ENTERTAINMENT

Nigel Farage renames the Brexit Party anti-lockdown reform UK


Nigel Farage is trying to revive his political career by renaming the Brexit party as the anti-lockdown party.

The party has officially petitioned the Electoral Commission to change its name to Reform UK and will campaign against coronavirus measures.

Mr Farage, who has chaired UKIP on several occasions, and Richard Tice, leader of the Brexit party, announced the party's new goals and said they would address several "powerful interest groups".

This includes "the House of Lords, the BBC, the way we vote, law and order, immigration". The pair also claim "ill-managed, lavish quangos abound".

However, the party that wants to benefit from the anti-lockdown sentiment believes that the most important issue is "the government's sad reaction to the coronavirus".

The announcement follows another day of Covid News yesterday that:

  • 23,254 cases were reported yesterday – 17.5 percent more than 19,790 cases last Sunday;
  • Another 162 people died after testing positive for coronavirus in the UK yesterday. This was the highest increase on Sunday since May.
  • Prince William announced that he was secretly diagnosed with coronavirus in April.
  • Britain wavered after Boris Johnson announced a four-week lockdown on Saturday.
  • New restrictions will close all pubs, restaurants and non-essential businesses.
  • People can only leave their home for certain reasons, such as: For example, to make important purchases, exercise outdoors, and work when they are unable to work from home.
  • Former chief scientific adviser Sir Mark Walport said there is a chance the restrictions will have to remain in place for more than four weeks.

Nigel Farage (pictured) is trying to get his political career going again by renaming the Brexit party as the anti-lockdown party

The announcement is said to make life more difficult for Boris Johnson as he tries to calm his troubled MPs who oppose the new measures

The announcement is said to make life difficult for Boris Johnson as he tries to reassure his troubled MPs who oppose the new measures

Protesters gather in Birmingham to demonstrate against a second lockdown on Saturday

Protesters gather in Birmingham to demonstrate against a second lockdown on Saturday

It is alleged that the government tried to "bring the nation into submission" while waiting for a vaccine that "is not a way to fight a disease that may have long existed".

The party – led by Mr Farage – supports the Great Barrington Declaration, written by three top scientists and now supported by more than 44,000 medical professionals and scientists.

The letter calls for the isolation of only elderly and vulnerable people so that the rest of the population can become infected with the virus in the hope of achieving herd immunity.

The statement received widespread criticism, with Health Secretary Matt Hancock claiming it was "not true" that herd immunity can be achieved by enough people who contract coronavirus.

The announcement is said to make life difficult for Boris Johnson as he tries to reassure his troubled MPs who oppose the new measures.

In a joint article for The Daily Telegraph, Mr Farage – who has headed UKIP several times – and Mr Tice said, "Bans don't work: in fact, they do more harm than good."

23,254 cases were reported on Sunday - 17.5 percent more than 19,790 cases last Sunday

23,254 cases were reported on Sunday – 17.5 percent more than 19,790 cases last Sunday

Another 162 people died after testing positive for coronavirus in the UK on Sunday. This was the highest increase on Sunday since May

Another 162 people died after testing positive for coronavirus in the UK on Sunday. This was the highest increase on Sunday since May

Mr Farage, who has headed UKIP several times, announced the party's new goals and Brexit party leader Richard Tice (pictured) said he would tackle several "powerful interest groups".

Mr Farage, who has headed UKIP several times, announced the party's new goals and Brexit party leader Richard Tice (pictured) said he would tackle several "powerful interest groups".

They said the new party would support a policy of "targeted protection" of the most vulnerable people from the virus, adding, "The rest of the population should get on with life with good hygiene and a dose of common sense."

Mr. Farage added: “We believe there is a massive political hole right now. The crisis has shown how badly we are governed. Brexit is the beginning of what we need. Brexit gives us self-government – we now need good self-government. & # 39;

The new party hopes to list candidates in the May local council elections when the Tories hold thousands of Shire seats.

Mr Farage's previous political campaigns with Ukip and the Brexit party cut the Tory vote and his latest move is likely to affect some Conservative MPs.

Mr Farage's previous political campaigns (pictured) with Ukip and the Brexit party cut the Tory vote, and his latest move is likely to affect some Conservative MPs

Mr Farage's previous political campaigns (pictured) with Ukip and the Brexit party cut the Tory vote, and his latest move is likely to affect some Conservative MPs

The Brexit party won 29 seats in last year's European Parliament elections, which took place just ten weeks after it was founded. In the general election, she won 275 seats, but only received 2 percent of the vote and won no seats.

Mr Farage – who has never won a MEP seat – will hope that companies hit hard by lockdowns will support Reform UK, including those in the hospitality industry, as well as the self-employed.

According to reports, hundreds of thousands of pounds have already been pledged for the party with the new badge.

An electoral commission spokesman said that if the name change request contains all of the information required by law, it will be posted online for public comment.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Nigel Farage (t) Coronavirus (t) Brexit (t) BBC