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NHS chief warns of super Saturday "Pub-Ageddon"


Drunken thugs are locked up if they get upset on "Super Saturday", Matt Hancock warned last night.

The health minister told the mail that the British could "definitely go to the bar" today, but they had to be sensible.

He added, "You could end up behind bars if you break the law."

NHS chief Sir Simon Stevens also called for restraint and not "pub-aged" when bars and restaurants have opened for the first time in more than three months.

In the mail, he wrote that doctors and nurses didn't want "drunk and messy" hospitals to flood.

The double intervention preceded the greatest easing of restrictions since a comprehensive national ban was imposed in late March.

NHS chief Sir Simon Stevens also called for restraint and not "pub-aged" when bars and restaurants have opened for the first time in more than three months

Drunken thugs are locked up if they get into turmoil on "Super Saturday", Health Minister Matt Hancock (left) warned last night. NHS chief Sir Simon Stevens (right) also called for reluctance and not "pub-aged" when bars and restaurants have opened for the first time in more than three months

The health minister told the mail that the British could "definitely go to the bar" today, but they had to be sensible. Pictured: BrewDog Tower Hill staff finish preparations for tomorrow's opening with plastic grids on tables

The health minister told the mail that the British could "definitely go to the bar" today, but they had to be sensible. Pictured: BrewDog Tower Hill staff finish preparations for tomorrow's opening with plastic grids on tables

Bartender Michael Fitzsimons wears PSA as he pours a beer behind a bar shield during his final preparations at The Faltering Fullback Pub in North London before it reopens

Bartender Michael Fitzsimons wears PSA as he pours a beer behind a bar shield during his final preparations at The Faltering Fullback Pub in North London before it reopens

The George at Eton, Windsor, Berkshire had a staff training evening tonight as they prepared to reopen their bar tomorrow

The George at Eton, Windsor, Berkshire had a staff training evening tonight as they prepared to reopen their bar tomorrow

The Corner Ale & Cider House in Windsor, Berkshire, is preparing to reopen its pub tomorrow, which was billed as "Super Saturday".

The Corner Ale & Cider House in Windsor, Berkshire, is preparing to reopen its pub tomorrow, which was billed as "Super Saturday".

Boris Johnson issued his own warning last night, asking the public not to "blow" it by throwing caution into the wind.

He said that today was "our biggest step on the road to recovery," but insisted that if ruthless behavior led to a resurgence of the coronavirus, he would reintroduce localized locks.

"In Leicester, we have resolutely taken steps to prevent infections from occurring," said the Prime Minister.

The health minister added: "When it comes to local measures, I will not avoid a shutdown if it is necessary for the safety of people – and this may include closing bars and pubs."

"I'm not a killjoy, but the virus can still kill." I don't want bars and pubs to close again. I like to go to the pub and enjoy a pints or two. "

The police and emergency services are preparing for chaos today. The pubs are allowed to open from 6 a.m. In some parts of the country, more officials were deployed than on New Year's Eve.

BrewDog Tower Hill employees are preparing tonight to reopen tomorrow with social distancing measures

BrewDog Tower Hill employees are preparing tonight to reopen tomorrow with social distancing measures

People on social media have joked about the number of bar visitors who will go to bars tomorrow on "Super Saturday"

People on social media have joked about the number of bar visitors who will go to bars tomorrow on "Super Saturday"

In other developments last night:

  • Greece, Spain, France and Belgium were placed on a list of 59 countries that the British can visit without having to quarantine for 14 days. The USA, Portugal and China were excluded;
  • Scotland's first minister Nicola Sturgeon claimed that the government's airlift and quarantine policies were "shambolic".
  • Scientists warned that the R rate in London may have risen above 1.
  • Mr. Hancock pledged "the largest flu protection program in history" to prepare for the risk of a second wave of corona viruses.
  • It is believed that only half of the country's 28,000 pubs are reopened today.
  • Official figures showed that almost 30,000 more deaths occurred in nursing homes during the pandemic than in 2019;
  • The total death toll rose to 44,131, with a further 137 confirmed yesterday.
  • The UK has been claimed to be in talks to join an EU plan to ensure the supply of potential coronavirus vaccines.
  • The Prime Minister said cricket could resume next weekend and suggested using face masks in queues and in a confined space.

Mr. Hancock promised 100 percent support for chiefs of police who are tasked with stopping the Super Saturday incident.

BrewDog Tower Hill staff in London are preparing the pub's menu to reopen tomorrow

BrewDog Tower Hill staff in London are preparing the pub's menu to reopen tomorrow

Pubs and restaurants, many of which have already been taken away, can be fully reopened on July 4 after months of closure due to the Covid 19 pandemic

Pubs and restaurants, many of which have already been taken away, can be fully reopened on July 4 after months of closure due to the Covid 19 pandemic

When asked whether the courts should take a hard line with idiots who drink alcohol, he said, “Of course there is a law for a reason. The government would not shy away from closing pubs if there was irresponsible behavior. "

The British Medical Association has urged revelers to act responsibly as it is feared that the number of alcohol-related casualties in the emergency room could increase significantly.

Sir Patrick Vallance, the chief scientific advisor, also warned at a press conference about the risk of the "spread" of the corona virus in pubs.

And Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer, said, “This virus is far from being gone, it is far from being gone. Nobody who observes this believes that this is a risk-free next step. "

In his article for the mail, Sir Simon urged the public to "exercise restraint" today.

He said: "Our A&E doctors, nurses and paramedics absolutely don't want to see a so-called" pubageddon "- with hospitals flooded with drunks and untidy people."

Boris & # 39; local blocking danger: When pubs open doors for the first time in 14 weeks, PM warns the public: Don't blow

BY JOHN STEVENS, GEORGE ODLING AND SEAN POULTER FOR THE DAILY MAIL

Boris Johnson told the nation "don't blow" when the pubs reopened today for the first time in three months – and threatened with further local closures if the virus increased.

The police are preparing for the mess called "Super Saturday". In some parts of the country more civil servants are deployed than on New Year's Eve.

Pubs and restaurants in England can start trading again from 6 a.m. The Prime Minister calls this the "biggest step so far" back to normal.

A schedule for the reopening of other closed venues, including gyms and swimming pools, will be released next week, along with instructions for mass gatherings such as concerts.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the nation "don't blow up" when pubs reopened today for the first time in three months - and threatened to continue with local closures if the virus increased

Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the nation "don't blow up" when pubs reopened today for the first time in three months – and threatened to continue with local closures if the virus increased

Starting next weekend, people will be allowed to play cricket again. However, Mr. Johnson was cautious yesterday and urged the public to "enjoy the summer sensibly."

He warned that local hotspots could be blocked again if the coronavirus infections suddenly increased. Mr. Johnson said: "We are making progress, we think we are in good shape, but my message is that we do not screw it up."

At a press conference on Downing Street, he added: "As we take this next step – our biggest step on the road to recovery so far – I urge the British people to do it safely."

He warned that the country was "not yet out of the forest".

And he insisted that he would "not hesitate" to reintroduce restrictions if infection rates rose again, with local locks like the one in Leicester being "a feature of our lives for some time".

"The success of these companies, the livelihood of those who depend on them, and ultimately the economic health of the whole country depend on each of us acting responsibly," he said. "We can't let them down."

Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer, was also very cautious.

He said the likelihood of a second wave of infection would increase "very, very strongly" if people didn't follow the rules.

He added: “This virus is far from being gone, it is far from being gone. Nobody who observes this believes that this is a risk-free next step. We have to be absolutely serious. "

According to the new laws published yesterday, pubs can reopen at 6 a.m. today. However, you can only serve alcohol during normal licensing hours, and the reopening time has been set to avoid people drinking shortly after midnight.

New laws also empower the police to break up gatherings of more than 30 people.

Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer, was also very cautious. He said the likelihood of a second wave of infection would increase "very, very strongly" if people didn't follow the rules. He added: “This virus is far from being gone, it is far from being gone. Nobody who observes this believes that this is a risk-free next step. We have to be absolutely serious. "

Professor Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer, was also very cautious. He said the likelihood of a second wave of infection would increase "very, very strongly" if people didn't follow the rules. He added: “This virus is far from being gone, it is far from being gone. Nobody who observes this believes that this is a risk-free next step. We have to be absolutely serious. "

Police chiefs yesterday warned that anyone who violated the rules this weekend could be prosecuted and pubs closed.

Ambulance services are expected to be so overwhelmed that the ambulance chiefs asked people to call 999 only when it is life-threatening.

West Midlands Labor Police and Commissioner for Police David Jamieson said he was hoping for bad weather when he warned that the decision to reopen pubs on Saturday was a recipe for a "serious disruption."

He added: “If the weather is bad, the problems we have are a little less. So we pray for rain. "

Scotland Yard commander Bas Javid urged drinkers in the capital to be responsible and said it was important "we don't lose track of how far we've all got".

Police in Leicester, the first city to be closed on-site, fear that people might go to nearby Nottingham for a drink and patrol train stations in both cities to interview passengers.

Rachel Kearton, head of the National Police Chief for Alcohol Damage, said she expected New Year's Eve celebrations, but people should be ready to change plans or go home when the venues are too crowded.

Yesterday, the Prime Minister vowed to move away from "blanket measures" and instead use local barriers to fight Covid.

He outlined a five-step plan for dealing with regional outbreaks.

First, government scientists will be hunted for local hotspots, second, NHS Test and Trace will try to develop a deeper understanding of them, and thirdly, additional tests will be used to deal with the problem.

The fourth step would use restrictions, e.g. B. closing individual premises, and in the fifth step local locks are introduced if the problem persists.

Mr. Johnson also suggested that people should consider using facewear when queuing.

& # 39; This is not just another illness for me. Friends have died. I got out lightly. "Matt Hancock reveals his own struggles with the corona virus when critics beat the Minister of Health over" more promising and too little success ".

BY SIMON WALTERS FOR THE DAILY MAIL

The first sign that Matt Hancock felt that he was trying to fight the coronavirus was when he noticed that Ms. Martha was examining his thinning hair.

She selected a single gray strand and immediately pulled it out.

It was the last week of April, a great political and personal moment for the 41-year-old Minister of Health.

He was very relieved to achieve his much-touted goal of 100,000 Covid tests a day in hours. But it cost a bit: "We reached the goal, but I got my first gray hair!", He laughs.

Tiggerish Hancock loves to set political goals. However, when the results of the inevitable investigation into the government's handling of the pandemic are released, many expect it to be in the crosshairs.

He has been the subject of malicious sniffing from unnamed Downing St sources for allegedly being "promising and under-served" in the fight against the virus, the anti-Covid app fiasco, and clashes with the Prime Minister.

41-year-old Minister of Health Matt Hancock was very relieved to achieve his much-touted goal of 100,000 Covid tests a day with hours in the last week of May

41-year-old Minister of Health Matt Hancock was very relieved to achieve his much-touted goal of 100,000 Covid tests a day with hours in the last week of May

But Hancock was sitting in his office in the Westminster Health Department and didn't look like a man expecting the coronavirus cutlet.

In his first big interview since the crisis started in March, he warned drunken thugs who were in prison for abusing today's pub reopening and announced the biggest flu program ever to help the NHS take risks to prepare for a new Covid wave in winter.

In a rare public show of emotions, he spoke openly about how the crisis made him rethink his approach to politics and life.

Hancock, a father of three, was knocked down by Covid at the same time as Boris Johnson, saying that it was a "terrible" experience even though he was back at his desk in a week.

"I couldn't swallow, eat, or drink for two days. It was like having broken glass in your throat."

Hancock believes it helped him get over it quickly when he was slim – he's six feet tall and twelve pounds seven pounds. "Thin people get through better than fat people," he said.

Could he keep up with Boris Johnson's theatrical performance of one or two pushups in front of the cameras in his Downing Street study?

Hancock believes it helped him get over it quickly when he was slim - he's six feet tall and twelve pounds seven pounds

Hancock believes it helped him get over it quickly when he was slim – he's six feet tall and twelve pounds seven pounds

"I'm not competing with the Prime Minister," Hancock replied shyly before adding, "I can maybe do 25."

Three of Hancock's friends have been lost to Covid: economics professor Deepak Lal; Sir Peter Sinclair, who taught him when he came to the Bank of England after graduation; and British envoy Steven Dick, who worked as secretary for culture, media and sports for Hancock.

"This is really important to me," he said. "This is not just another disease and it is not just a political problem." I really feel the effects personally. People whom I admire and respect have died. Friends. I got out lightly. "

Hancock is planning a quiet super Saturday: a pint of beer with his brother Chris – and a haircut. And in a reasonably responsible style (unlike Boris Johnson's reckless father Stanley), he booked a family stay in Cornwall in August.

He has often been accused of paying more attention to political games than principles. No more, he said: "I have learned how important it is to rise above a part of politics … to come and go."

He defended his record in curbing the virus, but it's clear that Britain has one of the most casualties in the world.

And most experts admit that there were mistakes in delaying the initial lockout and not protecting the elderly in nursing homes, and that tests and apps were botched. Hancock will be the case type, not Johnson or the scientists; it's on his watch, I suggested.

“Everyone did the best possible job. We made the decisions we made together. We have tried to use all the information that is available to you and to make the best decisions that you can make together. "

Minister of Health Matt Hancock with horse Star of Bengal after riding with the Clarehaven Stables in Newmarket

Minister of Health Matt Hancock with horse Star of Bengal after riding with the Clarehaven Stables in Newmarket

Note that he uses the words "together", "together" and "all information available to you".

A cynic's translation could read, "I could be the health minister, but everything I did was signed by the prime minister, so don't blame me." And if I made mistakes, it's because the scientists gave me the wrong information. "

Was he tall enough to admit that he had personally done some things wrong? He replied cautiously: "We are constantly learning …" I interjected: "You threw older people into nursing homes, thousands died." He replied: "That was not the case."

Finally, he admitted that there were things he wished he had done differently. He regrets that, for example, he has prohibited relatives from attending relatives' funerals.

But he insisted that he had done many things right. "I was told there is nothing we can do about it … the NHS will be overwhelmed." But we protected the NHS. "

Refusing to apologize for losing his coolness when interrupted by BBC Radio's Nick Robinson, he insists, "Let me speak!"

"What concerns me is injustice," he said of Robinson's constant interruptions. "When people are unfair, I find it frustrating."

He conspicuously failed to reject reports he had protested against Johnson and said in a row about the government's treatment of viruses: "Give me a break!"

Some of Johnson's allies have always been suspicious of Hancock, a retainer and a member of Johnson Cameron's / George Osborne's inner circle, despised by Johnson.

At last year's leadership competition, Hancock attacked Johnson's call to force Parliament to enforce Brexit and sided with journalist Charlotte Edwardes, who said Johnson fondled her at a dinner party.

When Hancock's own leadership challenge failed, he shamelessly supported hot favorite Johnson.

Spectator editor Fraser Nelson said Tory critics consider him a "sycophant who crawls up to anyone in power".

Hancock replied without blushing: "Guilty as accused. I am a team player. "Piers Morgan described him as" pathetic, pious, unhappy, hypocritical, imperious school prefect. " I can't deny the last one, "roared Hancock.

Not everyone wants to get it.

He proudly indicated that the chic blue tie from John Lewis he was wearing for the interview was sent to him by a voter who suspected in a pink tie of his regular appearances at press conferences in Downing Street that he was none other would have.

Hancock said his first political and business lesson came when his mother Shirley and stepfather Bob's high-tech family business faced bankruptcy in his hometown of Cheshire after a customer failed to pay an invoice on time.

As an avowed geek, he wrote computer codes for the company from the age of 15.

"We hoped every day that the check would come and when the postman came I ran away from the breakfast table. I can still hear the sound of this mailbox.

When the check came, mom took it straight to the bank and the business survived. I was wondering how a perfectly successful company can go under because something is completely out of their control.

Spectator editor Fraser Nelson said Tory critics see Matt Hancock as a "sycophant who crawls on anyone in power."

Piers Morgan called him a "pathetic, pious, unfortunate, hypocritical, imperious school prefect".

Spectator editor Fraser Nelson (left) said Tory critics see Matt Hancock as a "sycophant who crawls on everyone in power". Piers Morgan called him a "pathetic, pious, unfortunate, hypocritical, imperious school prefect".

"That's why my heart goes out to companies that have been hit so hard by this crisis."

After barely a day off for five months, he is keen to have time with his own children.

He was amused when his daughter asked for help studying at home, only to find out that it was an essay on politics.

It was less likely that he also worked as a student as a "horse catcher" in the Grand National in nearby Liverpool.

“My job was to stand next to a big jump and catch the horse when a jockey fell off. I gave a jockey a leg up a year and he finished the race. After that they changed the rules! "

The naughtiest thing he'll admit is fibbing as a student sports radio reporter in his days in Oxford.

Due to a report on a rugby game in England in Twickenham, he slept through and submitted his reports to watch on television in a pub in Reading while pretending to be a part of the game.

"I went into a phone booth opposite the pub and said," Here I am, living in Twickenham while the teams enter the field. The crowd is enthusiastic about applause! "He laughs, mimicking the chatter of a commentator.

However, it is not the latest "naughty" thing he has done. When we discussed his attempts to contain drunken scenes in pubs today, he admitted that he had been drunk himself for Christmas only six months ago, and declined to provide further details.

But Hancock promised 100 percent support for chiefs of police who are tasked with stopping "Super Saturday", leading to inflammatory behavior.

When asked whether judges and judges should take a hard line with alcohol-filled idiots who start bar fights, he said, "Of course there is a law for a reason."

When Hancock participated in a charity horse race in Newmarket in 2012, home to the British flat race in his West Suffolk constituency, top jockey Frankie Dettori gave him tactical tips. "I was told to sit behind what I thought would win, pull me back after two furlongs, and get started."

It sounds like a metaphor for his political rise, I suggested.

"I won the race," he grinned.

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