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NHS officials join the "anti-Vaxxer" group, which Pfizer compares jab to "poison" and speaks out against masks


More than 250 NHS and nursing home workers have joined an "anti-Vaxxer" group that likened the Pfizer shock to "poison" and opposed the wearing of masks.

NHS Workers for Choice, No Restrictions on Rejecting a Vaccine, are also against testing in hospitals and have seen membership surge over the past month.

The group is said to include Sheffield-based general practitioner Julie Coffey, who has stated she will not wear masks in stores – A&E nurses, medical assistants and laboratory technicians.

But it has been put on a warning label telling people to go to the NHS website for advice.

It is because conspiracy theories against vaccines are rampant on social media websites – despite promises by tech giants to stop their spread.

Meanwhile, a poll found that four in five Britons want those who spread false news about vaccines to be prosecuted.

Hopes for another successful sting are rising after scientists launched an attempt today to test it on 6,000 people in the UK.

The group reportedly includes Sheffield-based general practitioner Julie Coffey (pictured), A&E nurses, health workers and laboratory technicians

Pfizer and BioNTech have produced one of the world's leading candidates for a coronavirus vaccine and are the first to publish the results of their final study

Pfizer and BioNTech have produced one of the world's leading candidates for a coronavirus vaccine and are the first to publish the results of their final study

NHS Workers for Choice, No Restrictions on Rejecting a Vaccine, are also against testing in hospitals and have seen membership surge over the past month

NHS Workers for Choice, No Restrictions on Rejecting a Vaccine, are also against testing in hospitals and have seen membership surge over the past month

The group (pictured) consists of a doctor, A&E nurses, health workers and laboratory technicians

The group (pictured) consists of a doctor, A&E nurses, health workers and laboratory technicians

The private Facebook group claims it was not started as an anti-Vaxxer movement, but rather was designed to help healthcare workers.

However, a probe found that the Pfizer vaccine, which had the first positive results from its clinical trial, was "poison" and a frozen virus waiting to be "released."

The group was formed on October 4th as "NHS staff to choose, not a restriction of not wanting a vaccine."

But it changed its name to "NHS Workers to Choose From, No Restrictions on Rejecting a Vaccine" that same day.

A family doctor practice, which is part of the Facebook page, said she would prefer to leave her job than help with a vaccine administration.

A volunteer in a vaccine study in Turkey will receive a dose of Pfizer and BioNTech in late October

A volunteer in a vaccine study in Turkey will receive a dose of Pfizer and BioNTech in late October

There is a warning sign on the Facebook page asking people to visit the NHS website for advice (Figure).

There is a warning sign on the Facebook page asking people to visit the NHS website for advice (Figure).

The group was formed on October 4th as "NHS staff to choose, not a restriction of not wanting a vaccine."

The group was formed on October 4th as "NHS staff to choose, not a restriction of not wanting a vaccine."

On the subject of health care workers being the first to be stabbed, the Times noted that one member wrote, "NHS workers are gone – all sick and old will be gone."

They added: 'NHS gone. Reconstruction population. Welcome to the new world order. & # 39;

Health Secretary Matt Hancock rated the group's message this morning as "totally inappropriate".

He told Times Radio: “It is totally inappropriate to oppose vaccinations that have been strictly safeguarded.

“And I wouldn't advise anyone because we don't propose or allow vaccines in this country unless they meet some of the toughest safety requirements in the world.

“Getting a vaccine – be it against the flu or, hopefully, against the coronavirus – not only protects you, but also the people around you. So it's a really important step. & # 39;

Pfizer and BioNTech announced the first results of a massive clinical study last week that found nine out of ten people who received their sting would be protected from it.

Britain could get 10 million cans by Christmas – enough for five million Britons – and experts raising expectations that life could be "normal" again by spring.

Jeremy Corbyn's brother, a Sheffield-based general practitioner and a suspended nurse whose own son has distanced himself from her: anti-Vaxxers sowing doubts about a Covid jab

Sheffield-based doctor Julie Coffey has claimed that vaccines for the virus prioritize speed over safety.

The general practitioner who works for Dovercourt Medical Practice wrote on their website, “Although I am a conventionally trained medical practitioner and work as a general practitioner, I love the natural health work that I am now involved in.

"It is extremely gratifying to help people achieve better health naturally, which sometimes allows them to throw away their pills."

She has also reposted claims made by anti-Vaxxer groups on social media, saying that, despite government guidelines, she avoids using face covering in stores.

Ms. Coffey shared a video claiming that Wuhan has seen more Covid-19 deaths than other parts of China because of people being tested for a Sars vaccine there.

Jeremy Corbyn's brother, a Sheffield-based general practitioner and a suspended nurse are among those who sow doubts about vaccines.

Piers, the older brother of the former Labor leader, was arrested five times during the coronavirus pandemic he describes as a "planemic".

Piers Corbyn, the older brother of former Labor leader Jeremy, was arrested five times during the coronavirus pandemic he describes as a "planemic".

Piers Corbyn, the older brother of former Labor leader Jeremy, was arrested five times during the coronavirus pandemic he describes as a "plan".

The 73-year-old claims Covid-19 was a joke and the founder of a group called No New Normal.

He is close to conspiracy theorist David Icke, a footballer who believes global events are decided by reptiles.

They have performed on anti-lockdown marches and have spoken on stage in Trafalgar Square in central London.

Piers told the Times, “This vaccine is experimental and vaccine manufacturers are not responsible for illness or death.

& # 39; The whole is one of the main motifs of the new world order (a conspiracy theory that suspects a secret totalitarian world government)

The mother of four, Kate Shemirani, a 35-year-old former nurse, firmly believes the coronavirus is a hoax and claims that its symptoms are related to the introduction of 5G.

The mother of four, Kate Shemirani, a 35-year-old former nurse, firmly believes the coronavirus is a hoax and claims that its symptoms are related to the introduction of 5G

The mother of four, Kate Shemirani, a 35-year-old former nurse, firmly believes the coronavirus is a hoax and claims that its symptoms are related to the introduction of 5G

She has argued that the vaccine is a political tool to gain access to and alter people's DNA, compared the lockdown to the Holocaust, and insisted that NHS dancing nurses "are on trial for genocide."

She's headlined anti-lockdown rallies after joining conspiracy theorists David Icke and Piers Corbyn in a protest in August.

She directed Yobs to face riot police, who they referred to as "dirty dogs" and made fun of wearing face masks at a rally in September.

Her 21-year-old son Sebastian said he was concerned about the public health impact his mother's claims could have and described them as "dangerous" and "attention grabbing".

Consultative surgeon Muhammad Iqbal Adil from Locum was suspended from the GMC for 12 months in July for posting videos about the coronavirus online.

The 61-year-old dismissed Covid as a "joke" and said in a YouTube video that has since been removed that a vaccine could be combined with electrical components to monitor the world's population.

Consultative surgeon Muhammad Iqbal Adil from Locum was suspended by the GMC for 12 months in July for posting videos about the coronavirus online

Consultative surgeon Muhammad Iqbal Adil from Locum was suspended by the GMC for 12 months in July for posting videos about the coronavirus online

David Icke is the infamous conspiracy theorist who often makes the headlines for his controversial comments.

Born in 1952, the 68-year-old former professional footballer has written more than 20 books and tried his hand at pandemic and sports reporting once.

In 1991 he appeared on Sir Terry Wogan's TV chat show, declaring himself the Son of God in a now infamous clip that he describes as the "defining moment."

From here he began writing his books and making bold predictions, including that the world would end in 1997.

Other bizarre claims he's made are that the royal family are lizards.

David Icke is the infamous conspiracy theorist who often makes the headlines for his controversial comments

David Icke is the infamous conspiracy theorist who often makes the headlines for his controversial comments

Icke also believes that an interdimensional race of reptilian beings called archons hijacked Earth and prevented humanity from reaching their true potential.

The 68 year old has said that the universe is made up of "vibrational energy" and is made up of an infinite number of dimensions that share the same space, just like television and radio frequencies, and that some people can tune their consciousness to other wavelengths.

Most recently, he suggested that the coronavirus is connected to the 5G cellular network, a claim that has never been confirmed by science.

Despite the boom, anti-vaccine conspiracy theories are rife on social media websites – despite promises from tech giants to stop their spread.

Analysis shows that online businesses cannot remove harmful posts and videos that despise the use of bumps to treat Covid-19.

Charities also warned that exposure to misleading online posts could hamper efforts to launch a vaccine in the coming months.

The announcement of a breakthrough in the search for a vaccine last Monday sparked an immediate surge in misinformation, according to an analysis of the mail.

Exposure to Facebook posts mentioning the vaccine and Bill Gates, the Microsoft founder who is at the center of several conspiracies, more than tripled in just 24 hours.

Facebook continues to run ads for websites linked to banned conspiracy theorist David Icke, despite negotiating a crackdown with ministers earlier this month.

A scary video claiming the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine is unsafe and could be forced on people was shared nearly 5,000 times on the website and generated tens of thousands of views.

The original video, which was viewed nearly 57,000 times on YouTube, was produced by The Mirror Project, a website created in May that spreads conspiracies about the pandemic.

Facebook removed a page from the group after being made aware of the video.

Earlier this month, Google, Facebook and Twitter agreed to help the government eradicate anti-vaccine propaganda and discourage users and businesses from profiting from anti-vaccine content.

However, the activists dismissed the new commitments as "meaningless", saying that most of the misinformation on the websites was still online.

Imran Ahmed of the nonprofit Center for Countering Digital Hate said, "Since the pandemic began, social media companies have broken their promises to tackle vaccine misinformation despite warnings that they could be restricted from getting a Covid vaccine. & # 39;

Heidi Larson, director of the charity, said a small nudge caused by conspiracy posts hampered the ability to achieve herd immunity through a vaccine and warned of a "turning point".

A Facebook spokesperson said: "Since Covid-19 was declared a public health emergency in January, we have taken aggressive steps to limit the spread of misinformation about the virus and connect people with reliable information.

Four out of five people in the UK want those who spread false news about vaccines to be prosecuted.

An ORB International poll of 2,000 people for the Sunday Telegraph found that more than half of respondents believe that a vaccine made in record time can be safe.

Respondents were more likely to respond positively when asked to take a vaccine to protect their friends and family than to protect themselves.

It follows growing concerns about conspiracy theories and lies spread by so-called anti-Vaxxers that could hinder the mass rollout of a Covid-19 vaccine.

Over the weekend, Labor demanded that social media companies that fail to eradicate dangerous vaccine content face financial and criminal penalties.

In a letter to the government, Labor's Jonathan Ashworth and Jo Stevens say that online groups with hundreds of thousands of members produce disinformation.

According to the observer, they have offered to support any vote in the House of Commons if the government agrees to work with Labor on new laws.

Hopes for another successful coronavirus vaccine are rising after scientists launched an attempt today to test it on 6,000 people in the UK.

As part of an early access deal, the UK is promised 30 million doses of the vaccine by the pharmaceutical company Janssen by the middle of next year.

The large study to determine if the vaccine works aims to recruit around 6,000 people in the UK, out of a total of 30,000 worldwide.

Janssen's vaccine, owned by pharmaceutical giant Johnson & Johnson, comes in two doses. A result on whether it works could be available in six months.

Hopes for more successful vaccines are high after the world's first vaccine against Covid was announced last week after the results of the German biotech company BioNtech were shown. Image: Scientists working on the Pfizer vaccine in St. Louis, Missouri, USA

Hopes for more successful vaccines are high after the world's first vaccine against Covid was announced last week. The results of the study come from the German biotech company BioNtech. Image: Scientists working on the Pfizer vaccine in St. Louis, Missouri, USA

As part of an early access deal, the UK is promised 30 million doses of the vaccine by the pharmaceutical company Janssen by the middle of next year. In the picture: Scientists are working on the Janssen shock in Belgium

As part of an early access deal, the UK is promised 30 million doses of the vaccine by the pharmaceutical company Janssen by the middle of next year. In the picture: Scientists are working on the Janssen shock in Belgium

In Great Britain around 23,000 people have so far registered for vaccination trials for the sting developed at Oxford University and a trial by the US biotech company Novavax.

To date, nearly 318,000 people have indicated their willingness to participate in clinical trials by enrolling in the NHS vaccine research registry.

The government has made arrangements to ensure early access to 350 million doses of six vaccines, including the Janssen sting.

After the announcement of the world's first vaccine last week following the test results of the German biotech company BioNtech, hopes for more successful vaccines are high.

Kate Bingham, Chair of the Government's Vaccine Taskforce, said: “The recent news of progress in finding a vaccine is tremendously exciting, but we cannot focus on continuing the important research to find out which vaccines are best for different people work best. & # 39;

Six competitors in the race

BIONTECH / PFIZER

This is the first coronavirus vaccine shown to work. In a study of more than 43,000 people, it was found to be 90 percent effective.

There are some concerns about the two-dose burst as it largely needs to be kept in an ultra-cold store at around minus 70 ° C.

However, the interim results suggest that it is one of the most successful vaccines ever developed. It uses genetic code in a droplet of fat to tell the body to make the coronavirus spike protein, which causes the body's immune system to produce antibodies.

Ugur Sahin and his wife Oezlem are the brains behind the vaccine, and the German couple BioNTech are developing it together with the US pharmaceutical giant Pfizer. The UK is promised 10 million cans by the end of the year and 30 million next year. So far only hundreds of thousands have been produced.

OXFORD UNIVERSITY / ASTRAZENECA

The results of this vaccine are hoped for this week. Up to 100 million doses have been promised in the UK and 13,000 UK volunteers have participated in global studies.

The vaccine uses a deactivated chimpanzee cold virus that contains genetic code that causes cells to produce the spike protein on the outside of the coronavirus so the body can recognize and fight it off.

JANSSEN

An international study of 30,000 people, including 6,000 in the UK, begins today to measure the effectiveness of two doses of vaccine. It works like the Oxford vaccine, but uses a cold virus to provide the genetic code that causes cells to produce the coronavirus spike protein.

NOVAVAX VACCINE

The vaccine from US biotech company Novavax was tested in a British study in September and has so far recruited 10,000 people.

The vaccine contains a synthesized copy of the coronavirus spike protein and a "booster" to increase the immune response. The UK is promised 60 million doses, which are hoped to be available by mid-2021.

VALNEVA

This is a traditional vaccine as opposed to BioNtech's more innovative design. The immune system is sure to be exposed to an inactivated version of the coronavirus.

Up to 190 million doses are promised in the UK, although it has not yet been tested in humans. Up to 100 million of these are to be produced in the company's factories in Livingston, near Edinburgh. It is unlikely to be available until the end of next year.

GSK / SANOFI

British drug giant GlaxoSmithKline has reportedly made millions of doses of a "booster" for three vaccines.

The company offers its adjuvant technology and has partnered with Sanofi, Medicago and Clover Pharmaceuticals. The first results on whether any of the three traditional protein-based vaccines will work are expected in the first half of next year.

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