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Northeast England faces the Covid curfew on FRIDAY


New coronavirus restrictions are expected to be enforced in the northeast, including pubs that close at 10 p.m. and households banned from being in contact with anyone outside their home.

The new rules are expected to go into effect shortly after midnight on Friday September 18 after the number of Covid-19 cases in the region rose dramatically.

Nick Forbes, Chairman of Newcastle City Council, said "additional, temporary" measures are planned to prevent another full lockdown. He said he expected Health Secretary Matt Hancock to make an announcement Thursday morning.

The restrictions are reported to apply to Newcastle, Northumberland, North Tyneside, South Tyneside, Gateshead, County Durham and Sunderland, which have increased in all cases according to the latest weekly rates.

The lockdown includes a curfew on pubs, restaurants, and other licensed spaces at 10:00 p.m. According to ChronicleLive, people are prohibited from interacting with anyone outside their household.

Community Secretary Robert Jenrick told ITV's Peston on Wednesday, “The number of cases has grown rapidly in many parts of the country, particularly the United States, and it has been decided that further restrictions will be imposed there.

“And tomorrow there will be a full announcement, and so people in this part of the country should pay attention to it. And the measures will come into play at midnight on Thursday evening.

"A full briefing will be provided to everyone including councilors and the business community later in the day."

Other possible restrictions are that people are instructed not to go on vacation with different households and that viewers are advised not to visit sports venues.

Nursing home visits might be restricted to essential visitors and it is recommended that public transport be avoided at peak times other than essential journeys and car sharing is avoided.

Mr Forbes tweeted, "Some additional, temporary restrictions are planned to prevent another full lockdown."

A Twitter user asked when the announcement would be made, adding that the "uncertainty creates a lot of fear for people".

He replied, “We are waiting for the government to confirm the final version of the regulations. I'm expecting an announcement from the Minister of Health tomorrow at 11 a.m. & # 39;

The latest figures show that Newcastle saw its weekly rate jump sharply from 51.2 to 64.1, with 194 new cases in the seven days ending September 13.

It does so after local measures such as Greater Manchester and Birmingham are in place to counter rising infection rates. And ministers and government officials insist they stand ready to take more draconian steps to stop the spread, despite a wave of criticism.

In other coronavirus developments today:

  • Matt Hancock and Boris Johnson have been warned that the testing fiasco is on the verge of de facto lockdown of the country as schools remain open "unsustainably".
  • Covid-19 cases are on the rise among middle-aged people in England and have risen over 90 percent in 14 days as the outbreak continues to rise, official figures show.
  • The head of British Airways defended its decision to shed up to 12,000 jobs, saying the pandemic left the national airline "in the fight for survival".
  • A Manchester hospital was responsible for a third of all Covid-19 deaths in England last week. This was exposed amid concerns that the life-threatening disease would spread between wards.
  • Boris Johnson couldn't rule out a second national lockdown as he admitted the government's coronavirus testing system can't handle it.

The most recent PHE data released on Friday clearly shows that cases in each age group are spiraling. People in their twenties – who are not as susceptible to the disease and likely to escape death or serious illness – are driving the surge with an infection rate of 46, which has doubled in the past three weeks

Public Health England (PHE) data shows 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people between the ages of 40 and 49 - up from 12.4 at the end of August. And coronavirus infection rates nearly doubled in just a week for people in their fifties, rising from 10.9 to 20

Public Health England (PHE) data shows 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people between the ages of 40 and 49 – up from 12.4 at the end of August. And coronavirus infection rates nearly doubled in just a week for people in their fifties, rising from 10.9 to 20

Curfews, Pub Closures, and Small Gatherings: How Britain Could Curb Wave Two

The UK could follow Belgium's lead and take steps to curb the rising number of coronavirus cases.

Brussels has contained a second wave of coronavirus by limiting the number of people who could socialize and imposing a nationwide curfew.

The European country experienced a virus resurgence in mid-July, comparable to the UK's current development.

On July 29, officials there introduced new rules, reduced the number of people who could socialize from 15 to five and introduced a curfew for the entire population at 10 p.m.

Coronavirus infections increased in Belgium in mid-July. By August, the weekly case rate rose to over 35 per 100,000 – the current level in the UK – and the daily infections rose to 1,000. The numbers have dropped in the past few weeks. As of September 1, only 194 new cases were reported.

Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty is among those who have praised the Belgian government's efforts to combat the outbreak.

Last week he said Belgium was "a clear indication that if you act quickly and decisively when these changes take place, there is a reasonable or good chance of getting interest rates back under control".

Such a move would allow people to still go to work and school, but would limit nightlife, which could put high pressure on the hotel industry as pubs and restaurants are forced to close prematurely.

Options on the table can range from curfews to pubs closing – although it is clear that schools will remain open.

This despite today's warnings that schools could be forced to close by default in the coming weeks due to a massive lack of testing across the UK.

"Lockdown is the only thing we know works, to be honest," a government science adviser told ITV.

The dire prospect was raised amid fears that the disease is on the verge of spiraling out of control.

Although the number of cases has increased over 3,000 a day, it has mainly been younger people who are less likely to be severely affected.

But now cases of Covid-19 among middle-aged people in England are on the rise and have increased over 90 percent in 14 days as the outbreak continues to worsen.

Public Health England (PHE) data shows 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people between the ages of 40 and 49 – up from 12.4 at the end of August. And coronavirus infection rates nearly doubled in just a week for people in their fifties, rising from 10.9 to 20.

Boris Johnson faced MPs this afternoon, telling the liaison committee that steps were needed to avoid a full national lockdown.

The Prime Minister told the committee: “I don't want a second national lockdown, I think that would be completely wrong for this country. We will do everything in our power to prevent this from happening.

“Can we afford it? I very much doubt the financial consequences will be anything but catastrophic, but we need to make sure we use the means we have planned to defeat the disease.

“When I see people saying and arguing against the rule of six that the government is restricting individual freedoms too much and so on, I understand that completely, I sympathize with it, but we have to, have to defeat this disease. & # 39;

Downing Street has not denied any reports that curfews could slow the spread of the coronavirus.

When asked about reports that a curfew might be imposed in London, a spokesman for Number 10 previously said, “We will continue to check the transmission rate.

& # 39; We introduced the rule of six to try to lower the transfer rate as it has been increasing lately.

"But as I said, we will continue to review this data and the scientific evidence."

Alarms, however, were triggered by early signs that hospital admissions are on the rise and that infections are becoming more common in the elderly.

The problems were exacerbated by the test system, which got into chaos after schools returned and showed high demand for children to be screened.

The Rhondda Cynon Taf area in South Wales will be locked down after an increase in local coronavirus cases, the Welsh government said this afternoon.

Health Minister Vaughan Gething announced that the measures, which will be reviewed within two weeks, will take effect at 6 p.m. on Thursday.

Rhondda Cynon Taf, with a population of around 240,000, had a rolling 7-day case rate of 82.1 per 100,000 people.

As part of the measures, individuals are not permitted to enter or leave the Rhondda Cynon Taf parish without a reasonable apology.

People can only meet with members of their extended household outdoors, not indoors.

All licensed premises must close at 11 p.m.

UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock (right) and Chief Whip Mark Spencer greet each other on Downing Street in London

UK Health Secretary Matt Hancock (right) and Chief Whip Mark Spencer greet each other on Downing Street in London

The “rule of six” imposed by Boris Johnson on Monday makes it illegal to hold large gatherings, although in Scotland and Wales children under the age of 12 do not need to be included in the figures.

Ministers have suggested following the example of Belgium, where an increase appears to have been approached with tight limits on gatherings and curfews.

A senior government official told ITV's Robert Peston that "there is no way we can wait for the death rate to rise before we act".

They added that the government will re-examine whether the rule of six is ​​enough to control the situation in a fortnight – but there is a widespread view that schools should not be closed again.

According to reports, a senior science advisor said, “I think if we are to keep schools open we may need to seriously consider a variety of other measures to stop a big second wave.

"And we have to think about it now – what to start doing."

The Red Lion Pub in Westminster, a few meters from the Houses of Parliament, was surrounded by drinkers last night despite the introduction of the rule of six on Monday.

The Red Lion Pub in Westminster, a few meters from the Houses of Parliament, was surrounded by drinkers last night despite the introduction of the rule of six on Monday.

The “rule of six” imposed by Boris Johnson on Monday (pictured today at PMQs) makes it illegal to hold large gatherings, although in Scotland and Wales children under 12 do not need to be counted

The “rule of six” imposed by Boris Johnson on Monday (pictured today at PMQs) makes it illegal to hold large gatherings, although in Scotland and Wales children under 12 do not need to be counted

Second UK pub bans under 25 for social distancing

Another UK pub has temporarily banned under 25s because the landlady claims there is a lack of social distancing among young drinkers.

The Red Lion in Whinmoor announced the move on Monday on Facebook and confirmed that people in the age group between Friday and Sunday will not be able to attend.

The landlady, who wanted to remain anonymous, said the decision was made to protect the company's staff along with its regular customers from coronavirus.

She added that the Red Lion has some "good young customers" who adhere to social distancing guidelines, but a minority "spoil it for others" as they have to keep reminding them to respect the guidelines in force, to stop the virus from spreading.

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer was forced to miss the prime minister's questions due to a delay in receiving a coronavirus test result for one of his children, his deputy said.

Angela Rayner, who stood in the mailing box for Sir Keir on Wednesday lunchtime, told Boris Johnson that she had received a message from "a man named Keir".

She told Commons: “Keir couldn't go to work and his children couldn't go to school today because his family had to wait for their coronavirus test results despite the Prime Minister's promise to get results within 24 hours.

"Keir has been able to do the right thing, isolate himself and work from home, but other people are not in that position – many of them are the very people who are getting us through this crisis."

Mr Johnson said he understood that a negative test had been returned for Sir Keir's child, adding, "I don't know why he's not here."

The Labor leader was advised to self-isolate Monday while awaiting the result of a test on a member of his household showing possible symptoms of Covid-19.

Less than half an hour before the PMQs began, Sir Keir said he was "very pleased and relieved that one of my children tested negative this morning".

On Tuesday it was decided that his deputy, Ms. Rayner, should take his place at Question Time.

The possibility of going tougher exists despite a major Tory backlash to the limitations of everyday life.

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland denied this morning that the "rule of six" would effectively cancel Christmas after a source close to the Archbishop of Canterbury criticized the social restrictions imposed this week to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

The Archbishop of Canterbury warns that the "rule of six" harms family life

The Archbishop, Bishop of Canterbury, warned of centrally-imposed coronavirus restrictions and said he was "deeply concerned" about the impact of the "rule of six" on family life.

Most Rev. Justin Welby said the government was "determining the daily details of our lives" during the coronavirus lockdown in ways "few of us have seen" when he advocated locality instead.

He said Britain had an "addiction to centralization" and argued that the country should adopt the "only centralize what needs to be centralized" stance.

The Archbishop is also said to be concerned about the impact of the "Six Rules" – a ban on indoor and outdoor gatherings of more than six people – on "the vulnerable, needy, poor and old" in Britain.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4's Today program, the Cabinet Secretary said: “Archbishop Justin (Welby) is making an important contribution to this debate and he is right to point out the enormous spiritual and social significance of Christmas.

“I don't think any of us in government wants to be Oliver Cromwell-esque – we want families to celebrate Christmas safely and happily, and we want our churches and other places of worship to join in the celebration. & # 39;

Mr Buckland added, "We are not going to cancel Christmas, but the 'rule of six' is clear and important and I think we have committed to and must adhere to it."

Health Secretary Matt Hancock yesterday battled angry calls to exempt young children from the rules in England to save Christmas.

He was repeatedly pushed for the "unfair and inflexible" restrictions when making a statement in the House of Commons.

While Mr. Hancock insisted on understanding the "implications" of the rules, he said that "simplicity" was critical to their effectiveness.

Senior Conservatives have risen to urge the government to copy the Scottish and Welsh governments, which have stated that children under the age of 12 do not count towards the limits of gatherings.

Home Secretary Priti Patel warned yesterday that two families colliding on the street would break the new law.

She said that more than half a dozen people who stop chatting after accidentally meeting them would constitute a "mingling".

Lawyers asked if this was the case – but No. 10 offered assistance, saying, "You can expect the police to tell you to disperse."

Ms. Patel also said that she would report her own neighbors for any behavior she deemed "inappropriate" and at risk of spreading the virus.

The comments came after police complained that they had been left in the dark on how the tough restrictions could be enforced, without guidance and widespread public anger.

A SCHEDULE FOR THE AVAILABILITY OF COVID-19 TESTS IN THE UK

January – sick travelers: In the early days of the pandemic, before it was known that the virus was spreading in the UK, people could only be tested for coronavirus if they had symptoms of the disease – at the time a cough and / or fever – and had traveled there at risk Area or near someone who had.

Initially, this vulnerable area began with the city of Wuhan – ground zero of the pandemic – and was later expanded to include China as a whole and other countries such as Thailand, South Korea and later Italy.

March – Hospitals only: The tests were stopped for members of the public on March 12th. This now controversial move came because the virus was so out of control in travelers returning home from mid-term ski tours in the Alps in February that there wasn't enough testing to have any meaningful impact.

The only people who could get a Covid-19 test were hospital patients – those who were seriously ill – and employees who worked in the hospitals.

April – key workers: Swab tests returned to the public in April. Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced on April 23 that key workers and their families (with the exception of children under five) could be tested if they had symptoms – a new persistent cough or fever.

People who weren't a key force and didn't live with one, or who didn't have either of these symptoms, were still not allowed to get tested.

Late April – Over 65: End of month on April 29The tests have been expanded to allow people over 65 – with symptoms – to be tested. This age group has caused the vast majority of coronavirus deaths in the UK and is far worse for them than for younger people.

May – Anyone with Symptoms: On May 18Three weeks after the Health Department claimed it had met its goal of 100,000 tests a day – a claim that later turned out to be false – the tests were expanded again.

Now, according to the Minister of Health, anyone over five years with symptoms of Covid-19 – this list was expanded on the same day to include lost or changed smell or taste senses – can be tested.

Late May – Under-Fives: The rule was extended again on May 27th Include children under five, meaning anyone of any age in the UK was eligible for a test if they had Covid-19 symptoms.

That rule still applies – anyone with symptoms can have a test. It has never been government policy to offer tests to people who do not have any of the three symptomsHowever, there are a few exceptions, e.g. B. People taking part in studies or officially referred by their employer.

July – Tests for Nursing Homes: The government promised to offer routine swab tests for nursing home staff and residents 3rd of July. Nursing homes, where more than 14,000 people have died, suffered badly at the height of the crisis because they did not have access to large-scale testing.

Nursing homes currently run around 100,000 tests a day – about half the national capacity – to test all staff once a week and residents once a month.

This system is still fraught with problems, however, and Martin Green, CEO of Care England, told The Times: & # 39; There are delays with couriers failing to take swabs and problems with the laboratories, to get the results back in time …

"The test regime needs to be thoroughly reviewed."

August – tests for schools: As schools prepared to return to classes after a six-month hiatus from the lockdown and summer, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson promised that all schools would have access to DIY tests to send students home with symptoms.

However, teachers say they did not get enough tests and that students and staff who are unable to get tests through the national testing system languish in self-isolation at home, not knowing if they have Covid-19 or not Not.

Jim Blakely, director of the Garstang St. Thomas & # 39; School in Preston, told the Today program: & # 39; This is what we really need urgently … a 24-hour turnaround time on tests, ideally so families can get back to work and kids can go back to school. & # 39;

August – & # 39; Please take a test & # 39 ;: Baroness Dido Harding, head of NHS Test & Trace, urges the public to get tested.

Concerned that cases were not going down because people avoided using Test and Trace, she said, “Please do your part to keep the virus from flaring up again. This system only works if you sign up for a test and help us trace your contacts. So if you have mild symptoms, get a free trial right away. & # 39;

September – & # 39; Stop getting so many tests & # 39 ;: In September, Health Secretary Matt Hancock urged people to stop getting tested if they didn't have coronavirus symptoms.

He said an increase in "ineligible" people put a strain on the testing system, which now buckled under the pressure of processing 200,000 swabs a day.

The Department of Health estimates that one in four tests is now done by people who shouldn't be taking it.

Mr. Hancock continued the 9th of September: "We have seen an increase in demand, including from people who are not eligible for testing, from people who have no symptoms."

The number of people being tested for coronavirus has increased from under 20,000 in April to over 200,000 a day

The number of people being tested for coronavirus has increased from under 20,000 in April to over 200,000 a day

In a sign of increasing chaos, the government has stopped publishing daily capacity figures – the dates are now labeled "N / A". The exam of Tsarina Baroness Harding also faces questions. Ministers are calling for schools to be given "priority" and "quick" access to checks.

Although Health Secretary Matt Hancock previously boasted "Moonshot" plans to run 10 million tests a day, he is now rushing to create a "priority list".

When hospitals and nursing homes come first, however, the prospect of schools remaining in limbo increases. Teachers say 740 have already been forced to shut down or send children home because of so many having cold or cough symptoms.

Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, said school principals are required to order that the "bubble must stay home" if a student or teacher cannot get a test to prove they are negative.

"I think this is going to feel like a lockdown by default – it's going to be more frustrating for parents because there's no telling if it's going to happen," he told BBC Radio 4's Today program.

ASCL urged Mr. Johnson "to take on this situation personally to keep our schools and colleges open and to protect students and staff".

When asked if there was enough testing capacity, Mr. Johnson answered bluntly, “No, we don't.

"We don't have enough testing capacity now because in an ideal world I want to test absolutely anyone who wants a test right away."

He promised to do 500,000 tests a day by the end of October.

But he urged people with no symptoms to stay away from testing centers – despite acknowledging the reasons they might want to find out if they had Covid-19.

"What happened is that the demand has only increased massively in the last few weeks," he told MPs.

Professor Andrew Hayward, one of the government's SAGE experts, said that at this time of year, even before the pandemic hit, around half a million people could be showing symptoms like coroanvirus every day.

That would be well over the current government claim of around 375,000 testing capacity – although they have never done so many in a single day.

Prof. Hayward, Director of the Institute for Epidemiology and Health at University College London, said: “The rationale for this is, of course, that we would expect demand and capacity to be right in the fall and winter as the number of people doing this must rise quickly develop symptoms that could increase Covid.

"Some of our research has shown that, at least in winter, around half a million people develop symptoms that are typical of Covid every day – and that in a winter when there was no Covid – as you can see that capacity needs must increase dramatically if we want to keep up. & # 39;

Hundreds of schools have been partially or completely closed due to proven and suspected coronavirus cases, creating fears of a domino effect that resulted in parents unable to go to work and empty offices returned.

According to figures, more than one in ten children was absent from class last Thursday as the growing number of students and staff waiting for tests could affect parents' confidence in their children's return to school.

It is because teachers will protest outside the Department of Education today, arguing that the lack of tests and the inability of staff, students and parents to get to the top of the queue are preventing schools from returning to normal.

One told the i that they could not book a test for their daughter online or over the phone on Sunday even though they tried every hour.

Her efforts included driving to a local test center that turned out to be closed and then to Gatwick, where there were no queues, but she was turned away for not booking.

The public had been asked to carry out tests when in doubt. However, upon checking through the mail, it found that 46 of the 49 virus hotspots – including Bolton, Bradford and Oldham – had no swabs to offer.

Preston, one of the three areas Tests revealed they weren't available until January – and 22 miles away.

It has been reported that Mr. Hancock is considering making GPs “gatekeepers” to the system.

However, this could put a massive strain on operations, with complaints that appointments are already extremely difficult to access in many areas.

There were long queues in front of the test centers today, with many desperate people who had not been given an online appointment but showed up anyway.

Lines formed in Southend – but in a sign of general chaos – other test centers such as Leeds were almost empty.

Dr. Patrick Roach, Secretary General of the NASUWT Teachers Union, has called on the government to give the education sector priority in assigning tests.

In a letter to the school minister, Dr. Roach said the union had heard from around 600 students who were told to self-isolate in Bury and the situation was "increasingly out of control".

"Teachers, support staff, and children and adolescents cannot access tests that show symptoms of Covid-19," he wrote.

"Employers have trouble dealing with the effects and consequences."

He added, "We have reports that schools are unable to cope with a situation that is getting increasingly out of control."

The founder of Oasis Community Learning, which is responsible for 31,500 children at 52 academies across England, said 1,200 students were sent home in the first six days of the new school year.

Steve Chalke wrote in The Sun, "The reason for this is that either students or teachers have symptoms and cannot return until they get a negative test result."

Concern about the government's seven "lighthouse laboratories" and their ability to process results is growing due to staff and equipment shortages.

One MP said her constituents in Twickenham, south-west London, had been asked to travel to Aberdeen to book a test.

The UK has announced another 14 Covid-19 deaths in the preliminary count, although the final number may sometimes differ

The UK has announced another 14 Covid-19 deaths in the preliminary count, although the final number may sometimes differ

Munira Wilson, Lib Dem health spokesperson, said: "We have been promised the world's best testing and traceability system, but what we have right now is a complete mess."

Mr Johnson has berated Keir Starmer for failing to see him at PMQs today after the Labor chief announced that one of his children had a negative coronavirus test.

The Labor leader said he was "pleased and relieved" to be out of self-isolation after waiting two days for the outcome.

"740 schools have to close or send students home"

About 740 schools have been forced to close or send students home on suspicion of coronavirus, it was alleged today.

Steve Chalke, head of the Oasis Academies Trust chain, told The Sun that he had received the number – around three percent of the total.

It highlights problems caused by delays in getting tests and results that can allow teachers and students to no longer self-isolate.

However, he skipped the Commons showdown that lunchtime, with Deputy Angela Rayner entering.

She spoke the & # 39; Keir & # 39; at the shipping box and said he had to miss work because he didn't get the result of a test on time.

But Mr Johnson pointed out that Sir Keir was now out of quarantine. "I'm not sure why he's not here."

The prime minister defended the Shambolian testing regime despite warnings that delays meant that schools are on the verge of becoming "unsustainable".

"Eighty-nine percent of those who did personal tests got (results) the next day," Johnson said. "We are working very quickly to process any test requests we receive."

In an effort to explain the root causes of the problems, Mr Johnson said: "The British people are understandably responding to this system with a huge surge in demand."

He insisted that "it is important that everyone follow the instructions on when to get a test".

Ms. Rayner urged the Prime Minister to deliver tests and PPE to nursing homes before winter.

"The prime minister has put his trust in Operation Moonshot, but NHS testing for multiple areas of high infection is nowhere on planet Earth," she said.

She asked, "Can the Prime Minister confirm yes or no, do all nursing homes in this country have weekly tests?"

Mr. Johnson replied, "Yes, to the best of my knowledge, nursing homes in this country should … weekly tests for all staff and tests every 28 days for those in the nursing homes, the residents of the nursing homes."

Another test center in Leeds was practically empty today given the criticism of the systems

Another test center in Leeds was practically empty today, given the criticism of the systems

The Prime Minister also complained that Labor was playing "from the sidelines" as the government tried to tackle "one of the most difficult dilemmas" any government has ever faced.

Gavin Williamson, who appeared before the Education Committee today, announced that he had met the government Test & Trace Czarina Baroness Harding this week to insist that schools must have a "quick" screening available.

Covid cases occur in middle-aged people

The most recent PHE data released on Friday clearly shows that cases in each age group are spiraling. People in their twenties - who are not as susceptible to the disease and likely to escape death or serious illness - are driving the surge with an infection rate of 46, which has doubled in the past three weeks

The most recent PHE data released on Friday clearly shows that cases in each age group are spiraling. People in their twenties – who are not as susceptible to the disease and likely to escape death or serious illness – are driving the surge with an infection rate of 46, which has doubled in the past three weeks

Covid-19 cases are on the rise among middle-aged people in England and have risen over 90 percent in 14 days as the outbreak continues to rise, official figures show.

Public Health England (PHE) data shows 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people between the ages of 40 and 49 – up from 12.4 at the end of August. And coronavirus infection rates nearly doubled in just a week for people in their fifties, rising from 10.9 to 20.

The most recent PHE data, released on Friday, clearly shows that cases are increasing in every age group. People in their twenties – who are not as susceptible to the disease and likely to escape death or serious illness – are driving the surge with an infection rate of 46 that has doubled in three weeks.

Fear of a second wave is growing as the number of Britons diagnosed with Covid-19 daily surpasses 3,000 for the first time since May. Ministers have also been terrified by the mounting outbreaks in Spain and France and rising hospital admissions across the continent.

Hospital admissions – another way of measuring the severity of the pandemic – have doubled in England in the past nine days. More than 150 newly infected patients required NHS treatment on Sunday, compared to a seven-day rolling average of 52 on the last day of August.

“We always knew that with children coming back to school there would be a situation where people would need more access to tests. That is why we ensured these test deliveries to every school in England. That's why we opened the ordering system this morning so schools can order new tests and get them straight from the NHS, ”he said.

Mr. Williamson said he had emphasized to Lady Harding that testing should be a "priority" for schools.

“Just this week I met with Baroness Harding of Test and Trace and the NHS to highlight some concerns the schools had about the turnaround and to make sure the teachers can and can be tested as soon as possible able to return to teaching at the earliest possible time. & # 39;

Mr. Williamson dodged questions about whether the government could guarantee test results for schools within 48 hours but added, “As you can imagine, I have met with Baroness Harding to keep the importance and priority we have To emphasize In order to improve all of our schools and educational institutions, we must always ensure that rapid tests are available. & # 39;

Committee chairman Robert Halfon later told BBC Radio 4's World at One that he had been advised that schools would be a priority under Mr. Hancock's new program.

"As far as I know, schools will be on the priority list," Halfon told the program.

Education Department sources said they had little control over the provision of schools, suggesting that it was a "problem in the laboratories". “We don't do any tests. We don't monitor the tests. It's a DHSC thing, ”a source said.

An ally of Mr Williamson told MailOnline they had doubts about whether schools were the bulk of the additional demand, citing 1.6 million children returned in June and July and "we didn't see any of it".

The ally added, "There is definitely frustration."

Ministers had already faced a crisis in the first wave of Covid when a campaign by the Mail led to Mr Hancock pledging to run 100,000 tests a day.

That pledge was later raised to 200,000 as part of the ambitious Operation Moonshot, then to 500,000 by the end of October, and now to four million by February next.

However, the system has been thrown into chaos again in the past few days as the demand for tests has grown massively and overwhelmed the laboratories.

The increase is due to an increase in daily cases, the return of schools, the introduction of regular swabs in nursing homes, and an increase in outbreaks.

There were also rumors of logistical problems in laboratories.

As a result, there has been a flurry of complaints that local people cannot access tests or that they have to wait too long to find out if they are positive or negative. Schools have closed while teachers await results from sick students.

NHS leaders warn of a crisis in hospitals that will force medics to stay away from work and abandon operations.

Today's numbers showed that 221,192 tests including antibody and surveillance screening had been carried out in the UK in the past 24 hours.

That was a decrease from 227,075 yesterday, 231,969 on Monday and 250,839 on Sunday.

The last time it was lower than September 9, when only 209,609 were performed.

However, the government has not released a figure for total capacity since September 10 when it was claimed to be 374,917.

The Ministry of Health has refused to reveal how many people are trying to get swabs.

The number of people actually tested has increased 23 percent since late August, while capacity has increased 12 percent – although this is not currently known.

Sodexo, which operates the centers, has posted job advertisements for employees on the drive-and-walk-in sites as the UK prepares for a rising number of cases as the number of infections rises in people of all ages in England.

Labor MPs have called the test fiasco a "farce" and "unacceptable", while scholars admit they are seriously concerned that the government has not prepared for what they have known for months about what will eventually happen.

The minds are trying to forbid the teachers from working at halftime

School principals could discourage staff from traveling overseas during half-time, as it turned out today.

According to The Times, the Stone King law firm has received around 20 calls from state schools asking for advice on whether they can ban teachers from leaving the UK during school holidays.

This is due to the fact that more than 1,000 teachers across Scotland were forced to self-isolate due to symptoms of Covid.

Meanwhile, official school attendance records have shown that 99 percent of schools have reopened since the coronavirus pandemic, but one in ten students has not returned.

About 88 percent of state students were back in class on September 10, which means 12 percent were reported absent, according to the Department of Education.

This corresponds to around 960,000 students who do not go to school – around 400,000 fewer than usual.

Professor Alan McNally, a geneticist at the University of Birmingham who helped set up a government laboratory in Milton Keynes, told BBC Breakfast yesterday that there are "clearly underlying issues that no one wants to tell us about".

He said, "I think there is an increase in demand (and) I think our reported capacity is very different from the actual number of tests that can be done in any given day."

Dr. Joshua Moon of the University of Sussex Business School added, “One of the deeper problems is why we see an acute shortage when the total number of tests per day is currently two-thirds of the testing capacity required by the government.

“I am particularly concerned about why the claimed capacity was so much higher than it actually was.

"Without a proper understanding of system capacity, a fundamental weakness is the ability to plan for the future."

In a round of radio interviews this morning, J.Justice Secretary Robert Buckland said testing capacity was "ramped up" to meet demand. He said Mr. Hancock would present the "priority list" "in the next few days".

Speaking to Sky News, Mr Buckland said, “I don't shy away from the current edition, but I try to explain that we have accepted the scale of the challenge instead of sitting back and pretending everything is fine. We are expanding the test centers, increasing the laboratory capacity and putting new laboratories into operation so that we can achieve this rapid processing. & # 39;

He added: “The fact that the government kept talking about the dangers of a second wave, the Prime Minister, all of us, at all times was absolutely focused on the dangers of the second wave – we saw what was happening in France.

“We absolutely believe that if we are to balance the restoration of the economy and schooling for the children in the fall, we all have a special responsibility to follow all of these guidelines – do everything possible to combat this virus . & # 39;

The test meltdown has occurred in the context of a surge in coronavirus cases, with fears the situation is on the verge of spiraling out of control again.

Brits could face an even tougher lockdown within two weeks if the rule of six doesn't eliminate coronavirus cases, it was claimed today.

Ministers and government officials insist that despite a wave of criticism, they are ready to take more draconian steps to stop the spread.

Options on the table can range from curfews to pubs closing – although it is clear that schools will remain open.

Tsarina Baroness Dido Harding was on Downing Street today asking more and more questions about the system of government

Tsarina Baroness Dido Harding was on Downing Street today asking more and more questions about the system of government

"Lockdown is the only thing we know works, to be honest," a government science adviser told ITV.

The dire prospect was raised amid fears that the disease is on the verge of spiraling out of control.

Although the number of cases has increased over 3,000 a day, it has mainly been younger people who are less likely to be severely affected.

Downing Street has not denied any reports that curfews could slow the spread of the coronavirus.

When asked about reports that a curfew might be imposed in London, a number 10 spokesman said today: “We will continue to check the transmission rate.

& # 39; We introduced the rule of six to try to lower the transfer rate as it has been increasing lately.

"But as I said, we will continue to review this data and the scientific evidence."

Mr Hancock was called into the House of Commons yesterday to answer an urgent Labor question on the fiasco. When asked if the problem would be resolved this week, he replied, "I think we will be able to resolve this problem in a few weeks."

Britons could have curfews in a matter of weeks

Brits could face an even tougher lockdown within two weeks if the rule of six doesn't eliminate coronavirus cases, it was claimed today.

Ministers and government officials insist that despite a wave of criticism, they are ready to take more draconian steps to stop the spread.

Options on the table can range from curfews to pubs closing – although it is clear that schools will remain open.

"Lockdown is the only thing we know works, to be honest," a government science adviser told ITV.

The dire prospect was raised amid fears that the disease is on the verge of spiraling out of control.

Although the number of cases has increased over 3,000 a day, it has mainly been younger people who are less likely to be severely affected.

Alarms, however, were triggered by early signs that hospital admissions are on the rise and that infections are becoming more common in the elderly.

Last night, former Health Secretary Ken Clarke accused ministers of "irritating" and "disillusioning" the public by making impossible promises for tests.

Citing testing issues, Commons spokesman Lindsay Hoyle said, "This is totally unacceptable and undermining the lead. So I have raised my concerns to ministers to urge urgent action."

Dr. Layla McCay of the NHS Confederation, which represents health organizations, said, “Our members tell us that lack of access to testing for employees is a major barrier to service delivery and achievement of service recovery goals.

“We seem light years away from the world's best test-and-trace system that we were promised. Every week we wait for these issues to be resolved is a week some NHS workers are unable to go to work and a week that makes it harder to identify and contain Covid-19 surges. & # 39;

Mr. Hancock is preparing to publish a “priority list” over the next few days that will be used as a set of rules for testing centers to determine who will be offered a swab.

Currently, in theory, one should be offered to everyone, regardless of whether they are a key worker or even have symptoms.

However, the list makes it clear to the centers that if there is a bottleneck in testing capacity, priority will be given to NHS and nursing home staff, patients, key workers and students. All others are denied a test until the capacity is increased.

The ministers also plan to open two huge lighthouse laboratories to process the test results.

Seven are in operation – in Cambridge, Milton Keynes, Newport, Glasgow, Alderley Park in Cheshire, Loughborough in Leicestershire and Antrim in Northern Ireland.

The increase in demand was mainly caused by the return of schools as the children spread coughs and colds. Concerned parents book the whole family for tests to avoid long self-isolation.

The rise in virus cases has raised public concern and ministers have claimed that people book tests before going on vacation even though they have no symptoms.

At the same time, experts believe that testing capacity has been affected by a shortage of equipment and staff, including doctoral students who have returned to university.

Last night, a leaked memo from The Guardian claimed that the lighthouse labs were at full capacity even in late August.

Dido Harding: The Tory peer, hailed by Hancock for "fantastic leadership," watched over months of the farce

Baroness Dido Harding was hailed by Health Secretary Matt Hancock on her appointment in May for “fantastic leadership”.

This has become a national embarrassment after the Tory peer was tasked with implementing the new NHS app, mass testing and contact tracing program in May.

Baroness Harding is a former jockey despite quitting after 40 and promising her husband that she will quit

The app has been massively scaled down and it could be next year when a full mass testing scheme is in place.

The government responded to her failure by giving her another job.

Last month she was provisionally held responsible for the replacement position for Public Health England.

Experts said it made as much sense to appoint their interim head of the new National Institute for Health Protection (NIHP) as Chris Whitty (England's chief medical officer) was made head of Vodafone.

Dies war ein Hinweis auf Hardings mangelnde Erfahrung im Bereich der öffentlichen Gesundheit und ihre frühere Tätigkeit als Geschäftsführerin des Telekommunikationsgiganten TalkTalk, wo sie einen der schlimmsten Datenverstöße in Großbritannien überwachte, bei dem Hacker 157.000 Kunden Bankdaten stahlen.

Baroness Dido Harding aus Winscombe, 53, wuchs auf einer Schweinefarm in Somerset auf und ist die Enkelin von Field Marshall Lord Harding, dem Kommandeur der Wüstenratten, der zum ältesten Soldaten der britischen Armee wurde.

Als ehemalige Jockeyin ist sie mit John Penrose verheiratet, dem konservativen Abgeordneten von Weston-super-Mare.

Sie studierte neben David Cameron Politik, Politik und Wirtschaft an der Universität Oxford und hatte nach ihrem Abschluss eine Reihe von Funktionen bei Thomas Cook, Woolworths, Tesco und Sainsbury's inne.

Baroness Harding wurde 2010 zur CEO von TalkTalk ernannt und war sieben Jahre lang in dieser Funktion tätig. Während dieser Zeit war das Unternehmen Opfer eines Cyberangriffs, bei dem die persönlichen und Bankdaten von 157.000 Kunden erfasst wurden, auf die Hacker zugreifen.

Nach dem Hack wurde sie wiederholt erpresst, wobei Bitcoins als Gegenleistung für gestohlene Daten angefordert wurden, darunter Kundennamen, E-Mail-Adressen, Handynummern, Privatadressen und Geburtsdaten.

In der Folge wurde TalkTalk mit einer Geldstrafe von 400.000 GBP für Sicherheitslücken belegt, die es ermöglichten, bei einem der größten Datenverstöße in der Geschichte „problemlos“ auf die Daten zuzugreifen.

Es wird angenommen, dass TalkTalk durch den Fallout 60 Millionen Pfund verloren hat, wobei geschätzte 100.000 verärgerte Kunden, hauptsächlich BT, abgereist sind, während sich der Gewinn 2015 auf 14 Millionen Pfund halbierte und Aktien fast zwei Drittel ihres Wertes verloren.

Baroness Harding wurde wiederholt aufgefordert, wegen des Verstoßes zurückzutreten, blieb jedoch bis 2017 bestehen, als sie zurücktrat, um sich auf ihre „gemeinnützigen Aktivitäten“ zu konzentrieren.

Später in diesem Jahr wurde sie zur Vorsitzenden von NHS Improvement ernannt, die für die Überwachung aller NHS-Krankenhäuser verantwortlich ist.

Als mächtige Persönlichkeit weigert sie sich zu glauben, dass ihr Geschlecht sie jemals zurückgehalten hat, und sie wird auch keine weiblichen Quoten in Unternehmensvorständen befürworten, was sie als politische Einmischung ansieht.

Sie glaubt auch, dass die Arbeitnehmer zu viel Mutterschaftsurlaub haben, obwohl sie zugeben muss, dass sie als Chefin ihre eigene Karriere erfolgreich mit der Zeit mit den beiden Töchtern, die sie mit ihrem Ehemann hat, in Einklang bringen kann.

Anfang dieses Jahres wurde sie wegen ihrer Rolle im Vorstand des Organisators des Cheltenham Festivals, des Jockey Clubs, kritisiert.

Wissenschaftler haben das Festival, das im März stattfand, als "Katastrophe" bezeichnet und behauptet, es habe die Ausbreitung des Coronavirus in Großbritannien beschleunigt, nachdem 260.000 Menschen wenige Tage vor Beginn der Sperrung auf die Rennbahn strömten.

The number of Covid-19 cases in people in their forties and fifties has risen 90% since the end of August – while the number of patients hospitalized doubled in just nine days, official figures show

Covid-19 cases are on the rise among middle-aged people in England and have risen over 90 percent in 14 days as the outbreak continues to rise, official figures show.

Public Health England (PHE) data shows 23.4 cases are now diagnosed for every 100,000 people between the ages of 40 and 49 – up from 12.4 at the end of August. And coronavirus infection rates nearly doubled in just a week for people in their fifties, rising from 10.9 to 20.

The most recent PHE data, released on Friday, clearly shows that cases are increasing in every age group. People in their twenties – who are not as susceptible to the disease and likely to escape death or serious illness – are driving the surge with an infection rate of 46 that has doubled in three weeks.

Fear of a second wave is growing as the number of Britons diagnosed with Covid-19 daily surpasses 3,000 for the first time since May. Ministers have also been terrified by the mounting outbreaks in Spain and France and rising hospital admissions across the continent.

Hospital admissions – another way of measuring the severity of the pandemic – have doubled in England in the past nine days. More than 150 newly infected patients required NHS treatment on Sunday, compared to a seven-day rolling average of 52 on the last day of August.

But government officials say a second wave of Covid-19 in the UK, it wouldn't be anywhere near as bad as the first one that killed between 40 and 55,000 people because we have better contain the virus through local lockdowns and social distancing measures, and medical breakthroughs have helped lower the death rate.

Hospital admissions - another way of measuring the severity of the pandemic - have doubled in England in the past ten days. More than 150 newly infected patients required NHS treatment on Sunday, compared to a seven-day rolling average of 52 on the last day of August

Hospital admissions – another way of measuring the severity of the pandemic – have doubled in England in the past ten days. More than 150 newly infected patients required NHS treatment on Sunday, compared to a seven-day rolling average of 52 on the last day of August

Hospital admissions - another way of measuring the severity of the pandemic - have doubled in England in the past ten days. More than 150 newly infected patients required NHS treatment on Sunday, compared to a rolling average of 56 days the previous week

Hospital admissions – another way of measuring the severity of the pandemic – have doubled in England in the past ten days. More than 150 newly infected patients required NHS treatment on Sunday, compared to a rolling average of 56 days the previous week

The PHE figures released on Friday, which provide the most detailed insight into the state of the coronavirus crisis in England, showed how people in their twenties are driving the current outbreak.

The infection rate for people ages 20 to 29 has increased from 23.5 cases per 100,000 people for the week ended August 16 to 46 in the last full week of data, which ended September 6.

The rate is now 29.8 for people in their 30s, down from 19.6 the week before and 16.4 at the end of August. And it rose to 23.4 for 40 to 49 year olds, down from 13.5 in the last seven days and 12.4 at the end of last month.

Infection rates rose from 10.9 to 20 in one week for people in their fifties and from 7.5 to 12.4 for people in their sixties.

There are also increasing cases of people over 70 who are the most susceptible to the disease because of their age. The infection rates rose in the last week from 4.6 to 7.3 for those over 70 and from 8.9 to 12.9 for those over 80.

In children, the rates for children up to the age of four rose from 5.6 to 7.7 and for 10 to 19 year olds from 5.1 to 8.1.

According to the Ministry of Health, hospital admissions have also increased over the same period.

Government statistics show that 153 newly infected patients were in need of NHS care in England as of Sunday 13th September. Similar data has not yet been published for Monday or yesterday.

For comparison, 85 patients were admitted to a hospital in England last Sunday.

The 7-day rolling average of hospital admissions – considered one of the best ways to analyze trends – shows the rate increased from 52.43 on the last day of August to 127.57 on September 13. The rate was over 100 on September 10 and 72 on the last Sunday.

Hopes of combating a second wave are also high, as vaccines may be available by next spring and a "long pipeline" of promising hits is being tested.

In addition, early signs from the southern hemisphere suggest that a flu outbreak will be less severe than in previous years.

The top Belgian scientist Jean-Luc Gala said the rising infection rate in Belgium was "completely normal" and the ongoing lockdown measures should be relaxed. He told the French-language newspaper La Dernière Heure that "people are no longer suffering from the coronavirus, but measures to stop it".

He said people shouldn't worry as the virus "circulates in a category that doesn't suffer from it, young people who at worst have small symptoms, at best nothing". He said that people who are moderately infected by the virus are beneficial as it contributes to widespread immunity.

Ministers had been concerned that a combination of flu and corona cases would prove disastrous for the NHS this winter.

However, officials also expect that advice on hygiene and social distancing during the corona pandemic will suppress flu rates – as will the trend to work from home and avoid public transportation.

In Australia and New Zealand, which tend to be good indicators of how the flu is developing in the UK, cases have remained low year on year.

Officials still believe the next six months will be "very difficult" for the NHS and the country as a whole – but their cautious optimism contrasts sharply with recent warnings from medical unions and medical schools claiming hospitals cannot comply cope with a second wave.

A survey by the British Medical Association this week found that 86 percent of doctors expect the coronavirus to rise again in the next six months.

When Spain, France and Belgium hit 18 cases per 100,000 cases (which the UK did in early September), they saw up to a four-fold increase in approvals. However, Belgium was able to reduce its hospital rate by reintroducing strict measures

When Spain, France and Belgium hit 18 cases per 100,000 cases (which the UK did in early September), they saw up to a four-fold increase in approvals. However, Belgium was able to reduce its hospital rate by reintroducing strict measures

In August, the hospitalization rate in Belgium doubled from one in 100,000 to two in 100,000, but has since been suppressed

In August, the hospitalization rate in Belgium doubled from one in 100,000 to two in 100,000, but has since been suppressed

Hospital stay rates remain low in the UK, falling from a high of more than 30 per 100,000 people to less than one in 100,000, but officials fear they will rise again soon

Hospital stay rates remain low in the UK, falling from a high of more than 30 per 100,000 people to less than one in 100,000, but officials fear they will rise again soon

However, government officials believe that while cases are picking up again, the curve will be flatter compared to March and April.

Part of the reason for this prediction is the fact that we now know so much more about the virus. This includes medical advances such as the discovery that the steroid treatment dexamethasone can reduce the risk of death from coronavirus by a third.

Officials also say local lockdowns – and the beleaguered testing and tracing service – have successfully prevented recent outbreaks from spreading further.

However, they stress that it is wrong to assume that the virus only circulates among young people.

While many new cases are in patients between the ages of 17 and 21, the latest statistics show that infection rates for people in their fifties and sixties are now as high as they were for patients in their twenties a few weeks ago.

Yesterday's health ministry figures showed there had been 3,105 new coronavirus cases in the past 24 hours, compared to around 5,000 a day at the height of the crisis. There were another 27 deaths, up from nine on Tuesday.

A special envoy for the World Health Organization said yesterday that the "grotesque" global outlook is "far worse than any science fiction".

Dr. David Nabarro, who appeared before the Foreign Affairs Committee, told MPs: "It's a terrible situation … a health problem is so out of control that it's plunging the world into not only a recession but a huge economic one." Contraction that would likely double the number of poor people, double the number of malnourished (and) cause hundreds of millions of small businesses to go bankrupt. & # 39;

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