty said it was "realistic but not easy".

However, the medic also delivered somber news that some restrictions may still be required next winter as the virus is likely to be in the regular cycle like the flu.

The extent of the problem was underscored tonight when the UK reported a record 60,916 cases – an increase of nearly 15 percent from last Tuesday. The death toll was 830, twice as many as last week.

It is estimated that one in 30 Londoners – more than 290,000 people – had the virus on Jan. 2, figures from the Office of National Statistics show.

Mr Johnson said the total of 1.3 million people vaccinated included 1.1 million people in England and 650,000 people over the age of 80 – 23 percent of all ages in England.

"That means almost one in four of the most vulnerable groups will have significant levels of immunity in two to three weeks," he said.

"So I believe that the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization has rightly drawn up a program that will save most lives the fastest."

Prof Whitty and Sir Patrick confirmed that giving more people a single dose of the vaccine instead of the recommended double dose to half the number could potentially promote mutations.

But he said the public health benefits of having more people with some resistance are greater.

"It's a real concern, but a pretty minor real concern within the system," he said.

"The public health case is really strong for it."

Sir Patrick warned that the virus would change anyway and vaccines would have to change.

"The virus will likely mutate … at this point different vaccines will be needed."

Herr Johnson äußerte sich auch düster zu den Schulen und weigerte sich, kategorisch zu erklären, dass sie vor den Sommerferien zurückkehren werden – obwohl er betonte, dass sie oberste Priorität haben und die Dinge bis zum Frühjahr „anders“ sein würden.

Während die Minister darum kämpfen, zu verhindern, dass der brutale Druck den Gastgewerbe- und Freizeitsektor auslöscht, hat Rishi Sunak ein weiteres Rettungspaket in Höhe von 4,6 Milliarden Pfund vorgestellt, das einmalige Zuschüsse von bis zu 9.000 Pfund bietet, um die Veranstaltungsorte für die nächsten sieben Wochen am Leben zu erhalten.

Die Bundeskanzlerin wies auch darauf hin, dass der Urlaub bei Bedarf über den April hinaus verlängert werden könne, obwohl die Kreditaufnahme der Regierung außer Kontrolle gerate.

Die Unternehmen fordern die Regierung jedoch auf, noch weiter zu gehen, indem sie Mehrwertsteuer und Zinserleichterungen anbieten.

Und die Unruhen in Tory nehmen zu, da befürchtet wird, dass Herr Johnson falsche Hoffnungen geweckt hat, dass die Maßnahmen bis Mitte Februar aufgehoben werden können.

Michael Gove gab heute Morgen zu, dass es keine "Gewissheit" auf der Zeitachse gab, da dies davon abhängt, dass die Regierung ihre hoch ehrgeizigen Ziele für die Impfung von mehr als 13 Millionen der am stärksten gefährdeten Personen in der Gesellschaft erreicht.

Der Minister des Kabinetts warnte auch davor, dass selbst im besten Fall nicht alle Bordsteine ​​verschwinden würden, da er die müde Öffentlichkeit auf lange Sicht auf die sich schnell ausbreitende neue Variante des Coronavirus vorbereitete.

Einige konservative Abgeordnete wollen wissen, warum im Herbst keine weiteren Vorbereitungen für die Impfaktion getroffen wurden, und weisen darauf hin, dass Israel erfolgreicher war, obwohl es keine „funktionierende“ Regierung gab.

Der Gewerkschaftsführer Keir Starmer sagte, das Vorgehen sei "unerlässlich", und seine Abgeordneten würden sie unterstützen und ihre Zustimmung im Unterhaus effektiv garantieren. Er kritisierte jedoch die Regierung dafür, dass sie ihren Kurs nicht früher geändert habe, und äußerte ernsthafte Zweifel am Optimismus hinsichtlich der Verteilung von Impfstoffen.

„Ich hoffe, er ist nicht zu vielversprechend. Es wird ein Kampf und wir müssen diese Arbeit machen. & # 39;

Er bestand darauf, dass die Regierung ein "massives, sofortiges und rund um die Uhr verfügbares Impfprogramm einrichten müsse, um bis Ende des Monats in jedem Dorf und jeder Stadt, jeder Hauptstraße und jeder Allgemeinarztpraxis Millionen Dosen pro Woche zu verabreichen".

Nur einen Tag, nachdem er die Eltern aufgefordert hatte, ihre Kinder zurückzuschicken, erklärte Herr Johnson gestern Abend in einer düsteren Ansprache von Nr. 10, dass die Grund- und weiterführenden Schulen ab heute geschlossen werden und nur die schutzbedürftigen und Nachkommen von Schlüsselarbeitern eintreten dürfen.

Kindergärten können offen bleiben. Universitätsstudenten werden jedoch aufgefordert, zu Hause zu bleiben und aus der Ferne zu studieren, während GCSE- und A-Level-Prüfungen nicht wie geplant durchgeführt werden.

Jugendliche wissen möglicherweise wochenlang nicht, wie ihre Prüfungen ersetzt werden, und Ofsted wird voraussichtlich eine Konsultation einleiten, obwohl Regierungsquellen sagten, dass einige Notfallpläne bereits in Betracht gezogen wurden.

Nach den neuen Leitlinien, die über Nacht veröffentlicht werden und nicht unbedingt erforderlich sind, müssen alle Gastgewerbe, Fitnessstudios und Schwimmbäder geschlossen werden. Rishi Sunak wird heute ein weiteres Unterstützungspaket vorlegen, da die Befürchtungen über die Auswirkungen auf die Wirtschaft zunehmen.

Cafés, Bars und Restaurants dürfen zum Mitnehmen servieren – aber aufgrund der Verschärfung der drakonischen Maßnahmen im letzten Frühjahr dürfen sie keinen Alkohol servieren. Gefährdete Personen werden aufgefordert, nach Möglichkeit abzuschirmen.

Die Öffentlichkeit darf das Haus wieder nur aus einem von fünf Gründen verlassen: wenn nötig zur Arbeit gehen, Notwendigkeiten einkaufen, Sport treiben – mit einer anderen Person aus einem anderen Haushalt zusammen sein, sich um jemanden kümmern oder medizinische Hilfe suchen oder vor Bedrohung fliehen wie häusliche Gewalt.

Während sich England an die Idee einer dritten nationalen Sperrung und monatelang mehr Coronavirus-Chaos gewöhnt:

  • Rishi Sunak kündigte weitere Rettungsaktionen in Höhe von 4,6 Milliarden Pfund für Unternehmen an, die von Lockdowns betroffen waren, als Ökonomen vor dem "kolossalen" Schlag der wachsenden Pandemie warnten.
  • Die Zahl der Covid-19-Patienten im Krankenhaus in England belief sich nach den neuesten Zahlen am 8. Januar um 8 Uhr morgens auf 26.467 – ein Anstieg von 21 Prozent gegenüber der Vorwoche;
  • Ankünfte an den britischen Grenzen müssen nachweisen, dass sie in den letzten 72 Stunden in einer weiteren großen Kehrtwende der Regierung auf Covid negativ getestet wurden.
  • Die Polizei hat gewarnt, dass die Durchsetzung der Sperrung schwierig sein wird, da eine große Anzahl von Beamten bereits krank oder selbstisolierend ist.
  • Scientists have warned that even the new tough measures might not be enough to contain the mutant coronavirus strain;
  • The PM is set to hold a press conference with medical and science chiefs Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance at 5pm;
  • Streets and city centres were quiet as Britons digested the new restrictions being placed on their lives;
  • Hundreds of medical professionals have called for hospital staff to be given higher grade personal protective equipment (PPE) amid growing concern over airborne transmission of coronavirus.
Boris Johnson told a Downing Street briefing that the spread of the mutant version of the disease had made lockdown impossible to avoid

Boris Johnson told a Downing Street briefing that the spread of the mutant version of the disease had made lockdown impossible to avoid

Boris Johnson was flanked at the press conference tonight by medical and science chiefs Chris Whitty (left) and Patrick Vallance (right) - whose warnings about the threat of the NHS being overwhelmed sparked the extraordinary U-turn to plunge England into new restrictions

Boris Johnson was flanked at the press conference tonight by medical and science chiefs Chris Whitty (left) and Patrick Vallance (right) – whose warnings about the threat of the NHS being overwhelmed sparked the extraordinary U-turn to plunge England into new restrictions

Slides presented at the briefing showed that one in 50 people in England are thought to be infected with coronavirus

Slides presented at the briefing showed that one in 50 people in England are thought to be infected with coronavirus

Mr Johnson vowed to use 'every second' under the stringent restrictions to put an 'invisible shield' around the elderly and vulnerable through a mass vaccination programme.

'I believe that when everybody looks at the position, people understand overwhelmingly that we have no choice,' he said.

'When the Office of National Statistics (ONS) is telling us that more than 2 per cent of the population is now infected – that's over one million people in England.

Covid restrictions might still be needed next winter, warns Whitty

Coronavirus restrictions could still be needed next winter, the government's chief medical officer warned tonight.

In one of the most alarming sections of the No10 briefing, Prof Chris Whitty said that some curbs may have to be brought back into place at the end of the year.

He said: 'If we did not do all the things all of us must now do, if people don't take the stay at home seriously, the risk at this point in time, in the middle of winter with this new variant, is extraordinarily high.'

He said the risk level will gradually decrease over time with measures being 'lifted by degrees possibly at different rates in different parts of the country, we'll have to see'.

'We'll then get over time to a point where people say this level of risk is something society is prepared to tolerate and lift right down to almost no restrictions at all,' he added.

'We might have to bring in a few in next winter for example, that's possible, because winter will benefit the virus.'

'And when today we have reported another 60,000 new cases, and when the number of patients in hospitals in England is now 40 per cent higher than at the first peak in April.

'I think obviously everybody – you all – want to be sure that we in Government are now using every second of this lockdown to put that invisible shield around the elderly and the vulnerable in the form of vaccination and so to begin to bring this crisis to an end.'

Batting away pessimism on his own benches, Mr Johnson said there is a 'prospect' the lockdown can be eased in mid-February.

'When a very considerable proportion of the most vulnerable groups have been vaccinated … then there really is the prospect of beginning the relaxation of some of these measures.

'But you will also appreciate there are a lot of caveats, a lot of ifs built into that, the most important of which is that we all now follow the guidance.'

But in one of the most alarming sections of the briefing, Prof Whitty said that some restrictions may have to be brought back into place next winter to control the virus.

He said: 'If we did not do all the things all of us must now do, if people don't take the stay at home seriously, the risk at this point in time, in the middle of winter with this new variant, is extraordinarily high.'

He said the risk level will gradually decrease over time with measures being 'lifted by degrees possibly at different rates in different parts of the country, we'll have to see'.

'We'll then get over time to a point where people say this level of risk is something society is prepared to tolerate and lift right down to almost no restrictions at all,' he added.

'We might have to bring in a few in next winter for example, that's possible, because winter will benefit the virus.'

The extraordinary third national squeeze will come into effect in the early hours tomorrow after the regulations are laid today, but Mr Johnson urged the public to adopt the new rules straight away. MPs will get a vote on them on Wednesday when Parliament is recalled.

Those who break the rules face a £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400.

High-ranking Tory MPs had joined the opposition and called for another national ban. However, the idea of ​​tightening restrictions sparked anger among other conservatives, who insist on the country's experience with the pandemic that lockdowns are not working and crippling the economy.

There are claims that at least two MPs have now sent letters of no confidence in the PM to Conservative backbench chief Sir Graham Brady – although the numbers are nowhere near the threshold to put his position in doubt.

The unrest over the vaccination campaign has increased and the ministers have not prepared for it.

"We need an expansion of vaccinations, as Israel did," a backbencher told MailOnline. “Why aren't we there already? Why wasn't the summer and autumn time used to raise the vaccine army?

'The only limitation should be the speed at which manufacturers can deliver it to you.

“The whole future of the economy, the future of saving more lives, the future of a sense of normalcy is in the hands of the vaccine. We are there now. & # 39;

Other high-ranking Tory MPs were just as grim. "We are too promising and too unsuccessful," said one. & # 39; It's a big risk. You are not prepared and unwilling to do this.

“The problem is, people don't understand the logistics of giving this vaccine and checking that people are all right and doing the paperwork. It's not just about poking someone in the arm. & # 39;

With his hands clasped together and seated behind a desk in Downing Street last night, Mr Johnson made clear there is no chance of them being lifted for at least seven weeks – and possibly longer if the vaccine rollout does not go well.

'Our hospitals are under more pressure than at any time since the start of the pandemic. It's clear we need to do more.. while our vaccines are rolled out,' he said.

He said it was not "possible or fair" for exams to go ahead as usual this summer.

"The coming weeks are going to be the toughest, but I really think we're reaching the end of the fight," he said, promising that the top four categories on the vaccine distribution list had their first pushes by mid-February.

There are 13.2million people in the top four groups on the vaccination list – care home residents and the over-80s, frontline healthcare workers, the over-70s and the clinically vulnerable.

But the Prime Minister admitted that he could only give assurance that the situation will improve assuming that 'our understanding of the virus does not change again'.

He said: 'By the middle of February, if things go well and with a fair wind in our sails, we expect to have offered the first vaccine dose to everyone in the four top priority groups identified by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation.

'That means vaccinating all residents in a care home for older adults and their carers, everyone over the age of 70, all frontline health and social care workers, and everyone who is clinically extremely vulnerable.

'If we succeed in vaccinating all those groups, we will have removed huge numbers of people from the path of the virus.

'And of course, that will eventually enable us to lift many of the restrictions we have endured for so long.'

Mr Johnson said he was left with no option after being confronted with catastrophic figures about the burden on the NHS by science chiefs today.

Hospital patients with coronavirus had risen by 40 per cent over a week, and are now higher than at the peak of the first wave.

Downing Street issued a series of slides showing the problem the country faces due to the new variant of the virus - the evidence that apparently forced Mr Johnson into his latest extraordinary U-turn

Downing Street issued a series of slides showing the problem the country faces due to the new variant of the virus – the evidence that apparently forced Mr Johnson into his latest extraordinary U-turn

Hundreds of thousands of non-essential retailers will have to keep their doors closed under England's third nation-wide lockdown

Hundreds of thousands of non-essential retailers will have to keep their doors closed under England's third nation-wide lockdown

The Joint Biosecurity Center today recommended lowering the Covid-19 alert

ALL YOUR LOCKDOWN QUESTIONS ANSWERED

Why is England going into lockdown again?

Cases caused by the new, more infectious variant of Covid-19 are surging rapidly in every part of the country. In the past week they have gone up by 30 per cent, and the number is 40 per cent higher than the peak of the first wave in April. Medical experts have warned the NHS could be overwhelmed in 21 days unless action is taken.

How long will it last?

Until mid-February. It will then be subject to a review.

Can I see family and friends?

The mixing of households indoors is not allowed outside of support bubbles. You can meet one other person outside your household for outdoor exercise.

If I am in a bubble with someone, can I still see them?

The support bubble system – where a person living alone can pair with another household – can continue. Childcare support bubbles are also still allowed.

Are schools closing?

Ja. All primary and secondary schools and colleges have to close and switch to online learning, except for the children of key workers and the most vulnerable. Universities must also stay closed. Early years providers, such as nurseries, and special schools can stay open.

Will GCSEs and A-levels be cancelled?

Boris Johnson said it would not be possible, or fair, for all exams to go ahead as normal this summer. Education Secretary Gavin Williamson will work to put alternative arrangements in place.

Will churches and other places of worship stay open?

Yes, they are allowed to open for individual prayer and communal worship.

Can I go on holiday in the UK or abroad?

No. Only essential travel is allowed.

Will playgrounds stay open?

Unlike the first lockdown, yes.

Can I move home?

Yes, you can still view houses and move home.

Can I let my cleaner or plumber into my house?

Yes, essential visits by tradesmen can continue.

Can I still exercise?

You can exercise outdoors with your household, your support bubble or alone with one other person from another household. Exercise should be limited to once a day and should be local, meaning you should not drive to a beauty spot.

Can I play golf or tennis?

No. Courses and courts must shut.

Is professional sport affected?

No. Elite sports that are Covid-secure and have bubble systems can continue.

Will there be extra financial support?

The furlough scheme will remain in place until April.

Can I leave my house to get a Covid vaccine?

Yes, you can leave your home for all medical appointments.

Will garden centres be open?

Ja.

Are restaurants open?

Not for eating inside, but cafes, restaurants, pubs and bars can serve takeaway food and non-alcoholic drinks until 11pm.

Will non-essential retailers such as clothes shops be open?

No. But click-and-collect services will be permitted to continue.

What about hairdressers and beauty salons?

No, they are among the non-essential shops that must close.

Can I go to work?

Only if you 'absolutely cannot' work from home. This means the construction industry can continue and key workers can continue to go to work.

Can I get married?

Only in exceptional circumstances, for example in cases where people are dying or have debilitating conditions.

I had to 'shield' last time – will I have to do this again?

Ja. Those who are clinically vulnerable and who were previously told to shield should stay at home and leave only for medical appointments or exercise. They will receive a letter shortly informing them about this.

Can I travel to my second home?

Travel is allowed only for essential work, shopping for necessities, exercise, caring for the vulnerable and medical reasons.

What shops are open?

Food shops, supermarkets, pharmacies, garden centres, building merchants and suppliers of building products and off-licences are allowed to remain open, along with market stalls selling essential retail.

Can I go to the bank?

Banks, building societies, post offices, short-term loan providers and money transfer businesses can stay open.

Can I take my pet to the vet?

Vets and retailers of products and food for the upkeep and welfare of animals can stay open, along with animal rescue centres

What about public facilities?

Car parks, public toilets and motorway service areas, along with outdoor playgrounds, outdoor parts of botanical gardens and heritage sites for exercise can stay open

Rishi Sunak today announced another £4.6billion of bailouts for lockdown-stricken businesses as economists warned of the 'colossal' hit from the surging pandemic.

The Chancellor declared that venues hammered by Boris Johnson's dramatic decision will get one-off grants of up to £9,000 to keep them afloat over the next seven weeks.

Some 600,000 premises across the UK are set to receive the cash, while another £594million is being pumped into a 'discretionary fund' to support other firms affected.

Mr Sunak also pointedly refused to rule out extending the massive furlough scheme again beyond the end of April, merely saying he would 'take stock' at the Budget in March.

However, businesses warned that the package is not enough, amid pressure for VAT and rates relief to be kept in place to stop a wave of bankruptcies.

The latest huge intervention came amid fears that the lockdown will slash GDP by up to 10 per cent in every month it is imposed – although the respected IFS think-tank said this morning that the impact might be lower as businesses have adapted since the first squeeze in March.

It will also raise alarm at the state of the government's finances, with IFS director Paul Johnson saying the scale of the economic damage was the worst 'in the whole of history'. Public sector borrowing could hit £400billion this year, with Mr Sunak already having warned of a reckoning later to balance the books.

In his speech to the nation, the Prime Minister said the previous tiers would have been enough to cope with Covid as it was originally, but the new variant – which is 50 per cent to 70 per cent more transmissible – was spreading in a 'frustrating and alarming' manner.

'As I speak to you tonight, our hospitals are under more pressure from Covid than at any time since the start of the pandemic,' he said.

Mr Johnson said that in England the number of Covid patients in hospitals has increased by nearly a third in the last week to almost 27,000 – some 40 per cent higher than the first peak in April.

On December 29 'more than 80,000 people tested positive for Covid across the UK', the number of deaths is up by 20 per cent over the last week 'and will sadly rise further'.

'With most of the country, or maybe under extreme measures, it's clear that we need to do more together to bring this new variant under control while our vaccines are rolled out,' he said.

'In England we must therefore go into a national lockdown which is tough enough to contain this variant.'

Mr Johnson said parents 'may reasonably ask why' decisions on schools were not taken 'sooner'.

'The answer is simply that we've been doing everything in our power to keep schools open because we know how important each day in education is to children's life chances,' he said.

'And I want to stress that the problem is not that schools are unsafe for children. It is still very unlikely that children will be severely affected by the new variant of Covid.

'The problem is that schools may nonetheless act as vectors for transmission, causing the virus to spread between households.'

Mr Johnson said the move on schools means 'it's not possible or fair for all exams to go ahead this summer, as normal'.

The PM added: 'We will provide extra support to ensure that pupils entitled to free school meals will continue to receive them while schools are closed, and we will distribute more devices to support remote education.'

The premier suggested England could 'steadily' move out of lockdown from mid-February – but he heavily caveated his optimism, in a sign that the crisis could drag on much longer.

'If our understanding of the virus doesn't change dramatically, once again, if the rollout of the vaccine programme continues to be successful, if deaths start to fall as the vaccine takes effect and – critically – if everyone plays their part by following the rules, then I hope we can steadily move out of lockdown, reopening schools after the February half-term and starting cautiously to move regions down the tiers,' Mr Johnson said.

'I must stress that even if we achieve this goal, there remains a time lag of two to three weeks from getting a jab to receiving immunity.

'And there will be a further time lag before the pressure on the NHS is lifted. So we should remain cautious about the timetable ahead.'

He rounded off his downbeat address by repeating the mantra from the first lockdown, 'stay at home, protect the NHS and save lives'.

'I want to say to everyone right across the UK that I know how tough this is,' he said.

'And I know how frustrated you are and I know that you have had more than enough of Government guidance about defeating this virus.

'But now, more than ever, we must pull together.'

He warned that 'the weeks ahead will be the hardest yet' but 'with every jab that goes into our arms, we are tilting the odds against Covid and in favour of the British people'.

'Thanks to the miracle of science not only is the end in sight but we know exactly how we will get there.'

Even the Scilly Isles has not escaped, shifting from Tier 1 straight to full lockdown.

In a round of interviews, Mr Gove said a review of the situation would happen in the February half-term.

'We hope we will be able to progressively lift restrictions after that but what I can't do is predict – nobody can predict – with accuracy exactly what we will be able to relax and when,' he told Sky News.

'What we do know is that the more effective our vaccination programme, the more people who are protected in that way, the easier it will be to lift these restrictions.'

Despite the ferocity of the new measures, scientists warned they still might not be enough to control the Covid variant.

Andrew Hayward, professor of infectious diseases epidemiology at University College London, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that the move 'will clearly save tens of thousands of lives'.

But he added: 'The threat we're facing is at least as bad as we were back in March.

'I think the virus is different and it may be that the lockdown measures we had are not enough so we need to learn from the new insights and new technologies, we need to learn from the last lockdown and particularly some of the things we saw.

'I think this time round we really need to use this lockdown to bear down on the virus in a way that can protect key workers – for example, we could be using the lateral flow (tests) and working with employers to offer regular testing to key workers.'

Meanwhile, police warned that enforcing the new national lockdown would put 'a lot of pressure' on officers whose numbers are already reduced by the coronavirus pandemic.

Rishi unveils ANOTHER £4.6bn bailout for stricken businesses

Rishi Sunak today announced another £4.6billion of bailouts for lockdown-stricken businesses as economists warned of the 'colossal' hit from the surging pandemic.

The Chancellor declared that venues hammered by Boris Johnson's dramatic decision will get one-off grants of up to £9,000 to keep them afloat over the next seven weeks.

Some 600,000 premises across the UK are set to receive the cash, while another £594million is being pumped into a 'discretionary fund' to support other firms affected.

Mr Sunak also pointedly refused to rule out extending the massive furlough scheme again beyond the end of April, merely saying he would 'take stock' at the Budget in March.

However, businesses warned that the package is not enough, amid pressure for VAT and rates relief to be kept in place to stop a wave of bankruptcies.

The latest huge intervention came amid fears that the lockdown will slash GDP by up to 10 per cent in every month it is imposed – although the respected IFS think-tank said this morning that the impact might be lower as businesses have adapted since the first squeeze in March.

It will also raise alarm at the state of the government's finances, with IFS director Paul Johnson saying the scale of the economic damage was the worst 'in the whole of history'. Public sector borrowing could hit £400billion this year, with Mr Sunak already having warned of a reckoning later to balance the books.

Ken Marsh, chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation – which represents front line officers in London, said some 1,300 were off sick or self-isolating in the capital.

His counterpart nationally, John Apter, wrote in the Daily Telegraph some forces were reporting 15 per cent of their staff off sick or self-isolating.

Mr Marsh urged the Government to place police officers on a priority list to receive coronavirus vaccines, saying requests to the Government so far were 'falling on deaf ears'.

Businesses voiced dismay at the new clampdown that threatens to wreak more havoc on the economy.

British Chambers of Commerce director general Adam Marshall said: 'Businesses will understand why the Prime Minister has felt compelled to act on the spiralling threat to public health, but they will be baffled and disappointed by the fact that he did not announce additional support for affected businesses alongside these new restrictions.'

Asked about how lockdown enforcement would affect officers, Mr Marsh said: 'It will obviously create a lot of pressure on us because we have a lot more officers off this time than we did back in March.

'Our numbers have rocketed in terms of officers with Covid and officers isolating and we envisage that getting worse.

'So the pressure is on my colleagues who are still out there to maintain the same level that they did before.'

Commenting on getting officers access to vaccines, he claimed: 'It would appear that policing has been airbrushed out of any conversation in relation to protecting my colleagues, which I find quite incredible considering they are on the front line.

'They are the one group of people other than the National Health Service that actually have to go to work and have to be out there with the public, every day, 24 hours a day.

'It's just amazing that no consideration whatsoever has been given to vaccinating police.'

Mr Apter, chairman of the Police Federation of England and Wales, has called for officers to be prioritised after society's most vulnerable groups and NHS workers have been given the jab.

He wrote in the Telegraph: 'Without the vaccine, there is a real danger that more officers will contract the virus.

'As growing numbers self-isolate or report sick with the virus, then the police service begins to struggle to do what the public fully expects of it.

'Some forces are already starting to report up to 15 per cent of their officers off sick or self-isolating. This is getting worse and is simply not sustainable.'

Starmer warns PM 'over-promising' on vaccines

Sir Keir Starmer sent a warning shot to Boris Johnson today over the Prime Minister's ambitious goal of vaccinating 13million Brits by mid-February, claiming it will be another example of No10 'over-promising and under-delivering' if it fails.

Labour's leader said drastically scaling up the vaccination programme — which has so far only inoculated a million people, despite launching a month ago — would be a 'struggle' and that there was 'no room for error'.

His comments came after Michael Gove today warned that lockdown will only start to be lifted gradually in March — and that the timeline depends on the Government meeting its inoculation goal.

But there are serious doubts about whether the target is achievable, given it has been slow to get off the ground and the NHS will need to juggle running the biggest immunisation programme in British history with battling the greatest crisis it has ever faced as Covid patients continue to pour into hospitals. Record numbers of staff absences and stringent infection control measures are also making the jobs of frontline health workers more difficult.

The NHS has refused to commit to the two million target because of potential vaccine supply shortages, staffing concerns and other logistical hurdles. There is also a suggestion that health bosses want to distance themselves from the Government's arbitrary targets, given that it has failed to hit numerous goals throughout the pandemic, including ramping up daily swabbing capacity and expanding NHS Test and Trace.

Mr Apter, whose organisation represents 130,000 officers, said the 'last thing the public want is to call 999 in their hour of need, only to find we are too short of officers to be able to respond'.

Emma McClarkin, chief executive of the British Beer & Pub Association, said: 'A third lockdown is yet another blow to our sector. Particularly after it has faced an abysmally quiet Christmas and New Year's, which saw many pubs remain closed over what is meant to be their busiest time of the year.

'The announcement today adds to the woes of pubs as it shows they are a long way from reopening properly. The road to recovery for the pub sector just got longer.'

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the Government should have gone further by extending the rules on wearing face masks to cover busy outdoor areas and toughening up controls at the borders.

'This announcement by the Government of a full national lockdown was inevitable,' Mr Khan said.

'It is unclear why it took Boris Johnson so long to reach this conclusion.'

The latest infection tally meant the UK has passed the milestone of 50,000 infections every day for a week, suggesting that the easing of restrictions at Christmas helped fuel the outbreak.

Department of Health chiefs also posted 407 more deaths, up just 14 per cent on the figure recorded last week.

However, it can take several weeks for infected patients to become seriously ill and succumb to the disease, meaning deaths have not yet peaked and will continue to increase.

The UK recorded nearly 1,000 deaths twice in the past week, with the gruesome tolls slipping since the darkest days of spring.

Nicola Sturgeon announced a drastic crackdown in the Scottish Parliament on Monday afternoon, with a legally-enforced stay at home order from midnight and schools north of the border set to stay closed until February.

Mr Johnson confirmed yesterday morning that 'tougher' measures were coming despite the optimism sparked by the first Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine doses being administered – although at that point he appeared to hint he would prefer to stick with the Tier system in England.

Streets and city centres were quiet as Britons digested the new restrictions being placed on their lives. PIctured, Waterloo station in London

Streets and city centres were quiet as Britons digested the new restrictions being placed on their lives. PIctured, Waterloo station in London

Traffic was relatively light in many parts of London this morning, although the new rules have yet to come into force legally. Pictured, the A40 Marylebone flyover heading into central London

Traffic was relatively light in many parts of London this morning, although the new rules have yet to come into force legally. Pictured, the A40 Marylebone flyover heading into central London

Lockdown 3: what 'non-essential businesses must close?

Non-essential retail, such as clothing and homeware stores, vehicle showrooms (excluding rental), betting shops, tailors, tobacco and vape shops, electronic goods and mobile phone shops, auction houses (except for auctions of livestock or agricultural equipment) and market stalls selling non-essential goods. (These venues can continue to be able to operate click-and-collect off-premises, and delivery services).

Hospitality venues such as cafes, restaurants, pubs, bars and social clubs (they can remain open for takeaway and delivery of food and non-alcoholic drinks).

Accommodation such as hotels, hostels, guest houses and campsites,

Leisure and sports facilities such as leisure centres and gyms, swimming pools, sports courts,fitness and dance studios, riding arenas at riding centres, climbing walls, and golf courses.

Entertainment venues such as theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums and galleries, casinos, amusement arcades, bingo halls, bowling alleys, skating rinks, go-karting venues, indoor play and soft play centres and areas (including inflatable parks and trampolining centres), circuses, fairgrounds, funfairs, water parks and theme parks

Animal attractions (such as zoos, safari parks, aquariums, and wildlife reserves)

Indoor attractions at venues such as botanical gardens, stately homes and landmarks –  though outdoor grounds can stay open for exercise.

Personal care facilities such as hair, beauty, tanning and nail salons. Tattoo studios, spas, massage parlors, body and skin piercing services must also be closed. They can also not be done in private homes.

Community centres and halls.

SAGE had cautioned that it is probably impossible to control the new coronavirus variant while they remain open – although experts say a total shutdown still might not be enough to bring the 'R' reproduction rate below one.

Michael Gove held a conference call with the First Ministers from the four nations to coordinate strategies. But in a sign of splits, Wales has said it will push ahead with reopening schools over the next fortnight unless there is new evidence about the variant strain.

Earlier, ex-health secretary Jeremy Hunt joined demands from Labour and Tory MPs for an immediate national squeeze with schools and borders shut and a ban on all household mixing.

Mr Hunt warned that the mutant Covid had put pressure on the NHS compared to normal winters and the government could not afford to wait another day.

Mr Hunt posted on Twitter: 'To those arguing winter is always like this in the NHS: you are wrong. I faced four major winter crises as Health Sec, and the situation is now worse than any. & # 39;

Mr Hunt said the "main lesson" from the pandemic was that if countries "act early and decisively", countries can "save lives and get their economies back to normal faster".

"We can't afford to wait: all schools should be closed, international travel stopped, the mix of households limited and the animal system checked so that the highest level really lowers the infection rate," said Hunt.

"The good news is that unlike before, these restrictions will be limited to around 12 weeks to get the vaccine to those most susceptible to Covid. So there is light at the end of the tunnel."

Mr Hunt was among a growing band of Conservative MPs, including ex-No10 adviser Neil O'Brien, urging emergency steps to tackle the coronavirus surge.

Labour has also been pushing for a squeeze, with Sadiq Khan saying Mr Hunt was 'spot on'.

Previously, Matt Hancock had suggested that the first step would be to escalate even more parts of the country into Tier 4. Tier 3 seemed unable to hold back the more contagious version of the deadly disease.

He insisted that part of the problem was caused by people who did not obey the rules and urged some MPs to give the police more powers.

But there were questions about how much more impact extending the coverage of Tier 4 could have, given three-quarters of England is already subject to the harshest bracket, where only essential shops such as supermarkets are allowed to open and people are meant to stay at home.

Dr Yvonne Doyle, medical director for Public Health England (PHE), said the latest daily figures were a 'bitter warning' about the threat.

BORIS JOHNSON'S LOCKDOWN ANNOUNCEMENT IN FULL

'Since the pandemic began last year, the whole United Kingdom has been engaged in a great national effort to fight Covid.

'And there is no doubt that in fighting the old variant of the virus, our collective efforts were working and would have continued to work.

'But we now have a new variant of the virus. It has been both frustrating and alarming to see the speed with which the new variant is spreading.

'Our scientists have confirmed this new variant is between 50% and 70% more transmissible – that means you are much, much more likely to catch the virus and to pass it on.

'As I speak to you tonight, our hospitals are under more pressure from Covid than at any time since the start of the pandemic.

'In England alone, the number of Covid patients in hospitals has increased by nearly a third in the last week, to almost 27,000.

'That number is 40% higher than the first peak in April. On 29 December, more than 80,000 people tested positive for Covid across the UK – a new record.

'The number of deaths is up by 20% over the last week and will sadly rise further. My thoughts are with all those who have lost loved ones.

'With most of the country already under extreme measures, it is clear that we need to do more, together, to bring this new variant under control while our vaccines are rolled out.

'In England, we must therefore go into a national lockdown which is tough enough to contain this variant.

'That means the Government is once again instructing you to stay at home.

'You may only leave home for limited reasons permitted in law, such as to shop for essentials, to work if you absolutely cannot work from home, to exercise, to seek medical assistance such as getting a Covid test, or to escape domestic abuse.

'The full details on what you can and can't do will be available at gov.uk/coronavirus.

'If you are clinically extremely vulnerable, we are advising you to begin shielding again and you will shortly receive a letter about what this means for you.

'And because we now have to do everything we possibly can to stop the spread of the disease, primary schools, secondary schools and colleges across England must move to remote provision from tomorrow, except for vulnerable children and the children of key workers.

'Everyone will still be able to access early years settings such as nurseries.

'We recognise that this will mean it is not possible or fair for all exams to go ahead this summer as normal. The Education Secretary will work with Ofqual to put in place alternative arrangements.

'We will provide extra support to ensure that pupils entitled to free school meals will continue to receive them while schools are closed, and we'll distribute more devices to support remote education.

'I completely understand the inconvenience and distress this late change will cause millions of parents and pupils up and down the country.

'Parents whose children were in school today may reasonably ask why we did not take this decision sooner.

'The answer is simply that we have been doing everything in our power to keep schools open, because we know how important each day in education is to children's life chances.

'And I want to stress that the problem is not that schools are unsafe for children – children are still very unlikely to be severely affected by even the new variant of Covid.

'The problem is that schools may nonetheless act as vectors for transmission, causing the virus to spread between households.

'Today the United Kingdom's chief medical officers have advised that the country should move to alert level 5, meaning that if action is not taken NHS capacity may be overwhelmed within 21 days.

'Of course, there is one huge difference compared to last year. We are now rolling out the biggest vaccination programme in our history.

'So far, we in the UK have vaccinated more people than the rest of Europe combined.

'With the arrival today of the UK's own Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine, the pace of vaccination is accelerating.

'I can share with you tonight the NHS's realistic expectations for the vaccination programme in the coming weeks.

'By the middle of February, if things go well and with a fair wind in our sails, we expect to have offered the first vaccine dose to everyone in the four top priority groups identified by the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation.

'That means vaccinating all residents in a care home for older adults and their carers, everyone over the age of 70, all frontline health and social care workers, and everyone who is clinically extremely vulnerable.

'If we succeed in vaccinating all those groups, we will have removed huge numbers of people from the path of the virus.

'And of course, that will eventually enable us to lift many of the restrictions we have endured for so long.

'I must stress that even if we achieve this goal, there remains a time lag of two to three weeks from getting a jab to receiving immunity.

'And there will be a further time lag before the pressure on the NHS is lifted. So we should remain cautious about the timetable ahead.

'But if our understanding of the virus doesn't change dramatically once again…

'If the rollout of the vaccine programme continues to be successful…

'If deaths start to fall as the vaccine takes effect…

'And, critically, if everyone plays their part by following the rules…

'Then I hope we can steadily move out of lockdown, reopening schools after the February half-term and starting, cautiously, to move regions down the tiers.

'I want to say to everyone right across the United Kingdom that I know how tough this is, I know how frustrated you are, I know that you have had more than enough of government guidance about defeating this virus.

'But now more than ever, we must pull together.

'You should follow the new rules from now, and they will become law in the early hours of Wednesday morning. Parliament will meet – largely remotely – later that day.

'I know that the devolved administrations in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland share my conviction this is a pivotal moment and they're taking similar steps.

'The weeks ahead will be the hardest yet but I really do believe that we are entering the last phase of the struggle.

'Because with every jab that goes into our arms, we are tilting the odds against Covid and in favour of the British people.

'And, thanks to the miracle of science, not only is the end in sight and we know exactly how we will get there.

'But for now, I am afraid, you must once again stay at home, protect the NHS and save lives.

'Thank you all very much.'

Who has to work from home now and how strictly will it be enforced?

Boris Johnson plunged the country into a third national lockdown ordering everyone to work from home if they can.

However, the criteria on who can stay out of the office has caused some confusion with the exception applying only to people who 'absolutely cannot work from home'.

The Government's official website states this category includes – but is not limited to – 'people who work within critical national infrastructure, construction or manufacturing that require in-person attendance'.

Roles such as these – which include water service and telecoms workers – are 'essential to keeping the country operating and supporting sectors and employers', guidance states.

Those working in childcare or education are deemed to be providing an essential service, meaning they should continue to go into work.

People who need to work in others' homes – such as nannies, cleaners or tradespeople – are also able to do so.

To facilitate working from home, employees are encouraged to provide both IT equipment and the services to enable remote working.

Those who are out of the house without a 'reasonable excuse' – including those who are working outside when it is not essential – can be slapped with a £200 fine.

This figure can increase to up to £6,400 for repeat offenders.

'The continuous rise in cases and deaths should be a bitter warning for us all. We must not forget the basics – the lives of our friends and family depend on it,' she said.

Speaking during a visit to Chase Farm Hospital in north London yesterday morning, Mr Johnson warned of 'tough tough' weeks to come.

He added, "If you look at the numbers, there is no question that we need to take stricter measures and we will announce these in due course."

Mr Johnson tried to strike a positive note, promising there will be a 'massive ramp up' in vaccination numbers.

Before Mr Johnson acted, Ms Sturgeon announced yesterday that Scotland will be plunged back into a national coronavirus lockdown from midnight.

The SNP chairman said the new policy, which will last through January, will include a legally enforceable stay at home rule.

Exercise and important travel are the only reasons people are allowed to leave their homes.

The scheduled reopening of schools on January 18 will also be postponed to February 1 at the earliest, while workers are instructed to work from home wherever possible.

The rules for outdoor gatherings are tightened so that a maximum of two people from two households can meet.

In the meantime, the places of worship are closed from this Friday, but weddings and funerals are still allowed to take place.

A maximum of 20 people can attend funeral services and a maximum of five people can attend weddings.

Ms. Sturgeon said the hard new curbs were necessary because of the "soaring" rate of infection north of the border, as she warned the lockdown could be extended beyond January if necessary.

The measures effectively mean a return to the restrictions put in place during the UK's first lockdown in late March last year.

All of mainland Scotland is already in the top tier of the Covid-19 rules, but case numbers have led Ms. Sturgeon to take more drastic action after 2,464 new cases were announced yesterday.

What you can and can't do during national lockdown: Government guidelines in full

You have to stay home. The most important action we can all take is to stay home to protect the NHS and save lives.

You should follow these instructions immediately. The law will be updated to reflect these new rules.

Leaving home

You are not allowed to walk or be outside your home unless you have to. You can leave the house to:

  • Buy for basic needs, for you or a vulnerable person
  • Go to work, or do volunteer or community service when you cannot adequately do so from your home
  • If you are exercising with your household (or support bladder) or someone else, it should be limited to once a day and you shouldn't travel outside of your area.
  • Hit your support or childcare bubble if necessary, but only if you are legally entitled to create one
  • Seek medical attention or avoid injury, illness, or the risk of harm (including domestic violence).
  • attend training or childcare – for those entitled

Universities, elementary and secondary schools will only remain open to vulnerable children and children of critical workers. All other children study until the half year of February. The settings for the first few years remain open.

The university offering will remain online until mid-February for all but future courses for critical workers.

If you leave home for a valid reason, you should always stay in the village, town, or part of the town where you live. You can leave your region for any reason permitted by law; B. because of work.

If you are at extreme clinical risk, only go out for medical appointments, exercise, or when it is important to go out. You shouldn't take part in work

Meet others

You can't leave home to socialize with someone who you don't live with or who you're not in a support bubble with (unless you are legally allowed to form one).

You can exercise alone, with someone else, or with your household or your support bladder.

You shouldn't meet anyone else you don't live with or with whom you've formed a support bubble unless there is a valid reason why you can.

Stay 2 meters away from people who are not in your household.

Detailed instructions on national blocking

Who this guide is for

These instructions are aimed at people who are fit and healthy. There is additional advice for people who are clinically extremely susceptible to coronavirus and for households with possible or confirmed coronavirus infection. If you are at extreme clinical risk, avoid going to work, school, college, or university and limiting the amount of time you spend outside the home. You should only go out on medical appointments, exercise, or when it is important.

Hands. Face. Room.

About 1 in 3 people with coronavirus have no symptoms and could spread it without realizing it.

Remember – 'hands. Face. Space. & # 39;

  • Hands – Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds
  • Face – Wear face covering indoors where social distancing can be difficult and you will come into contact with people you would not normally meet
  • Space – If possible, stay 2 meters away from people you do not live with, or 1 meter if additional precautions have been taken (such as wearing face coverings).

At all costs, follow the directions to meet others safely.

If you can leave the house

You must not leave your home or be outside your home unless you have a "reasonable excuse". This is regulated by law. The police can take action against you if you leave the house without a “reasonable apology” and impose a fine (permanent complaint).

You can get a fixed penalty of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses.

A "reasonable apology" includes:

  • Work – You may only leave home for work if it is inappropriate for you to do your work from home, including but not limited to those who work in critical national infrastructure, construction, or manufacturing, and require personal presence
  • Volunteering – You can also leave home to do volunteer or community service.
  • Essential Activities – You can leave home to buy things in stores or get services. You can also leave home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person, or someone who is self-isolating.
  • Education and Childcare – You can only leave home for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children that you are eligible to attend. Access to education and activities for school-age children is limited. You can find more information on education and childcare here. People can continue existing arrangements for contact between parents and children in whom they are separated. This includes childcare bubbles.
  • Meeting with Others and Care – You can leave home to visit people in your support bubble (if you are legally allowed to form one), to informally care for children under the age of 14 under a child care bubble (e.g. to To enable parents to work and not allow social contact between adults), to look after disabled or vulnerable people, to provide emergency aid, to participate in a self-help group (with up to 15 people) or to take a care break if this care is for a vulnerable person or a person with a disability or is taking a short break in relation to a cared child.
  • Exercise – You can continue to exercise alone, with someone else, or with your household or support bladder. This should be limited to once per day and you shouldn't travel outside of your area. You should keep social distance. See train and meet other people.
  • Medical Reasons – You can leave your home for medical reasons, including a COVID-19 test, for medical appointments and emergencies.
  • Harm and Compassionate Visits – You can leave the house to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness, or to avoid the risk of harm (such as domestic violence). You can also leave the house to visit someone who is dying, someone in a nursing home (if this is permitted under the guidance of the nursing home), a hospice or hospital, or to accompany them to a doctor's appointment.
  • Animal welfare reasons – You can leave your home for animal welfare reasons, e.g. B. To contact a veterinary service for advice or treatment.
  • Communal Worship and Life Events – You can leave your home to attend or attend a place of worship for communal worship, funeral or event related to a death, burial site or memorial garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony. You should follow instructions on how to use places of worship safely and should not mix with anyone outside of your household or support bubble when visiting a place of worship. Weddings, funerals, and religious, belief-based, or memorial services associated with the death of an individual are all subject to attendance restrictions, and weddings and civil ceremonies are exceptional.

There are other reasonable excuses. For example, you may leave your home to comply with legal obligations or to engage in activities related to buying, selling, renting or renting residential property, or when it is reasonable to vote in an election or referendum.

Train and meet other people

You should minimize the amount of time you spend outside your home.

It is against the law to socialize with family or friends unless they are part of your household or your support bubble. You can only leave your home to play sports and not for recreation or recreation (e.g. a picnic or social gathering). This should be limited to once per day and you shouldn't travel outside of your area.

You can exercise in a public place outdoors:

  • of yourself
  • with the people you live with
  • with your support bubble (if you are legally entitled to create one)
  • in a childcare bubble where childcare is offered
  • or, if you are alone, with 1 person from another household
  • Public outdoor spaces are:
  • Parks, beaches, publicly accessible landscape, forests
  • public gardens (whether or not you pay to enter)
  • the site of a cultural heritage
  • playgrounds

Outdoor sports venues, including tennis courts, golf courses, and swimming pools, must be closed.

When around other people, stay 2 meters away from people outside your household – that is, the people you live with – or your support bubble. If this is not possible, maintain a distance of 1 meter with additional precautions (e.g. wearing a face covering).

They have to be used in many indoor spaces, e.g. For example, wear face-covering in shops or places of worship that remain open and on public transport unless you are exempt. That's the law. Read the instructions for face coverings.

Support and child care bubbles

You must meet certain eligibility requirements in order to create a support or childcare bubble. This means that not everyone can form a bubble.

A support bubble is a support network that connects two households. You can only form a support bubble with another household of any size if you meet the eligibility requirements.

It is against the law to create a support bubble if you don't follow these rules.

You're allowed to leave home to visit (and stay with) your support bubble. However, if you are creating a support bubble, it is best if it happens with a household that lives locally. This will prevent the virus from spreading to an area where more people are infected.

If you live in a household with anyone under the age of 14, you can create a childcare bubble. This allows friends or family members from another household to offer informal childcare.

You are not allowed to socialize with your child care bubble and are allowed to avoid seeing members of your child care and support bubbles at the same time.

There are separate instructions for support bladders and childcare bladders.

Where and when you can meet in larger groups

There are still circumstances in which you can meet other people outside of your household, childcare or support bubble in larger groups. However, this should not be for socializing and should only be for permissible purposes. A full list of these circumstances is included in the regulations and includes:

  • for work or for voluntary or charitable services, if this is not reasonable from home. This may include working in other people's homes, for example, nannies, cleaners, social workers supporting children and families, or tradespeople, if necessary. See Instructions for Working Safely in Other People's Homes. If a work meeting doesn't need to be in a private home or garden, it shouldn't be. For example, although you can meet a personal trainer, do so in an outdoor public place.
  • in a child care bubble (only for child care purposes)
  • If authorized, use these services for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children. Access to educational and childcare facilities is restricted. You can find more information on education and childcare here.
  • for agreements in which children do not live in the same household as their parents or legal guardians
  • To enable contact between birth parents and cared for children as well as between cared for siblings
  • for potential adoptive parents to meet a child or children who can be placed with them
  • to enable or facilitate the placement or relief of a child or children in the care of another through social services
  • for birth partners
  • Providing emergency assistance and preventing injury or illness or the risk of injury (including domestic violence)
  • to see someone dying
  • to fulfill a legal obligation, such as B. participation in a court or jury service
  • for meetings in prisons or immigration detention centers
  • To provide care or support for vulnerable people or to give a caregiver a break
  • for a wedding or an equivalent ceremony in exceptional cases and only for up to 6 people
  • for funerals – up to 30 people. Wakes and other related ceremonial events can continue in a group of up to 6 people.
  • visiting someone at home who is dying, visiting someone receiving treatment in a hospital, hospice, or nursing home, or taking a family member or friend to a doctor's appointment
  • for elite athletes (and their coaches if required, or parents / guardians if under 18) – or for those who are on an official elite sports path – to compete and train
  • to facilitate a move

Support groups that need to be delivered in person can continue with up to 15 participants formally organized to provide mutual help, therapy, or other forms of support. However, they must take place in a room other than a private household.

Generally, if a group includes someone for whom an exception applies (such as someone who works or volunteers), they are not counted as part of the gathering limit. This means, for example, that a trader can go into a household without exceeding the limit when he is there for work, and the officer at a wedding would not count towards the limit.

If you break the rules

The police can take action against you if you meet in larger groups. This includes breaking up illegal gatherings and imposing fines (fixed criminal charges).

You can get a fixed penalty of £ 200 for the first offense, which doubles to a maximum of £ 6,400 for further offenses. If you hold or are involved in an illegal gathering of over 30 people, the police can impose a fine of £ 10,000.

Protection of people at risk from coronaviruses

If you are clinically prone, you may be at greater risk of developing serious illness from the coronavirus. There is additional advice for those who are extremely clinically susceptible to coronavirus. Those who are at extreme clinical risk should not go to work, school, college, or university and limit the amount of time they spend outside the home. You should only go out on medical appointments, exercise, or when it is important.

travel

You are not allowed to leave your home unless you have a reasonable excuse (e.g. for work or educational purposes). If you do need to travel, stay local – that is, you shouldn't travel outside of your village, town, or part of a town you live in – and try to limit the total number of trips you make to reduce. The list of reasons why you can leave your home and region includes, among others:

  • work where you cannot reasonably work from home
  • Access to education and caring responsibilities
  • Visit the ones in your support bubble – or your childcare bubble for childcare
  • Visiting a hospital, family doctor and other medical appointments or visits where you have had an accident or are worried about your health
  • Buying the goods or services that you need, but should be near you wherever possible
  • Exercise outdoors. If possible, this should be done on site. However, if necessary, you can travel a short distance near you to do so (e.g. to gain access to an open space).
  • Caring for and exercising an animal or veterinary services

If you need to travel, walk, or bike, plan ahead and avoid busy times and public transit routes. This is a great way to practice social distancing while traveling.

Avoid car sharing with anyone outside your household or support bubble. See the instructions for car sharing.

If you need public transportation, be sure to follow the safer tour guides.

Trips abroad

You can only travel internationally or within the UK if you have a legal reason to leave for the first time. In addition, you should consider the public health advice in the country you are visiting.

If you need to travel overseas (and it is permitted by law, e.g. because it is a job), you should check the rules that apply, even if you are returning to a place where you have previously visited the destination and travel advice of the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO).

UK residents currently abroad do not need to return home immediately. However, you should check with your airline or tour operator about return shipping arrangements.

Foreigners are subject to the rules for staying at home. You should not travel abroad unless permitted. That means you are not allowed to go on vacation.

When you visit the UK, you can return home. You should check whether there are any restrictions in place at your destination.

Staying away from home overnight

You cannot leave your home or the place where you are living for holidays or overnight stays unless you have a reasonable excuse for doing so. This means that holidays in the UK and abroad are not allowed.

This includes staying in a second home or caravan, if that is not your primary residence. This includes staying with someone you don't live with unless they're in your support bubble.

You can stay away from home overnight if you:

  • visit your support bubble
  • cannot return to their primary residence
  • need accommodation when moving
  • need accommodation to attend a funeral or similar memorial service
  • require accommodation for work or voluntary service
  • are a child who needs housing for school or care
  • are homeless, seeking asylum, a vulnerable person seeking refuge, or when escaping harm (including domestic violence)
  • are a top athlete or their support staff or parent if the athlete is under 18 and needs to be outside the home for training or competition

If you are already on vacation, you should return to your home as soon as possible.

Providers of guest accommodation such as hotels, B & Bs and caravan parks can remain open for reasons specified by law, e.g. B. If guests cannot return to their main residence, use this guest accommodation as their main residence and need accommodation while moving. are self-isolating as required by law or would otherwise become homeless due to the closure of the accommodation. For a full list of reasons, see the UK Closing Guidelines for Certain Businesses and Venues.

Accommodation providers are also encouraged to work with local authorities to provide shelter to vulnerable groups, including the homeless.

Go to work

You are only allowed to leave home to work if you cannot adequately work from home.

When people cannot work from home – including, but not limited to, people working in critical national infrastructure, construction or manufacturing – they should continue to travel to work. This is essential to keep the country running and to support sectors and employers.

Public sector workers engaged in essential services such as childcare or education should continue to work.

You can do so wherever you have to work in other people's homes – for example, for nannies, cleaners, or traders. Otherwise, avoid meeting for work in a home or garden where safe COVID-19 measures may not be in place.

Employers and employees should discuss their working arrangements, and employers should take all possible steps to make it easier for their employees to work from home, including providing adequate IT and equipment to enable remote working.

The risk of transmission can be significantly reduced if the COVID-19 security guidelines are followed closely. People at higher risk should be given special consideration.

Go to school, college and university

Universities, primary schools (from reception) and secondary schools remain open to vulnerable children and children of critical workers. All other children study until the half year of February.

Under these circumstances, we do not believe it is possible that all summer exams will go ahead as planned. We will accordingly work with Ofqual to consult quickly and make alternative arrangements that will enable students to make fair progress.

Public exams and professional assessments scheduled to take place in January are proceeding as planned.

Universities

Those undergraduate and graduate students studying for the following courses should resume face-to-face learning as planned and be tested twice upon arrival or self-isolated for ten days:

  • Medicine & Dentistry
  • Topics related to medicine / health
  • Veterinary medicine
  • Training (initial teacher training)
  • Social work
  • Courses that require Professional, Legal and Regulatory (PSRB) Assessment and / or Compulsory Activities scheduled for January that cannot be postponed (your university will notify you if this applies to you).

Students who are not studying these courses should stay where they are wherever possible and begin their semester online, as allowed by their university until at least mid-February. This includes students from other practical courses not on the list above.

We have already published guidelines for universities and students on how to safely return to higher education in the spring semester. This guide outlines how we will support higher education providers so that students who have to return after the winter break can do so as safely as possible.

If you live at a university, you shouldn't switch back and forth between your permanent home and your dorm during semester time.

For those students eligible for face-to-face tuition, you can meet in groups larger than your budget as part of your formal education or training if necessary. Students should expect to follow the directions and restrictions. You should socially distance yourself from someone you don't live with wherever possible.

childcare

There are several ways in which parents and carers can still access childcare:

  • Settings for early years (including kindergartens and child minders) remain open
  • Children at risk and children of critical workers can continue to use registered childcare, child minders and other childcare activities (including all-round care).
  • Parents can create a childcare bubble with another household for informal childcare purposes if the child is under 14 years old. This is mainly used to enable parents to work and should not be used to enable social contact between adults
  • Some households will also benefit from a support bubble
  • Nannies can continue to provide services, including at home

Nursing home visits

Visits to nursing homes can be done with provisions such as large screens, visiting capsules, or behind windows. Internal visits with close contact are not permitted. Visits are not permitted in the event of an outbreak.

You should read the guides on Visiting Nursing Homes During COVID-19 to find out how visits should be conducted. Residents cannot meet people when they visit the house (e.g. to visit their relatives in the family home). There are separate guidelines for those who lead supported lives.

Weddings, civil partnerships, church services and funerals

Weddings, civil wedding ceremonies and funerals are permitted with strict attendance restrictions and may only take place in safe locations from COVID-19 or in public outdoor areas, unless there are exceptional circumstances.

Funerals can be attended by a maximum of 30 people. Linked religious, faith-based or memorial events such as stone settings and ash scattering can also be continued with up to 6 participants. Those who work are not taken into account within these limits. Social distancing between people who do not live together or share a support bubble should be maintained.

Weddings and civil weddings may only take place with up to 6 people. Who works is not included. These should only take place in exceptional cases, e.g. For example, in an urgent marriage in which one of the marriages is critically ill and not expected to recover or undergo debilitating treatment or life-changing surgery.

Places of worship

You can visit places of worship for worship. However, you are not allowed to talk to anyone outside your household or the support bubble. You should maintain strict social distancing at all times.

You should follow national guidelines for the safe use of places of worship.

Sport and physical activity

Gyms and sports facilities remain closed. Outdoor sports fields, outdoor gyms, golf courses, outdoor pools, archery / driving / shooting ranges, and horse riding areas must also be closed. Organized outdoor sports for disabled people may continue.

Move home

You can still move home. People outside of your household or support bubble should only help with the move if absolutely necessary.

Real estate and rental companies as well as moving companies can continue to operate. If you want to move, you can go to property viewings.

Follow national guidelines for moving home safely, including advice on social distancing, breathing in fresh air, and wearing a face covering.

Financial support

Wherever you live, you may be able to get financial help

Companies and venues

Companies and venues that are about to close

To reduce social contact, regulations mandate that some businesses shut down and place restrictions on some businesses' supply of goods and services. The full list of businesses required to close can be found in the UK Closure Guidelines for Certain Businesses and Venues, but includes:

  • Non-essential retail stores such as clothing and homeware stores, vehicle showrooms (except for rental), betting shops, tailors, tobacco and vape shops, electronic goods and cellphone shops, auction houses (except for auctions of livestock or farm equipment). and market stalls selling non-essential goods. These venues can continue to provide click-and-collect services (where goods are pre-ordered and picked up off site) and delivery services.
  • Eating places such as cafes, restaurants, pubs, bars and clubs; with the exception of the provision of food and non-alcoholic beverages to take away (until 11 p.m.), click-and-collect and transit. All food and drinks (including alcohol) can still be provided by delivery.
  • Accommodation such as hotels, hostels, guest houses and campsites, except in certain circumstances, e.g. For example, when this is a person's primary residence, when the person cannot return home to provide shelter or support for the homeless, or when it is important to stay there for work
  • Leisure and sports facilities such as leisure centers and fitness studios, swimming pools, sports fields, fitness and dance studios, riding arenas in riding centers, climbing walls and golf courses.
  • Entertainment venues such as theaters, concert halls, cinemas, museums and galleries, casinos, arcades, bingo halls, bowling alleys, ice rinks, go-karting venues, indoor game and soft play centers and areas (including inflatable parks and trampoline centers), circuses, Exhibition centers, fairs, water parks and theme parks
  • Animal attractions (such as zoos, safari parks, aquariums, and game reserves)
  • Indoor attractions at locations like botanical gardens, historic homes, and landmarks must also be closed, although the outdoor area of ​​these premises may remain open for outdoor exercise.
  • Personal care facilities such as hair, beauty, tanning and nail salons. Tattoo studios, spas, massage parlors, body and skin piercing services must also be closed. These services should not be performed in other people's homes
  • Community centers and halls must be closed, with the exception of a limited number of exempted activities as noted below. Libraries can also remain open to provide access to IT and digital services – for example, for people who do not have them at home – and for click-and-collect services

Some of these shops and locations are also allowed to be open for a small number of optional activities. For a full list of exemptions, see the UK Closure Guidelines for Certain Businesses and Venues, including:

  • Education and training – so schools can use sports, recreational and community facilities if this is part of their normal provision
  • Childcare purposes and supervised activities for the eligible children
  • Hosting blood donation meetings and food banks
  • to provide medical treatment
  • for top athletes for training and competitions (in indoor and outdoor sports facilities) and for professional dancers and choreographers for work (in fitness and dance studios)
  • for training and rehearsals without an audience (in theaters and concert halls)
  • for the purpose of film and television recordings

Companies and venues that can stay open

Other companies and venues are allowed to remain open as per COVID-19 security guidelines. Companies that offer important goods and services can remain open. The full list of these companies can be found in the UK Closure Guidelines for Certain Businesses and Venues, but includes:

  • Major retail stores such as grocery stores, supermarkets, pharmacies, garden centers, builders and suppliers of building products and off-licenses
  • Market stalls selling major retail stores may also remain open
  • Companies that provide repair services can also remain open where they primarily provide repair services
  • Petrol stations, automatic (but not manual) car washes, vehicle repair and MOT services, bike shops, and taxi and vehicle rentals
  • Banks, building societies, post offices, short-term loan providers and money transfer companies
  • Undertaker
  • Laundromats and dry cleaners
  • medical and dental services
  • Veterinarians and retailers of products and food for the maintenance and welfare of animals
  • Animal rescue centers, boarding schools, and zookeepers (can still be used for animal welfare rather than aesthetic purposes)
  • Agricultural products shops
  • Shops to support mobility and disability
  • Storage and distribution facilities
  • Parking lots, public toilets and motorway service stations
  • Outdoor playgrounds
  • Outdoor areas of botanical gardens and heritage sites to exercise
  • Places of worship
  • Crematoriums and burial sites

Public services

Most of the public services continue and you can go out to visit them. These include:

  • the NHS and medical services such as family doctors and dentists. We support the NHS in providing urgent and non-urgent services safely, and it is important that anyone who believes they need any medical care should come forward and seek help
  • Jobcentre Plus websites
  • Courts and probation
  • Registry offices
  • Passport and Visa services
  • Services to victims
  • Waste or recycling centers
  • getting a MOT if you have to drive when you leave home legally

.(tagsToTranslate)dailymail(t)news(t)Gavin Williamson