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Nicola Sturgeon Reveals New FIVE Tier Bans and Urges Boris to Hand Over More Westminster Cash


Scotland's New 0-4 Tier System, How It Works:

Nicola Sturgeon today made plans for a new 0-4 step lockout. Here is how it would work.

Level 0

As close as possible to normal. Broadly in line with the situation in Scotland in August when the virus was suppressed but is still there.

At this level, people could meet indoors with eight people from three households, and most organizations would take open security measures.

Level 1

Household gatherings would be reduced to six people from two households, but overall there would still be a fair amount of normality.

Level 2

The restrictions are largely similar to those currently in place outside of Scotland's central belt. It includes restrictions on hospitality and no gatherings in people's homes.

level 3

Broadly similar to the stricter restrictions currently in place across the central belt – including Glasgow and Edinburgh, with much of the hospitality completely closed. But restaurants could be "at least partially" open.

Both levels 2 and 3 should apply for relatively short periods of time in order to bring the transmission under control.

Level 4

This would occur if "the transmission rates are very high or threaten to become very high given the corresponding pressure on the NHS and possibly the risk of excessive demands on the NHS".

Closer to a full lockdown, with non-essential stores closed. But six people from up to two households could still meet outdoors, there would be no restriction on outdoor movement for individuals, production and construction companies would remain open with existing security measures.

Ms Sturgeon added: "We have no plans to go back to a situation as grave as the first ban, which was imposed in late March."

Nicola Sturgeon warned that some parts of Scotland – or the whole nation – could again face a severe blockade with all shops and schools closed except the main ones – as she asked for more money from Boris Johnson.

The First Minister today unveiled Scotland's new five-step approach, which would see the shutters fall back down on Scottish High Street while trying to keep some other businesses going.

She outlined the new Level 0-4 system live on TV today, holding an olive branch to hospitality businesses that were breaking the tough new restrictions that would to some extent hamper trade at all levels.

She said while she would listen to arguments about trying to keep some pubs and restaurants open at higher levels, she would not promise to make any changes.

She warned "it is possible that the whole country could be brought to the same level" and declined to exclude some parts of the country that will be immediately set to level 4.

Companies in Scotland that are subject to lockdown restrictions can apply for grants in addition to grants made available under the UK Government's Employment Promotion Program.

Businesses forced to close due to lockdowns are granted grants of £ 2,000 or £ 3,000 every four weeks.

Those who can stay open but cannot trade as usual due to restrictions can apply for funding of £ 1,400 or £ 2,100 every four weeks, which is broadly in line with the program in England.

However, Ms. Sturgeon warned that the money would run out and called for a "resolution" from the British government.

In a strike against Boris Johnson and Chancellor Rishi Sunak, she called for the same measures for Scottish companies as were revealed in England yesterday.

& # 39; The Chancellor's commitment to England was unlimited. He will pay the demand from the business for as long as necessary. I think that's right and right, ”she said.

“He can because he can borrow the money to pay for it. The Scottish Government cannot, so we have to rely on the Chancellor to give Scottish companies the same funding guarantees that he already has for those in England. This has not yet been done.

& # 39; As a result of yesterday's announcement, Scotland has not been guaranteed a single penny of additional funds over and above those already allocated. Although I am not prepared to offer companies here less funding than their counterparts in England receive, I have to be clear on this point

“Without a resolution on the point I just highlighted, the money the Scottish Government has to pay for this guarantee will eventually run out.

“When exactly that will happen depends on the demand, of course, but it will happen. It is not possible to fund demand-driven obligations indefinitely from a limited budget without credit authority. "

The Prime Minister gave details of the system, which will have to be ratified by the Scottish Parliament next week, despite restaurants and retailers reacting violently to the prospect of indefinite tightening of restrictions.

Nicola Sturgeon (pictured today) shared details on the five-tier system, despite restaurants and retailers vigorously responding that restrictions could remain tightened indefinitely

Scotland has already received billions from Westminster coffers for the coronavirus fight

Scotland has already received more than £ 6.5 billion from the UK government in direct response to the coronavirus crisis, figures show.

That's more than half of the total Covid cash that is being spent on decentralized administrations to stave off the worst of the crisis.

And it comes on top of UK programs like the Job Support Scheme that Rishi Sunak unveiled last month and revised yesterday to give workers more government money.

According to the latest figures, Wales received £ 4bn compared to £ 6.5bn in Scotland and £ 2.2bn in Northern Ireland.

In addition, the decentralized administrations will receive over £ 950million in the 2020-21 financial year to keep the direct payments to farmers going.

The amount of money is determined by a system called the Barnett Formula

It is a system used by the UK government to find out how much money should be given to the other home countries if they decide to spend more or less on something in England.

It was designed in 1978 by former Treasury Department Labor Chief Secretary Joel Barnett.

Although it is not legally enshrined, it has been used by the Treasury Department to calculate funding numbers for more than 40 years.

It is controversial because the amount of money given to Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland in the form of a block grant from Westminster is calculated based on the population and delegated powers of Whitehall.

This should mean that in theory spending should go up and down equally.

The calculations are complicated, however, and Scotland started spending per capita higher when the formula was first used, meaning discrepancies are being burned into the system.

The formula should always be temporary, and even the architect said in 2014 that it was "unfair and should be stopped".

In August Tory MPs slammed the "funding gap" after official statistics showed that public spending per person north of the border was nearly £ 2,000 above the UK average.

They showed that total public sector spending in favor of Scotland, including spending by the UK and the Scottish Government, rose by just over 3 percent to £ 81 billion.

This equates to £ 14,829 for public services per person in Scotland, around £ 1,633 per person, which is above the UK average.

Conservative backers in Westminster said that if the Holyrood SNP government believed in independence, it should refuse to accept English taxpayers who subsidize their services.

They claimed that Nicola Sturgeon and her party "abuse everything that comes out of Westminster – except the money".

Circuit breakers have been blocked north of the border for a fortnight. In large parts of the country, bars and restaurants are no longer allowed to serve alcohol and are closed. It has been extended to November 2nd when the new system goes live.

Under the new 0-4 tier system, the current restrictions in the central belt where the pubs are closed would be level three. Below level four, even non-essential retail stores would close again. But Ms. Stör promised to keep the schools open.

Ms. Sturgeon said Level 1 and Level 2 are closest to the normal state the country can achieve without effective treatment or vaccination, while the highest level would be more similar to a full lockdown.

The Scottish Retail Consortium said closing non-essential stores in Level 4 – the highest tier – will do little to lower coronavirus rates.

Its Director David Lonsdale said: & # 39; We fully support efforts to reduce the R-number and get a grip on the current public health situation.

"However, we believe that any move to shut down non-essential retailers will have very little impact on reducing the spread of the virus while causing significant economic damage."

He added, “Retail has shown it can function safely in the current environment and it is noteworthy that there has been no spike in infections after the non-essential store lockdowns were lifted in late June.

& # 39; Scottish retailers have invested tens of millions of pounds in keeping business safe for customers, including plexiglass screens, social distancing and extra hygiene measures.

“Shops therefore remain a safe place for customers and employees.

& # 39; Scottish stores lost £ 2.4 billion in retail sales in the first seven months of the pandemic and have yet to recover to pre-crisis levels.

& # 39; Any attempt to close non-essential stores during the golden Christmas shopping district can result in many being unable to re-open because they missed this important trading period.

“It is positive that the government only accepted in times of need, when unnecessary stores had to close. That decision must weigh up public health recommendations that admit the minimal impact on reducing coronavirus transmission versus the catastrophic impact on these companies. "

As of October 9, bars and restaurants in five areas of the Health Authority – Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Lanarkshire, Ayrshire and Arran, Lothian and Forth Valley – have been forced to close to all but take-out.

Pubs, bars, restaurants and cafes in other parts of Scotland are only allowed to serve indoor customers between 6am and 6pm, and alcohol is prohibited inside. However, alcoholic drinks can be served outside until 10 p.m.

In response to corporate attacks, Ms. Sturgeon said, “We are publicly posting this today. In the coming days we will listen to stakeholders' views on possible changes or how they would like the plan to be implemented.

As part of that process, I will call another meeting with the leaders of other parties this afternoon.

& # 39; I guess many companies, for perfectly understandable reasons, would rather not see restrictions that result in a shutdown or significant restriction of trade. However, I also know that you understand why these decisions are necessary and we would like to give you the opportunity over the next few days to present your specific proposals.

“In particular, I know that hotel companies particularly affected would like to argue that different types of premises should be open at different levels of intervention.

“I cannot promise that we will be able to process every request while the virus continues to be suppressed, but I can promise that we will listen.

"None of us want to place restrictions on companies or individuals that are not strictly necessary."

Scotland has had 18 coronavirus deaths and 1,401 positive tests in the past 24 hours.

The Coronavirus First Minister told the Scottish Government that the death toll from the measure – of people who tested positive for the virus for the first time in the past 28 days – had risen to 2,688.

Ms. Sturgeon said 54,016 people tested positive in Scotland, up from 52,615 the previous day.

According to data, the Scottish Covid-19 infection rate is the LOWEST in the UK

According to official data, Scotland has the lowest weekly coronavirus infection rate per population in the UK.

According to MailOnline, there are currently 161.2 cases per 100,000 people in Scotland.

The rate doubled in three weeks, rising from 77.4 on October 3rd. However, it is only 7.2 percent above the value of 150.4 last Friday.

Northern Ireland actually has the worst Covid-19 outbreak in the UK, according to statistics from the Department of Health.

There are currently 378.6 cases registered per 100,000 people – but the rate of growth is also slowing, as it has only increased 2.4 percent in one week.

The Wales outbreak is growing much faster, the data says. The current infection rate is 206.1 – an increase of 29.5 percent from last week.

England is also seeing the same growth, up 22.7 percent from 166.9 last Friday to 204.8 today.

The daily test positivity rate is 8 percent, down from 9.2 percent on Thursday.

Of the new cases, 493 are in Greater Glasgow and Clyde, 413 in Lanarkshire, 169 in Lothian and 117 in Ayrshire and Arran. There are 969 people in the hospital who were confirmed to have the virus, 41 within 24 hours. Of those patients, 76 are in intensive care, an increase of two.

Ms. Sturgeon stole Boris Johnson for being too shy about setting the rules in England, pointing out that Chief Medical Officer Chris Whitty doesn't think the third tier curbs are tough enough.

The move comes after Ms. Sturgeon was forced to make a bizarre promise to Scottish children that Santa would deliver their Christmas presents – after her top medical advisor called hopes of a traditional festive gathering "fiction".

The regime is due to be stamped in Holyrood next week before it comes into effect.

Ahead of the briefing, she said there would be a "detailed and intensive consultation" on levels: "Covid-19 continues to have a devastating impact on our entire lives.

“Therefore, now more than ever, it is more important than ever to be determined to work vigorously and collaboratively to keep the virus down – and keep it there – as we strive to return to more normal lives for as many people as possible.

“However, suppressing the virus must be a collective effort. We have to stick with it, support one another and learn from one another.

"The more we all do right now to obey the rules and cut the numbers, the more freedom we can enjoy."

Ms Sturgeon has already said that the three intermediate levels will be broadly similar to the English system, where areas are classified as either 'medium', 'high' or 'very high' risk.

However, she insisted that a different level was required than that introduced by Mr. Johnson.

"When England released its (system), the then Chief Medical Officer in England said the top level was not enough to necessarily fight the virus under all circumstances," she said.

"So we think we need one closer to a full lockdown when things have to get this serious."

Scotland will also have a lower tier for areas with fewer Covid-19 cases – what National Clinical Director Professor Jason Leitch described as "slightly more freedom than other parts of the country".

Circuit breakers have been blocked north of the border for a fortnight. In large parts of the country, bars and restaurants are no longer allowed to serve alcohol and are closed

Circuit breakers have been blocked north of the border for a fortnight. In large parts of the country, bars and restaurants are no longer allowed to serve alcohol and are closed

Experts express a shock that Rishi Sunak is unaware of the cost of his last major coronavirus rescue package

Experts expressed shock that Rishi Sunak does not know how much his latest major coronavirus bailout will cost – dismal numbers showed the UK's economic recovery is slowing.

The prestigious IFS think tank said it was "exceptional" that the Treasury Department failed to provide a clear estimate of the huge package the Chancellor revealed yesterday.

Mr. Sunak has been accused of catching up as he expanded its supply to the hospitality sector and the self-employed, amid concerns that re-bans could destroy millions of jobs.

The curbs impact on UK plc was underscored this morning by closely watched PMI numbers, which took growth to a four-month low.

Temporary restrictions were introduced across Scotland earlier this month, originally intended to end on October 25th, but extended until the new tiered system came into force.

As of October 9, bars and licensed restaurants in five areas of the Health Authority – Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Lanarkshire, Ayrshire and Arran, Lothian and Forth Valley – have been forced to close to all but take-out.

Pubs, bars, restaurants and cafes in other parts of Scotland are only allowed to serve indoor customers between 6am and 6pm and alcohol is prohibited inside. However, alcoholic drinks can be served outside until 10 p.m.

Ms. Sturgeon had to suppress an outcry yesterday after her national clinical director Professor Jason Leitch said families should prepare to see loved ones at Zoom over Christmas over Christmas due to the coronavirus.

Prof. Leitch told BBC Scotland that while there may be a certain “normality” over Christmas, “we won't have large family groups with multiple families, that's fiction for this year”.

When asked if Santa Clauses need to use Zoom in their grottos across the country, she turned to the camera and said, “When Santa is watching children, Santa won't be prevented from delivering your presents on Christmas Eve. He is a key worker and has many magical powers that make him sure to do so.

“If he has to do Zoom cave appearances to protect you, it's not because he's at risk. As usual, Santa Claus will deliver gifts all over the world. & # 39;

She added, "Since I spend so much time responding to Jason's comments today, I should get him to dress up as the Grinch for Halloween and do a briefing to cheer everyone up."

Alcohol is essential, but hairdryers are not: Welsh ministers fidget as they try to defend Mark Drakeford's new "trolley police" as he orders supermarkets to only sell "essentials" after the 17-day lockdown on the "ceasefire." "starts in Wales TODAY

Welsh ministers have stalled as they tried desperately to defend a ban on stores selling "non-essential" goods during a "fire break" lockdown beginning tonight.

Health Secretary Vaughan Gething made it clear that alcohol is a key issue under the confusing new rules that go into effect at 6 p.m. – but insisted that hair dryers don't.

He also acknowledged that a "line by line" list of products sold was "unusable" and hoped retailers would have an "adult understanding".

The mess came after Prime Minister Mark Drakeford stated that stores would no longer be able to sell items such as clothing during the 17-day squeeze starting tonight.

There are fears that this will mark a return to the scenes seen at the start of the pandemic, when there was controversy over the contents of people's shopping carts.

Many retailers will be forced to close completely during the "fire safety" lockdown, but grocery stores and pharmacies can remain open.

During a bruised interview with Kay Burley on Sky News, Mr Gething said the Welsh government was producing "categories" for sale.

"A supermarket that sells clothes is not essential. We want adults to understand what they can do so that they can do that."

He added, “We don't want to go line by line through thousands of product items. That would be useless from their and our point of view, ”he said.

Burley asked if the situation meant alcohol was essential but a hair dryer was not.

"Well, food and drink are things we had in the first phase of the pandemic. They are available everywhere," Gething replied.

When the moderator insisted, "Trust me, my hair dryer is important", Mr. Gething replied, "No, it isn't, Kay."

Burley said: 'Of course it is. Look at the condition of your hair compared to mine. I need to dry my hair, you can towel dry yours. & # 39;

But Mr Gething replied, "I don't think the biggest problem on people's minds in Wales is going to be whether they can buy a hair dryer for the next two weeks."

The country's police forces have not released any information on how the process will work. However, more details are expected to be announced later.

The move sparked anger among the opposition and Welsh Conservative Andrew RT Davies tweeted, "The power goes into their heads".

The lockdown is considerably more severe than the three-tier system in England. Wales requires people to stay at home except for limited purposes such as sports and the complete closure of pubs, restaurants, hotels and non-essential shops.

This week a travel ban for hotspot areas in England to Wales was passed despite the Police Federation calling it "unenforceable".

In contrast, even in England's strictest tier three areas, some outdoor social gatherings are allowed and pubs can remain open provided they offer customers a "full meal".

As a result, revelers took to the streets of Cardiff city center last night to enjoy a blast in the city before the new restrictions go into effect.

In Scotland, First Minister Nicola Sturgeon also wants to go tougher than the Prime Minister, with more curbs to fight the pandemic, despite downplaying claims by a top advisor that families should prepare to watch loved ones over Zoom this Christmas on the ongoing crisis.

First Minister Mark Drakeford said it would be "made clear" to supermarkets that only certain parts of their stores could be opened to sell essentials

First Minister Mark Drakeford said it would be "made clear" to supermarkets that only certain parts of their stores could be opened to sell essentials

A graph shows how the number of coronavirus cases in Wales has increased since the end of August, but less in recent days

A graph shows how the number of coronavirus cases in Wales has increased since the end of August, but less in recent days

A graph shows how the number of coronavirus hospitalizations in Wales has increased in the past few days but not skyrocketed

A graph shows how the number of coronavirus hospitalizations in Wales has increased in the past few days but not skyrocketed

A graph shows how coronavirus deaths have increased in Wales since late August, but less in recent days

A graph shows how coronavirus deaths have increased in Wales since late August, but less in recent days

A group of young people posed in Cardiff last night to make the most of a night before the Welsh lockdown

A group of young people posed in Cardiff last night to make the most of a night before the Welsh lockdown

During a bloody interview with Kay Burley on Sky News, Vaughan Gething said the Welsh government was producing "categories" that could be sold

During a bloody interview with Kay Burley on Sky News, Vaughan Gething said the Welsh government was producing "categories" that could be sold

Mr Drakeford said it was being "made clear" to supermarkets that only certain parts of their stores could be opened to sell essentials.

Retailers have only been given a few hours to put together plans for the lockdown, which will run through November 9th, as shopkeepers argue that the rules don't make sense as customers are already in their stores to get the "essentials." “Item to buy.

Mr Drakeford made the announcement on a Senedd committee in response to a question from conservative MS Russell George who said it was "unfair" to force independent clothing and hardware retailers to close while similar goods are being sold in large supermarkets .

"At the first restrictions, people understood to some extent that supermarkets weren't closing all the things they might have needed," Drakeford said.

“I don't think people will be as understanding this time around, and we are going to make it clear to the supermarkets that they can only open those parts of their business that supply people with essential goods and that do not include some of the things Russell George mentioned, which other people are prevented from selling.

"So we will make sure that there is a level playing field for the next two weeks."

Starting Friday, all leisure and non-essential retail stores will be closed, including clothing stores, furniture stores, and car dealerships. A full list has yet to be published.

Shops that are allowed to remain open include supermarkets and other grocery stores, pharmacies, banks, and post offices.

Young people had their last chance for a two-week evening in Cardiff last night

Young people had their last chance for a two-week evening in Cardiff last night

A group of young people took a pose in Cardiff last night before the Welsh lockdown at 6pm today

A group of young people took a pose in Cardiff last night before the Welsh lockdown at 6pm today

Pepole gathered outside a Cardiff pub last night before the Welsh ban goes into effect tonight

Pepole gathered outside a Cardiff pub last night before the Welsh ban goes into effect tonight

A group of revelers pose on the streets of Cardiff last night before the Welsh lockdown goes into effect

A group of revelers pose on the streets of Cardiff last night before the Welsh lockdown goes into effect

Revelers took to the streets of Cardiff last night to spend another night on the town before the new lockdown occurs today

Revelers took to the streets of Cardiff last night to spend another night on the town before the new lockdown occurs today

Pubs and bars are closing tonight due to the Welsh government's lockdown on "fire safety" so many made sure to wind down one last evening

Pubs and bars are closing tonight due to the Welsh government's lockdown on "fire safety" so many made sure to wind down one last evening

Friends sat down together in downtown Cardiff for a drink before the new fire barrier goes into effect today

Friends sat down together in downtown Cardiff for a drink before the new fire barrier goes into effect today

The law allows firms that run a business that offers a mixed set of services to open if they discontinue the services that need to close.

Mr George said: “It is deeply worrying that, given that we are only days from the lockdown, we are still waiting for a full list of the types of businesses to shut down and guidance to be published Business closures.

“At a time of considerable uncertainty, it is – intentionally or not – completely unacceptable to create even more concern and fear, which this government unfortunately manages.

“The people and businesses of Wales deserve better than to be left in the dark. In order to ensure people's jobs and livelihoods, I urge the Welsh Labor Government to heed our demands and immediately publish a list. & # 39;

Andrew RT Davies, the Conservative shadow health secretary, tweeted, "The power goes into their heads."

He later added, “Is a Strongbow pitcher considered essential? What about much-needed panties when you run short?

"I hope there are some published guidelines on what the Labor Commissioners think is essential."

A group of girls pose in Cardiff to make the most of a last night on the town before the new lockdown

A group of girls pose in Cardiff to make the most of a last night on the town before the new lockdown

Cardiff pubs and restaurants were busy last night before closing due to Wales' new 17-day lockdown

Cardiff pubs and restaurants were busy last night before closing due to Wales' new 17-day lockdown

A group of girls pose for a selfie one evening in Cardiff before Wales goes into a 17-day lock from 6pm on Friday

A group of girls pose for a selfie one evening in Cardiff before Wales goes into a 17-day lock from 6pm on Friday

Crowds took to the streets in the Welsh capital just hours before pubs, restaurants and non-essential shops close

Crowds took to the streets in the Welsh capital just hours before pubs, restaurants and non-essential shops close

With a host of new restrictions and pub closings on the horizon, these teens were desperate to take advantage of one last night on the town in Cardiff

With a host of new restrictions and pub closings on the horizon, these teens were desperate to take advantage of one last night on the town in Cardiff

Due to new rules, the drinkers packed in pubs for more than two weeks on their final evening in the Welsh capital

Due to new rules, the drinkers packed in pubs for more than two weeks on their final evening in the Welsh capital

Sue Davies of consumer group Which? Said the announcement would create "confusion", especially among the vulnerable.

"Our own research has shown that nearly half of those who identified themselves as situationally vulnerable during the previous lockdown in Wales had difficulty accessing the groceries and groceries they needed," she said.

“The Welsh Government must act now to resolve the situation where retailers can and cannot sell, and urgently identify those who need support most to ensure that no one at risk is in trouble To get access to groceries and other basics you need. '

The First Minister said he would keep the principality closed for as short as possible but insisted it was necessary to interrupt a "rising tide" of cases – even though Wales has a lower rate of infection than England.

The decision to impose a "short and deep" lockdown by November 9th, reflecting Sir Keir Starmer's national demands and wiping out Halloween and Bonfire Night, sparked angry political backlash.

The data showed England had a coronavirus infection rate of 166 per 100,000 people for the week of October 14, while Wales had a rate of 163 per 100,000.

Welsh Tories said it would doom the country to an endless cycle of two-week lockdowns, while Conservative MPs in Westminster said it was a "blunt instrument" and "the closure of all of Wales is disproportionate to the risk in some parts of the country. " Country & # 39 ;.

Sara Jones, director of the Welsh Retail Consortium, said: "It is ill-conceived and short-sighted to force retailers to stop selling certain items without being clearly told what can and cannot be sold."

And James Lowman, head of the Association of Convenience Stores, added, "Retailers must not be forced to stop making products available to customers just because ministers do not consider them essential."

A spokesman for the Welsh government said: "The ceasefire is intended to reduce all physical contact between households to an absolute minimum in order to slow the spread of the coronavirus and save lives.

“We have a small window in which to take these actions and there are no easy decisions.

"However, we are fully aware of the impact the fire is having on businesses and we are providing an additional £ 300 million to support them through this difficult time."

Supermarkets designed by the police (pictured outside a Lidl) to stamp out searches of high-demand items at the start of the pandemic

Supermarkets designed by the police (pictured outside a Lidl) to stamp out searches of high-demand items at the start of the pandemic

Police at a Tesco supermarket earlier in the pandemic as tensions surged with shoppers desperate for essential goods

Police at a Tesco supermarket earlier in the pandemic as tensions surged with shoppers desperate for essential goods

At the start of the pandemic, hordes of shoppers came to supermarkets at dawn to stock up on cleared aisles across the country after weeks of panic buying.

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