ENTERTAINMENT

No class! Students are forced to eat with their hands after the head cutlery banned the cutlery


Students are forced to eat their school meals – including mashed potatoes – with their HANDS after cutlery was banned due to a risk of Covid

  • The students of the Edgar Stammers Primary Academy in Walsall eat "finger food".
  • Academy bosses claim the use of cutlery could endanger the spread of the coronavirus
  • Parents angry children had to hand eat mashed potatoes in Yorkshire pudding

Students were forced to eat with their hands after their school bizarrely banned knives and forks for safety reasons – although mashed potatoes are still served in the canteen.

Students at Edgar Stammers Primary Academy in Walsall are given lunch in the classroom to ensure they don't mix with children from other bubbles during the Covid pandemic.

A reduced "finger food" menu is offered after the bosses alleged that cutlery was at risk of spreading the virus. However, parents were unhappy to discover teenagers were expected to eat mashed potatoes in a Yorkshire pudding with their hands.

Students at Edgar Stammers Primary Academy in Walsall are given lunch in the classroom to ensure they don't mix with children from other bubbles during the Covid pandemic

One parent who did not want to be named called the rules a "joke".

Headmaster Darren Mann admitted that some of the feedback was "not positive," but said it was up to the local academy trust to decide whether cutlery could be reintroduced.

In a letter to parents sent in late November, Mr Mann said he had informed the University of Wolverhampton Multi Academy Trust of their desire to return cutlery "as soon as possible".

He said: “As the parents know, we tried to increase the amount of hot food in the menu, but with the restriction that it would be classified as finger food.

“Today, as part of lunch, we had a small amount of porridge which was served in a Yorkshire pudding for the children to pick up and eat together.

& # 39; Unfortunately, the feedback from some parents and children has not been positive.

& # 39; I also informed our Academy Trust of our desire to use cutlery as soon as possible. As soon as it is classified as safe under the Covid restrictions, we will inform all parents and children. & # 39;

Professor Michelle Shaw, CEO of the University of Wolverhampton Multi Academy Trust, said picnic lunches are served in brown bags because plates, hot food and utensils "cannot be safely transported to schools".

A reduced "finger food" menu is offered after management claims that cutlery risked spreading the virus. File image

A reduced "finger food" menu is offered after management claims that cutlery risked spreading the virus. File image

She said students washed their hands before and after eating and that the use of "hard utensils that could spread the virus" was limited.

"All of our school principals are working very closely with their catering teams to keep providing hot meals to our children throughout the pandemic," she said.

“At lunchtime, precautions have been taken to ensure that children do not mix with children from other bubbles. This means that children have their groceries brought to them in their areas of the school buildings instead of using school dining rooms.

& # 39; To make this as safe as possible, hot meals are offered in pouch-style packaging.

She continued, “With health and safety a priority in all of our schools, all of our Covid risk assessments are regularly reviewed and procedures are updated accordingly.

"We cannot safely move plates, hot food and utensils around schools because some have steps, and we also cannot keep this food at the temperatures required to serve it."

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