TOP TRENDING

NHS may need to use beds in CARE HOMES if pressures continue to worsen


NHS hospitals may need to start moving patients to nursing homes if the coronavirus continues to put pressure on their wards, a senior health official warned today.

Chris Hopson, head of the NHS Providers health union, warned that some hospitals are already almost full and are looking for beds elsewhere for their patients.

"You know that there is still spare capacity in the nursing and care sector," he said. “You are in the middle of a conversation with colleagues from nursing and nursing homes to see if they can access this capacity.

"It literally leaves no stone unturned in order to maximize every single piece of capacity we have in these areas under pressure."

If nursing homes are turned into overflow wards for hospitals, it is likely that only non-Covid patients will be sent to them after the first wave sparked a government policy of recovering from coronaviruses sent to nursing homes where they were feared Triggered murder outbreaks.

Shocking numbers from last night showed the number of Covid patients in UK hospitals surged over 30,000 on Jan. 4th – the latest data. That was a 27 percent increase in one week, beating the worst number of 21,700 in April 2020.

And hospital stays are only expected to increase further after health chiefs announced more than 50,000 new infections yesterday for the ninth time in a row.

An intensive professor in London warned the situation in hospitals was "definitely worse than the first wave" as the capital grapples with increasing cases.

And the capital's medical director, Vin Diwakar, said that even in a "best-case" scenario, they could be overwhelmed in less than two weeks. Even if coronavirus patients were least likely to grow and increase capacity – including the opening of the nightingale – the NHS would still have 2,000 general, acute and ICU beds by Jan. 19, it was reported.

Hospitals across England are seeing more coronavirus patients than in the first wave in 2020 (Image: ICU staff at St. George & # 39; s Hospital in London)

Some hospitals are nearing the breaking point and preparing to turn to nursing homes for help, said the executive director of NHS Providers. The number of Covid-19 patients in the hospital had risen to over 30,000 by January 4, according to NHS data

There are now more than 30,000 people with coronavirus in hospital. This is around a third more than the worst day during the first wave last spring (Image: A patient was rushed to the Royal London Hospital yesterday).

There are now more than 30,000 people with coronavirus in hospital. This is around a third more than the worst day during the first wave last spring (Image: A patient was rushed to the Royal London Hospital yesterday).

On BBC Radio 4 this morning, Mr Hopson said the situation was escalating "very quickly".

"We saw 5,000 new patients in hospital beds with Covid-19 in the last week. That's 10 full hospitals with new Covid patients in just seven days. So there is a really big challenge."

LONDON'S HOSPITALS "TO BE WARMED IN TWO WEEKS"

London's hospitals will be overwhelmed by Covid-19 in less than two weeks, even in a "best-case" scenario, an official briefing warns.

NHS London Medical Director Vin Diwakar delivered the worrying analysis to medical directors of the capital's hospital trusts this afternoon via a Zoom call.

Even if coronavirus patients were least likely to grow and capacity increased – including the opening of the nightingale – the NHS would still have 2,000 general, acute, and ICU beds by Jan. 19, the HSJ reports.

The report contains three scenarios: "Best", "Average" and "Worse". These are responsible for the effects of a daily growth of four percent, a growth of five percent and a growth of six percent.

The growth for beds was 3.5 percent on January 5, and 4.8 percent for intensive care beds, the report said.

He said the nightingales were not deployed – except in Manchester and Exeter – because they needed staff and snatched vital doctors and nurses away from overburdened wards and emergency units.

"It is better if we can access spare capacity in the nursing home sector because there are employees there," he said.

“We all know that if we want to do this, we really need to help with nursing and the nursing home.

“For example, if we want to discharge patients who need consistent access to quality therapy, we need to make sure that our nonprofit services can provide that support.

“We also know that we need to provide additional nursing support if we are to discharge patients whose visual acuity may be slightly higher than normal.

"The problem is that we are now at a point where we cannot treat the patients we need to treat in the NHS if we do not have access to that capacity."

Professor Rupert Pearse, a consultant in the capital, also told the program how the staff in London are already reaching their limits.

"It's definitely worse than the first wave and proving to be a lot harder to deal with now that we don't have the resources we had in the first wave," he warned.

Chris Hopson, executive director of NHS Providers, warned about spiral approvals

Chris Hopson, executive director of NHS Providers, warned about spiral approvals

"So we really care about the quality of patient care we think we deserve." And the effects of the pandemic are eliminating other diseases like cancer and heart disease. & # 39;

MailOnline contacted NHS England to ask how nursing homes could be used to relieve the central hospitals.

Intensive care patients are already being transferred from the regions most affected to regions with spare capacity.

Some doctors are currently considering moving the seriously ill from London and the south-east to Yorkshire and the south-west.

The President of the Intensive Care Society, Dr. Stephen Webb said yesterday that around 10 ICU patients are being moved every day.

Most of these are moved to and from hospitals in the same regions, he said, but a small number can be moved between regions.

NHS statistics show that people under the age of 40 rarely die from Covid-19, with 100 of the 17,572 deaths in November and December in that age group

NHS statistics show that people under the age of 40 rarely die from Covid-19, with 100 of the 17,572 deaths in November and December in that age group

Nurses and doctors work on wards at University College Hospital, London (pictured above)

Nurses and doctors work on wards at University College Hospital, London (pictured above)

Usually, ICU patients are rarely relocated between hospitals.

Dr. Webb, who also works in the east of England, said: “The problem with sending patients north is that these units were really badly hit at the start of this wave and could be hit with the new variant. It's a very difficult situation.

"If the virus stays as it is, I fear much more that we will hit the intensive care saturation point, but we still have some time." We have capacities in other parts of the country, but not much.

& # 39; Currently, many intensive care units in the east of England, the south-east and London are already saturated. Here we see the daily export of patients. but at the moment this is mostly local.

“So it could be a few miles between the London hospitals. We try to avoid moving patients, and we always try to move the least ill of our ICU patients. You will be transferred with all the equipment necessary to stay alive, accompanied by an intensive care doctor and a nurse. & # 39;

After it became known yesterday evening that the London hospitals could be overwhelmed by Covid-19 in less than two weeks, even in a "best-case" scenario.

NHS London Medical Director Vin Diwakar conveyed the worrying analysis to heads of the capital's hospital trusts via a Zoom call yesterday afternoon.

Even if coronavirus patients were least likely to grow and increase capacity – including the opening of the nightingale – the NHS would still have 2,000 general, acute, and intensive care beds by Jan. 19, the HSJ reported.

The report contains three scenarios: "Best", "Average" and "Worse". These are responsible for the effects of a daily growth of four percent, a growth of five percent and a growth of six percent.

The growth for beds was 3.5 percent on January 5, and 4.8 percent for intensive care beds, the report said.

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Messages (t) NHS (t) Coronavirus