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NHS bosses warn Boris Johnson that a relaxation of the Covid rules over Christmas could trigger the third wave


NHS chiefs have warned Boris Johnson that easing Covid restrictions over Christmas could cause cases to spiral out of control again.

Under the government's plans for a more normal Christmas season, families can "bubble" with two other households between December 23rd and 27th.

And in November the Prime Minister promised several areas subject to the government's strictest lockdown rules will be moved to level two before the end of this week.

However, Chris Hopson, executive director of the NHS, has urged Mr. Johnson to use "extreme caution" before a region is downgraded as a relaxation of the rules "will trigger a third wave".

Instead, he insisted that areas like London – which have 211 cases per 10,000 people each week – should be moved to level three to get the numbers under control. He also said Essex, Kent and Lincolnshire have shown worrying numbers.

Mr Hopson – the executive director of NHS Providers, which represents trusts across the country – said the current surge in cases was "worrying", especially towards the end of England's second nationwide lockdown.

The country's case count rose 21,502 yesterday – a 38 percent increase from 15,539 last Saturday. Saturday's death toll of 519 is a 30.7 percent increase from the 397 deaths recorded that same day last week.

In other coronavirus developments:

  • Councils, under England's toughest coronavirus restrictions, will roll out rapid community testing programs to lower Covid-19 transmission rates this winter.
  • Doctors who will give the Pfizer / BioNtech vaccine next week have been told to give priority to elderly ethnic minority patients and patients with underlying health conditions if there is high demand for the vaccine.
  • Nadra Ahmed, chair of the National Care Association, said up to 40 percent of nursing home workers could choose not to take the coronavirus vaccine as it will be rolled out in the coming days.
  • Protesters took to the streets of London, Edinburgh, Manchester and Brighton yesterday to protest the lockdown as part of the UK's mass vaccination program.
  • Researchers have found that coronavirus lateral flow tests only catch 49 percent of infections because they can't catch people with low virus levels.
  • SAGE, Number 10's Scientific Advisory Group on Emergencies, estimated the R-number to be 0.9 to 1.0 across the UK, after rising from 0.8 to 1.0 a week ago.

The UK's main streets (Regent Street, pictured yesterday) have been filled with eager Christmas shoppers as the country's total cases increased by 21,502 - a 38 percent increase from last Saturday

The UK's main streets (Regent Street, pictured yesterday) have been filled with eager Christmas shoppers as the country's total cases increased by 21,502 – a 38 percent increase from last Saturday

Eager night owls flocked to the streets of York on Saturday night. A group enjoys music from a live street musician

Eager night owls flocked to the streets of York on Saturday night. A group enjoys music from a live street musician

A couple kiss on the streets of York as countless partiers rushed to enjoy a Saturday night

A couple kiss on the streets of York as countless partiers rushed to enjoy a Saturday night

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates a total of 481,500 patients had coronavirus in the seven days ended December 5, compared with 521,300 the week before (8 percent).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates a total of 481,500 patients had coronavirus in the seven days ended December 5, compared with 521,300 the week before (8 percent).

The fall rate per 100,000 inhabitants of the capital was 191.8 on December 6, compared to 158.1 in the previous week

The fall rate per 100,000 inhabitants of the capital was 191.8 on December 6, compared to 158.1 in the previous week

Weekly data from Public Health England shows that in many areas in London, east and south-east, infection rates have increased since the lockdown ended and Tier 3 rules could apply from next week

Weekly data from Public Health England shows that in many areas in London, east and south-east, infection rates have increased since the lockdown ended and Tier 3 rules could apply from next week

Party-goers in Christmas hats were seen walking the streets of Soho, London. London belongs to the second tier, which means that alcoholic beverages can be served at bars with large meals

Party-goers in Christmas hats were seen walking the streets of Soho, London. London belongs to the second tier, which means that alcoholic beverages can be served at bars with large meals

The lively bars and restaurants in London were full on Saturday night as the night owls got into the Christmas spirit

The lively bars and restaurants in London were full on Saturday night as the night owls got into the Christmas spirit

If you manage to get London Tier 3 it will wreak havoc, Tory MPs warn

London's Tory MPs have urged Boris Johnson not to do “immeasurable damage” to the capital by placing it on Tier 3 suspension this week.

In a letter The Mail saw on Sunday, MPs urged the Prime Minister to go easy on the capital, as the closure would harm not only Londoners but also “people across the country” who are “prosperous and Our big city's prosperity "depend".

A decision on whether to plunge London into the highest lockdown before Christmas was on the agenda this weekend. After objections from the police and local councils to the plans to divide London into different levels, a dispute arose with the ministers.

With the capital's businesses saying Tier 3 would hit the economy a £ 3 billion blow, ministers like Michael Gove have suggested that only the outskirts of London with the highest infection rates should be included in the top tier.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock is also believed to be considering dividing the hardest-hit parts of the capital into Tier 3, but leaving the majority of the city in Tier 2.

This would mean restaurants and other hospitality businesses in London's West End could stay open while those in suburbs would close.

In a letter to the Prime Minister seen by The Times, Mr. Hopson wrote: “We are now seeing worrying increases in infection rates in a variety of areas.

"Leader of confidence are concerned that easing restrictions will trigger a third wave if infection rates stay as high as they are now."

It comes after scientists urged the British to rethink Christmas gatherings that aren't worth the risk.

Main streets were filled with eager Christmas shoppers yesterday as Covid-tired financiers gave hard-hit UK businesses a £ 1.7 billion boost.

But top scientists have said families should avoid gatherings that "could infect the vulnerable and elderly we love".

Professor Devi Sridhar, the Chair of Global Public Health at the University of Edinburgh, told the Guardian, "If people are (not) careful, we will pay for our Christmas parties with locks in January and February."

"With a vaccine in a few weeks, why should we run the risk of infecting vulnerable and elderly people we love?"

Professor Susan Mitchie, a psychologist at University College London and a member of SAGE, added, "You have to respond to the situation as it is, not the situation we would like it to be."

And Professor Stephen Reicher, government advisor in the SAGE public health compliance sub-group, warned that a plea by Health Secretary Matt Hancock to abide by the rules "totally misses the point" .

"The danger is, when you say people can, you are implying that it is safe and therefore they should," he said.

Professor Reicher added that the government council should choose to meet with loved ones but warn that it is "dangerous" and should only be done when necessary.

NHS manager Chris Hopson (pictured) has urged Boris Johnson "to use extreme caution" before any region is downgraded, stating that any relaxation of the rules "will trigger a third wave".

Boris Johnson

Chris Hopson (left), executive director of the NHS, has urged Boris Johnson "to use extreme caution" before a region is downgraded, saying that any relaxation of the rules "will trigger a third wave".

Scientists urged the British to reconsider Christmas gatherings that aren't worth the risk as the country's total cases rise by 21,502 - a 38 percent increase from last Saturday's level. Pictured: On Saturday night, drinkers gathered in Soho

Scientists urged the British to reconsider Christmas gatherings that aren't worth the risk as the country's total cases rise by 21,502 – a 38 percent increase from last Saturday's level. Pictured: On Saturday night, drinkers gathered in Soho

Main streets were filled with eager Christmas shoppers yesterday as Covid-tired financiers gave hard-hit UK businesses a £ 1.7 billion boost. Pictured: Diners in Soho

Main streets were filled with eager Christmas shoppers yesterday as Covid-tired financiers gave hard-hit UK businesses a £ 1.7 billion boost. Pictured: Diners in Soho

Top scientists said families should avoid gatherings that "run the risk of infecting the vulnerable and elderly we love" amid fears that Covid cases could spiral out of control again. Pictured: Diners in Soho, some with Christmas hats

Top scientists said families should avoid gatherings that "run the risk of infecting the vulnerable and elderly we love" amid fears that Covid cases could spiral out of control again. Pictured: Diners in Soho, some with Christmas hats

Families across the UK can create a Christmas bubble between December 23rd and 27th, spending the Christmas season with no more than three households. Pictured: Saturday shoppers on Regent Street

Families across the UK can create a Christmas bubble between December 23rd and 27th, spending the Christmas season with no more than three households. Pictured: Saturday shoppers on Regent Street

Experts have warned that the government is sending the "wrong message" by only asking families to "follow the rules". Some suggest that a third wave of infections could be triggered in the New Year. Pictured: shoppers and a man dressed as Santa Claus on Regent Street

Experts have warned that the government is sending the "wrong message" by only asking families to "follow the rules". Some suggest that a third wave of infections could be triggered in the New Year. Pictured: shoppers and a man dressed as Santa Claus on Regent Street

Areas like London (Regent Street on Saturday, pictured) that are at risk of entering Tier 3 have seen a surge in infections - with a case rate per 100,000 people of 191.8 on December 6, versus 158.1 in the Previous week

Areas like London (Regent Street on Saturday, pictured) that are at risk of entering Tier 3 have seen a surge in infections – with a case rate per 100,000 people of 191.8 on December 6, versus 158.1 in the Previous week

Scientists are urging the British to reconsider their Christmas plans, insisting that the best way to keep their loved ones safe is not to see them. Pictured: Christmas shoppers on Regent Street

Scientists are urging the British to reconsider their Christmas plans, insisting that the best way to keep their loved ones safe is not to see them. Pictured: Christmas shoppers on Regent Street

According to the researchers, Covid lateral flow tests only capture 49 percent of infections

Coronavirus lateral flow tests only capture 49 percent of infections because they can't catch people with low virus levels, researchers have found.

The results of a pilot project involving 3,199 people have blasted a hole in the government's mass testing strategy, which included plans to run millions of 30-minute tests so Brits could live normally again. This was announced yesterday.

The lateral flow test carried out by Innova in the USA records only 48.89 percent of active infections, according to a pilot program at the University of Liverpool.

It contradicts previous laboratory tests that found the test to have an overall sensitivity of 76.8 percent, increasing to 95 percent in those with high viral loads.

The pilot's results come after a review by the Mail which found four large nursing home chains and nine city councilors refused to use rapid visitor tests to see if they could be admitted into premises due to concerns about their accuracy.

Last week, according to a Daily Mail campaign, the government promised that by the end of next week millions of "lateral flow tests" will be introduced in nursing homes to help reunite residents and families.

It was said that visitors who tested negative for Covid are likely to keep relatives for the first time in months.

But big vendors like Bupa, MHA, Barchester Care, and Anchor Hanover have all refused to trust the results of the tests.

He said, “There may be circumstances where there are other factors that lead you to believe that it is worth taking this risk – but people need to do it in order to know and be clear about what it is Risk is.

Linda Bauld of the University of Edinburgh has also warned that easing Covid restrictions for five days over the Christmas period is a "mistake" that will have "consequences".

She said, “I think people need to consider very carefully whether they can see their loved ones outside or in a very humble way. I also worry about travel, people moving from high to low prevalence areas. & # 39;

She told BBC Breakfast yesterday: “I think there will be consequences. I fully understand why governments do this. Behavioral, people are fed up.

"When you meet people from other households indoors, the ventilation is poor, maybe older family members are in those bubbles, unfortunately because the virus hasn't been cleared … I think that means that Christmas time is a risk.

"From a public health perspective, I have to be completely honest, I think that's a mistake."

It comes as Christmas shoppers were warned to be cautious as London was about to move into Tier 3 amid a surge in coronavirus cases.

Teenagers were blamed for the huge surge in cases, which led to a mass testing program being introduced in secondary schools in the hardest hit districts.

The London fall rate per 100,000 population, which rose to 191.8 on December 6, means the capital is ahead of regions like the West Midlands that are already subject to Tier 3 restrictions.

The Mayor of London yesterday told Christmas shoppers to stay away from public transport and wear face masks at all times if they are making £ 1.7 billion on the High Street.

Mr Khan urged buyers "to keep a two-meter distance wherever possible" to prevent the capital from falling into the toughest restrictions next week.

In a joint statement with Cllr Rachael Robathan, chairman of Westminster City Council, he said: “We appeal directly to Londoners – when shopping it is important that you follow the rules.

“You have to wear face covering in shops and keep a distance of two meters wherever possible. Avoid using public transport during rush hour and walk and cycle where you can. If you have symptoms – don't take any chances or go out. Immediately self-isolate and have it tested.

“Companies across London have worked very hard to make their premises Covid-proof – but we must all do our part to ensure compliance. So shop safely this weekend. & # 39;

Christmas shoppers have been warned to be cautious as London was about to move into Tier 3 amid an increase in coronavirus cases. Pictured: Christmas shoppers on Regent Street on Saturday

Christmas shoppers have been warned to be cautious as London was about to move into Tier 3 amid an increase in coronavirus cases. Pictured: Christmas shoppers on Regent Street on Saturday

Many shoppers could be seen in Oxford Street in London yesterday. London is at risk of Tier 3 coronavirus restrictions before Christmas

Many shoppers could be seen in Oxford Street in London yesterday. London is at risk of Tier 3 coronavirus restrictions before Christmas

Christmas shoppers walk down Regent Street on December 12th. In the run-up to Christmas, crowds streamed into stores that were not really needed

Christmas shoppers walk down Regent Street on December 12th. In the run-up to Christmas, crowds streamed into stores that were not really needed

Masked shoppers were seen on Oxford Street in London yesterday. London's fall rate per 100,000 population, which rose to 191.8 on December 6, means the capital is ahead of regions like the West Midlands that are already subject to Tier 3 restrictions

Masked shoppers were seen on Oxford Street in London yesterday. London's fall rate per 100,000 population, which rose to 191.8 on December 6, means the capital is ahead of regions like the West Midlands that are already subject to Tier 3 restrictions

On Friday, Boris Johnson's spokesman urged buyers to be careful.

When asked by MailOnline whether high street shoppers should be careful, he said "absolutely".

The UK's daily coronavirus cases increased 33 percent on Friday compared to seven days ago.

A total of 21,672 new cases were announced, up from 20,964 on Thursday.

Mr Johnson's spokesman urged the public to follow the safety guidelines, saying, “I think we have been clear throughout the pandemic.

"We urge the public to follow the guidelines in relation to their activities to ensure we can further reduce the transmission rate and protect communities."

However, he stopped telling buyers to avoid busy times.

"I wouldn't go into the discussions to tell people how to shop, but I would just repeat what we would say to make sure people are following the guidelines in place," he said.

Reaching Tier 3 in London will cause catastrophic damage to Tory MPs – as Hancock is considering dividing up the capital to keep the West End open while hitting the hardest hit areas with strict restrictions

By Brendan Carlin and Anna Mikhailova for the Post am Sonntag

London's Tory MPs have urged Boris Johnson not to do “immeasurable damage” to the capital by placing it on Tier 3 suspension this week.

In a letter The Mail saw on Sunday, MPs urged the Prime Minister to go easy on the capital, as the closure would harm not only Londoners but also “people across the country” who are “prosperous and Our big city's prosperity "depend".

A decision on whether to plunge London into the highest lockdown before Christmas was on the agenda this weekend. After objections from the police and local councils to the plans to divide London into different levels, a dispute arose with the ministers.

London's Tory MPs have urged Boris Johnson not to do “immeasurable damage” to the capital by placing it on Tier 3 suspension this week

London's Tory MPs have urged Boris Johnson not to do “immeasurable damage” to the capital by placing it on Tier 3 suspension this week

With the capital's businesses saying Tier 3 would hit the economy a £ 3 billion blow, ministers like Michael Gove have suggested that only the outskirts of London with the highest infection rates should be included in the top tier.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock is also believed to be considering dividing the hardest-hit parts of the capital into Tier 3, but leaving the majority of the city in Tier 2.

This would mean restaurants and other hospitality businesses in London's West End could stay open while those in suburbs would close.

Andrew Bridgen, MP for North-West Leicestershire Tory, announced that Mr Hancock had already told him that a more local approach would be taken in his area.

Nov 7: An outbreak in Sheppey East that saw cases increase 144 percent and the Swale area had a rolling rate of 303. HM Prison Swaleside is located near the village of Eastchurch on the Isle of Sheppey

Nov 7: An outbreak in Sheppey East that saw cases increase 144 percent and the Swale area had a rolling rate of 303. HM Prison Swaleside is located near the village of Eastchurch on the Isle of Sheppey

Nov 21: Infection rates on the Isle of Sheppey and surrounding areas in Kent rise to more than 400 cases per 100,000

Nov 21: Infection rates on the Isle of Sheppey and surrounding areas in Kent rise to more than 400 cases per 100,000

December 5: In areas between south London and Kent, cases are increasing in areas such as Dartford and Greenwich

December 5: In areas between south London and Kent, cases are increasing in areas such as Dartford and Greenwich

London's Tory MPs have urged Boris Johnson not to do “immeasurable damage” to the capital by placing it on Tier 3 suspension this week. Pictured: Christmas shoppers flock to Regent Street in London's West End on Saturday

London's Tory MPs have urged Boris Johnson not to do “immeasurable damage” to the capital by placing it on Tier 3 suspension this week. Pictured: Christmas shoppers flock to Regent Street in London's West End on Saturday

His local agency – currently in the same Tier 3 high virus area as the city of Leicester but with lower Covid rates – is likely to be placed in a lower category of controls this week.

Mr Bridgen said he texted Mr Hancock yesterday what he could do to help and the Minister of Health replied, "We are separating you from Leicester."

It came as:

  • The number of deaths recorded daily rose from 397 last Saturday to 519. There were 21,502 new positive cases, a 38 percent increase from last Saturday.
  • Scientists urged people to reconsider Christmas gatherings that aren't worth the risk.
  • London's Regent Street was packed with Christmas shoppers yesterday as the British were spending an estimated £ 3m per minute to give the High Street a boost as they feared a toy shortage was partly caused by the chaos in the UK ports.
  • Sixty-seven local authorities in the highest level 3 have been approved for rapid transit lateral flow testing to reduce infection rates.
  • US regulators approved the use of the Pfizer vaccine, but the European Medicines Agency seemed barely any closer to the green light.

In a pre-emptive strike ahead of a review of the capital's restrictions, six senior Conservatives signed the letter, organized by Harrow East MP Bob Blackman, warning that many London Tory MPs will be next month's review against the Covid- The government's approach might be right if the city is tier 3.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock is believed to be considering dividing the hardest-hit parts of the capital into Tier 3 but leaving the majority of the city in Tier 2

Separately, Nickie Aiken, the Conservative MP whose constituency includes the West End, said Tier 3 was a "disaster" for London and would destroy livelihoods.

Mr Blackman said last night that he supported the proposal to split London into tiers, adding: "The least affected areas should not be ruled by the worst affected areas."

He said he would vote against renewing the current anti-Covid regime next month if London were forced into Tier 3 and warned that many other London Tory MPs would do the same.

However, former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said it would be a "mistake" to even put some London boroughs in Tier 3.

Sir Iain, MP for Chingford and Woodford Green in northeast London, warned that the virus surge in his area was among school children, rather than the older population, who are at higher risk.

Weekly data from Public Health England shows that in many areas in London, east and south-east, infection rates have increased since the lockdown ended and Tier 3 rules could apply from next week

Weekly data from Public Health England shows that in many areas in London, east and south-east, infection rates have increased since the lockdown ended and Tier 3 rules could apply from next week

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates a total of 481,500 patients had coronavirus in the seven days ended December 5, compared with 521,300 the week before (8 percent).

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates a total of 481,500 patients had coronavirus in the seven days ended December 5, compared with 521,300 the week before (8 percent).

Andrew Bridgen, MP for North-West Leicestershire Tory, announced that Mr Hancock had already told him that a more local approach would be taken in his area

Former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said it would be a "mistake" to even put some London boroughs in Tier 3

Andrew Bridgen, MP for North-West Leicestershire Tory, announced that Mr Hancock had already told him that a more local approach would be taken in his area. Former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said it would be a "mistake" to even put some London boroughs in Tier 3

And Ms. Aiken said the approach of dividing the capital into different restricted areas was "almost impossible for the police".

Chancellor Rishi Sunak and Economy Minister Alok Sharma have voiced concerns about bringing the capital into Tier 3.

But police and councils say they are too overwhelmed to monitor movement between levels and fear it could cause public order issues.

MailOnline's analysis of government numbers shows that because of its size, London is currently registering more cases per day than 27 out of 61 authorities currently living under Tier 3 curbs, including Nottingham, Leeds, Leicestershire, Bristol, Newcastle and Derby

MailOnline's analysis of government numbers shows that because of its size, London is currently registering more cases per day than 27 out of 61 authorities currently living under Tier 3 curbs, including Nottingham, Leeds, Leicestershire, Bristol, Newcastle and Derby

Ministers will make the decision on Wednesday after studying the latest data. The changes will take effect on Saturday. You will be checked again after 14 days.

The MP's letter highlighted last month's government estimate that 550,000 jobs would have been at risk if London had been ranked Level 3 last month.

They warned: "It would be a wrong decision to put life against living when it comes to deciding what Covid restrictions to apply in London.

"We believe that the government can protect both lives and livelihoods by keeping our capital more open while fighting this terrible virus."

Your Essential Guide to Vaccine Adoption: Jab Venues, How to Get Your Appointment, and Who Has Priority

Thousands of people across the UK already had their first Covid-19 shocks when NHS teams used the first 800,000 doses of the revolutionary vaccine. And with a million more here soon, the Jab campaign is quickly gaining traction.

It is crucial that the general practitioners' practices begin their work as vaccination centers, while ten other hospitals have opened stab clinics.

Batches of the vaccine are distributed based on the size of the local population

Batches of the vaccine are distributed based on the size of the local population

HOW DO YOU GET YOUR APPOINTMENT?

Does it matter which part of the country I live in?

The most vulnerable people are prioritized, regardless of whether they are in level 1, 2 or 3.

But there was an element of a "zip code lottery". The addition of ten more vaccination hospitals across England – on top of the 50 originally announced – was tacit approval from the NHS that certain areas, such as the virus blackspots of Manchester, Bradford and Medway in Kent, were not receiving their fair share.

Lots of the vaccine will be distributed according to the size of the local population so everyone should have equal access to the doses available. However, regional vaccination rates inevitably vary as hospitals go through their patient lists at different speeds.

How many people have had their first dose so far?

There have been "tens of thousands" so far, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said on Thursday – but the exact number has not been disclosed.

ARE YOU CALLING SOMEONE TO GET THE JAB?

No. When it is your turn, the NHS will contact you by phone or in writing with an appointment, usually a few days later. It has been reported that people call their local hospital and get a sting the same day. This is highly recommended.

SHOULD YOU HAVE THE JAB IF YOU HAVE ALLERGIES?

Dr. June Raine, chief executive of the drug and health products regulator that approved the vaccine, said, “Anaphylaxis (a severe allergic reaction) is a known, if very rare, side effect of any vaccine.

“Most people will not get anaphylaxis, and the benefits of protecting people from Covid-19 outweigh the risks.

"Anyone scheduled to receive their vaccine should go back to their appointment and discuss any questions or medical history of serious allergies with their health care professionals before they get the sting."

Margaret Keenan, 90, is the first patient in the UK to receive the Pfizer / BioNtech vaccine covid-19 at University Hospital in Coventry

Margaret Keenan, 90, is the first patient in the UK to receive the Pfizer / BioNtech vaccine covid-19 at University Hospital in Coventry

What if you are sick on the day of the vaccination?

Do not attend the appointment, but call the NHS on the number given and arrange a new day.

WHAT HAPPENS ONCE IN THE CLINIC?

Similar to any vaccination, you will be asked questions about your health. A first dose of the Pfizer / BioNTech vaccine will then be injected into your upper arm. You will then have to wait 15 minutes before leaving the company so that staff can ensure that there are no adverse reactions.

DOES THE VACCINE PROVIDE PROTECTION JUST AFTER THE FIRST JAB?

No. Pfizer / BioNTech shock recipients begin building immunity 12 days after the first dose – but don't have full immunity until a week after the second dose – that is, 28 days after the first shock. You will most likely be given an appointment card with details of when to return 21 days later for your second booster dose, although paperwork procedures vary between areas. If you can't make the booster jab appointment, give me a call to rearrange it.

WHAT IF YOU REFUSE THE JAB – BUT YOU WILL CHANGE YOUR MIND?

You should call the team that offered you the original invite. You are welcome to make an appointment.

Can you pass the virus on to others even if you had the JAB?

That is a great unknown. Scientists are unsure whether the Pfizer vaccine elicits what is known as "sterilizing immunity" as studies have not tested this aspect. They just checked to see if it was preventing people from getting sick. Pfizer says that since the vaccine can protect against both severe and mild Covid illnesses well, it suggests that there is a chance to protect against infection as well. However, more test results are needed before we know for sure.

WHO WILL GET PRIORITY FOR JAB?

Only those in the first two groups of the priority list will get the sting this week. The focus is on people over 80 in the hospital or in their own four walls. In a week, the teams will also visit nursing homes in England.

1. Older adult care home residents (estimated 425,000) and their carers (up to 1.5 million)

2. Everyone aged 80 and over (3.3 million) and health and social workers on the front lines (1.5 million)

3. Everyone over 75 years of age (2.2 m)

4. Everyone over 70 years of age (3.3 m) and those who are considered to be clinically extremely vulnerable

5. All persons aged 65 and over (3.4 m)

6. Anyone between the ages of 16 and 64 with underlying health conditions that are at greater risk of serious illness and death

7. Everyone over 60 years of age (3.7 m)

8. Everyone over 55 years of age (4.3 m)

9. Everyone over 50 years of age (4.7 m)

THE VULNERABLE Vaccines are also offered to people aged 16 and over who have the following conditions: blood cancer; Diabetes; Heart problem; Chest discomfort or difficulty breathing; Kidney disease; Liver disease; decreased immunity due to illness or treatment; with organ transplant; have had a stroke or transient ischemic attack; a neurological or muscle debilitating condition; severe or profound learning disabilities; Down syndrom; Problem with spleen or spleen removal; seriously overweight; severe mental illness.

NOW JABS AT GP SURGERY

Over 280 GP surgeries throughout England will act as a vaccination center in the coming days and is expected to receive more than one million additional doses of Pfizer's vaccine from the Belgian factory. These, in addition to the 800,000 already in the country, will allow the NHS to increase the number of appointments in the run-up to Christmas. The vaccination staff will work on Christmas Day. However, it seems that while nursing home residents are high on the priority list, they have to wait for the mobile vaccination teams to be ready to make home visits. However, health bosses hope that vaccinations in nursing homes will begin in the last few days before the festive break. The logistics are more difficult than general practices because the vaccine bottles are fragile and need to be kept at minus 70 ° C (minus 94 ° F) or below and the NHS wants to go step by step.

Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland

While vaccination of those over 80 is "actively considered" in communities in Northern Ireland, according to the Stormont decentralized government, there are no immediate plans for primary care practices in Scotland, where the earliest introduction in the US is expected in New Years or Spring. The same is true in Wales.

Alok Sharma's Vaccination Army: How the Bomb Disposal Hero got the crack team to make Britain for the first time in the world after rejecting the EU's slower efforts

By Glen Owen Political Editor for the Sunday Post

The battle to defuse the biggest public health crisis in a century by launching a mass vaccination campaign was entrusted to a crack team of world-class experts led by an army bomb disposal expert.

Lt. Col. Nick Elliott, a former combat and bomb disposer in the First Gulf War, Balkans and Iraq, was given operational control of the Vaccine Taskforce in April.

The group, formed in Whitehall under the auspices of Secretary of Commerce Alok Sharma, was the brainchild of the government's Chief Scientific Adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, who concluded that the massive logistical challenge could not be met by the civil service.

Instead, an agile team was built from across the private sector, dedicated solely to the rapid procurement and introduction of the vaccine.

Economic Secretary Alok Sharma was introduced during a coronavirus media briefing on Downing Street in London on November 12th. The Vaccine Task Force was established in Whitehall under the auspices of Mr. Sharma

Lt. Col. Nick Elliott, a former combat and bomb disposal engineer, was given operational control of the Vaccine Task Force

Lt. Col. Nick Elliott (right), a former combat and bomb disposal engineer, was given operational control of the Vaccine Task Force, established in Whitehall under the auspices of Alok Sharma (left), in April

The pictures of 90-year-old Margaret Keenan from last week receiving the first Pfizer Covid vaccine were the triumphant result of the team's 24/7 work. Members of the unit were emailing at 3 a.m. holding Zoom meetings in their pajamas while trying to update offers on the latest vaccines.

The unit, chaired by Kate Bingham, began as a cell with just 20 employees – but soon grew into a team of more than 200 employees seconded by the military and industry, with experience ranging from the pharmaceutical sector to large infrastructure projects such as the Trident Submarine use.

The strong team included Madelaine McTernan, former CEO of Credit Suisse, Ruth Todd of the Department of Defense's Submarine Delivery Agency, and former British Ambassador Tim Colley.

The vaccine triumph is also a political success for Mr Sharma – one of the more humble and selfless government officials – who decided in July to reject the EU's vaccine initiative so the UK can do its own business.

The move sparked outrage among opposition parties. Lib Dem MP Layla Moran said moving away from the program would put "ideology before public health", while Labor Bell Ribeiro-Addy said the government would "put Brexit before saving lives".

However, Mr Sharma's decision has been confirmed: while the UK was the first country to grant regulatory approval for the vaccine, the EU drug regulator is not expected to approve Pfizer until late December, with launch across the continent not expected until January at the earliest .

If the UK had joined the EU system, the European Commission would have the exclusive right to negotiate with vaccine manufacturers on behalf of the UK, with no UK in making decisions about the companies to negotiate, the number of doses to buy and the price A say has to be paid or the delivery schedules – and with the approach that must be coordinated with all 27 EU member states.

Mr. Sharma was free to "bet on any horse in the race" by signing early contracts with various vendors and ordering 40 million cans from Pfizer on July 20.

No pain: Sister Marta Cravo gives Hunter Davies the Covid-19 vaccine on Saturday at the Royal Free Hospital. A team from across the private sector was put together to focus solely on the rapid procurement and introduction of the vaccine

No pain: Sister Marta Cravo gives Hunter Davies the Covid-19 vaccine on Saturday at the Royal Free Hospital. A team from across the private sector was put together to focus solely on the rapid procurement and introduction of the vaccine

Shortly thereafter, 100 million doses of the Oxford University / AstraZeneca Jab followed, which is expected to receive regulatory approval soon.

In six months, Lieut Col Elliott's team had amassed an impressive stash of 357 million doses from seven different vaccine developers – the highest per capita rate in the world.

British companies also helped manufacture three of the vaccines, with AstraZeneca, Valneva and Novavax operating from sites all the way to Wrexham and Stirling.

A source close to the project said: “Sir Patrick and Alok realized very early on that the public service was not up to the challenge.

& # 39; It had to be a nimble unit, led by a world-class logistics expert – Nick Elliott – and drawing on the best minds in the business. We also needed independence in order to cut our own businesses free from the interference of Brussels.

Imagine if it was a civil service team coordinating with the EU. We wouldn’t have gotten the bumps out in months. & # 39;

As Kay Burley was nailed by her own Sky News peers, "Resentful" junior producers hired photographers to host and then alerted the media

Posted by Katie Hind Show Business Editor for The Mail on Sunday

It was an opportunity to take revenge on an overpowering colleague who just turned out to be too good to ignore.

When a group of angry junior production workers on Sky News heard star host Kay Burley brag about plans for 60th birthday celebrations that would violate strict lockdown rules, they didn't hesitate to rush – and set a chain of events going When she was banned from the air for six months, her reputation was badly tarnished.

When the £ 600,000-a-year presenter embarked on an African safari vacation away from the UK spotlight yesterday, The Mail on Sunday may reveal the full story of how Burley was the ignorant architect of her own demise and how she got into what happened mugged was described as a "perfect inside job coup".

The conspiracy of colleagues – long annoyed with her bossy manner – began when they heard her speak on the tiles in advance about last weekend's night, which resulted in her and three other Sky News journalists in their house Knightsbridge, Central London, celebrated.

Sky News host Kay Burley has agreed not to be on the air for six months after breaking coronavirus rules. Pictured: Kay Burley hugs herself and Beth Rigby (center in red) at Mrs. Burley's 60th birthday party on Saturday

Sky News host Kay Burley has agreed not to be on the air for six months after breaking coronavirus rules. Pictured: Kay Burley hugs herself and Beth Rigby (center in red) at Mrs. Burley's 60th birthday party on Saturday

They secretly recruited a paparazzi photographer to take photos of Burley breaking the lockdown rules and created an encrypted email account to forward the story to the media.

Burley, who turns 60 on Thursday, has been the Queen of Sky News for years. She has been part of the team since the station first aired in 1989. She is extremely professional and is respected by her bosses. However, she has drawn envy from colleagues. Words like "divisive" and "inviolable" are used about them – as they are often about successful people.

And so, nine days ago at Sky's huge headquarters in Osterley, west London, Burley shared her excitement over her plans to celebrate her birthday, leaving colleagues in no doubt that she would dine with people from out of town at a venue her own Household.

She was overheard explaining that she would only be visiting the club for members of Century, a celebrity hangout near Piccadilly Circus, with a group of more than six people.

"It was a boom that could really bring them down," says a source. & # 39; They thought & # 39; If she gets caught, that would be the end for her. & # 39; & # 39;

Burley named certain people she'd invited, including Beth Rigby, Sky News political editor and Burley's best friend since joining the station from The Times in 2016.

ESCAPE: Kay Burley's 60th birthday violation was passed on to the media in an email from her own Sky TV colleagues. Pictured: Burley at Heathrow Airport on his way to an African safari on Friday when the embarrassed presenter flies into exile worth £ 600,000 a year

ESCAPE: Kay Burley's 60th birthday violation was passed on to the media in an email from her own Sky TV colleagues. Pictured: Burley at Heathrow Airport on his way to an African safari on Friday when the embarrassed presenter flies into exile worth £ 600,000 a year

The conspirators acted quickly. A little more than 24 hours later, photographers from the well-known paparazzi agency Eroteme were waiting in front of the club for Burley and her friends.

The group also included Sky's Northern England correspondent Inzamam Rashid and presenter Sam Washington. They spilled on the sidewalk in front of the discreet venue and avoided social distancing rules. Some prepared to go home while others discussed where to continue partying.

Burley, dressed in black from head to toe, and Rigby were even seen hugging. According to the latter, it was a goodbye hug, for which she later apologized.

While others were leaving the party, a smaller group reportedly went to the Soho restaurant, Folie (French for "madness," "stupidity" or "folly"), whose stylish owner Guillaume Depoix had appeared on Burley's Sky Show earlier this week .

A hardcore group of four, including Rashid and former Sky News Royal correspondent Paul Harrison, who now works for controversial Chinese electronics giant Huawei, is said to have hosted an after-after party at Burley.

By early Sunday morning, Burley's nemes had received the incriminating photos they needed.

They work with an account they created for the occasion at ProtonMail, which calls itself the world's largest secure email service.

The Switzerland-based company was founded by former researchers at CERN's large Hadron Collider and uses sophisticated encryption. This means that e-mails cannot be passed on to third parties and guarantees the sender anonymity behind the unencrypted e-mail addresses.

DAMN: The full verbatim email with minor grammatical errors sealed the fate of Burley, who broke the rules

DAMN: The full, verbatim email, with minor grammatical errors, that sealed Burley's fate

The conspirators emailed The Sun last Sunday – amusingly using kayburley@protonmail.com as the address – with details of the moderator's "crime" and attached the photos. However, the newspaper decided not to publish the story. The reason for this is not 100 percent clear.

The Sunday mail has since been given a copy of the email that said, "Kay Burley bragged about breaking level 2 lockdowns for her 60th birthday party last night."

It then went on to describe the evening's events, including how the party split into a table of six and four at Century to circumvent the rule of six, and how Depoix broke the law to allow the group to continue their celebrations at his restaurant.

The damn email concluded, “Four people then went back to Kay's Knightsbridge block. There are pictures. & # 39;

Distraught that The Sun hadn't taken the bait, the conspirators then gave the story to Westminster gossip website Guido Fawkes. The rest of the media duly followed, and the story became a front page news item on Wednesday.

Burley was quickly released from her duties and taken off the air for six months on full pay while her Sky bosses were forced to apologize.

Miss Burley (center, hugging someone) and Miss Rigby (in red) are pictured at the Century Club on Saturday after dinner

Miss Burley (center, hugging someone) and Miss Rigby (in red) are pictured at the Century Club on Saturday after dinner

Inzamam Rashid (center), Sam Washington (right) and former royal correspondent Paul Harrison (left) also attended

Inzamam Rashid (center), Sam Washington (right) and former royal correspondent Paul Harrison (left) also attended

Meanwhile, those behind the operation to bring it down are celebrating – albeit at a social distance from one another.

With Burley now in Africa, her friends are determined to find the Snitch. "There is a hunt for those who did this," assured a news source. “It was a facility that not only crashed Kay, but badly damaged the entire station.

"It was all an absolute embarrassment."

Last night, Tory MP Nickie Aiken, whose central London constituency includes both Soho and Knightsbridge, criticized the "incredibly selfish" actions of Burley and her colleagues as Covid rule breakers are blamed for rising infection rates in the capital the US could topple economically ruinous Tier 3 next week.

"Who do these people think they are?" Ms. Aiken told The Mail on Sunday. "These Sky presenters need to understand the consequences, and the consequences are people going out of business."

Sky News executives, including highly regarded content director Cristina Nicolotti Squires, were reportedly furious over the injury.

Meanwhile, editor Adam Boulton was public on his disdain for the behavior and tweeted criticism of Burley, including a comment calling her and other guests at the event "idiots".

I've been told that his views on Burley go back decades to the time they were both working on the ITV breakfast show, TV-am. Then he was Bigwig's political editor, and she was the up and coming reporter for girls.

A Sky source added: & # 39; The network had a great year – viewership has been good and the team has been commended for treating coronavirus so well.

& # 39; Now that's happening. It's completely unfair to the rest of the staff.

“They're also angry that she has six months off on full pay. What kind of message does it send? & # 39;

Fewer are more angry than Ms. Nicolotti Squires, a former executive of rival news organization ITN, where she edited Channel 5 News. She is said to have a "strained relationship" with Burley.

Others, however, are big fans. Burley is an extraordinary networker whose close friends include media manager Rebekah Brooks and broadcasters Piers Morgan and Susanna Reid. She is also friends with Frank Lampard and his TV host Christine, who has known the Chelsea manager since he was a teenager. Burley was married to Lampard's agent Steve Kutner and the couple have a son.

Although her on-screen role is strict, Burley is privately involved in society. It's no surprise that her guests hated calling it a night as the first part of her birthday party ended.

I became part of Burley's gang for a while after meeting them at various events.

As a member of this circle, I remember being overwhelmed with loving compliments and regularly being invited to attend their evenings with a group of about ten people.

Paul Harrison was usually there, as was some great co-stars she met on Channel 4's Celebrity Hunted that Burley would freely flirt with. We would start at the Archer Street Cocktail Bar in Soho, where Burley was guaranteed to be the best table, and we would end around the corner at the gay bar Freedom. There she was connected well enough to make sure we had the best seat and plenty of alcohol. Either she paid for it or it was given for free – I certainly didn't see a bill at the end of the night.

FRIENDS: Burley, right, with Sky Political Editor Beth Rigby, left, Burley's best friend since joining The Times in 2016

FRIENDS: Burley, right, with Sky Political Editor Beth Rigby, left, Burley's best friend since joining The Times in 2016

What now for Burley?

Following an internal investigation on Thursday, Sky News said the bosses expect all team members to fully comply with Covid restrictions. Everyone involved regrets the incident and apologized.

They added, “After our review of events on December 5th, we agreed with Beth Rigby and Inzamam Rashid that they would not be on the air for three months and we agreed with Kay Burley that she would not be on the air for six months . & # 39;

Minutes later, Burley confirmed that she would "step down from my broadcasting role for a period of reflection."

She added: “It doesn't matter that I thought I was Covid compliant. The fact is, I was wrong, made a big mistake and I'm sorry. Some dear friends and colleagues – some of the most talented and dedicated professionals in our business – have been drawn into this episode and I deeply regret this.

& # 39; I was one of the founding presenters of Sky News. Nobody is more proud of our station's reputation, the professionals on our team and the impact we make. I am very much looking forward to continuing my 32 year career at Sky upon my return. & # 39;

According to some at the train station, however, this may not be in the form she is used to. A source believes that if she returns in the spring, it is “unlikely” that she will get her breakfast show, which she started last October.

Some, who air on both Sky One and Sky News, believe the reviews were very bad.

"It's a sense of relief and the bosses now have the option to put the show off and move it to another place," they added.

Others simply believe that if their authority has been undermined, she will never return.

As one colleague remarked, "How can hypocrites like you or Beth Rigby ever hold a person in power to be held accountable again without being ridiculed?"

(tagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) Nachrichten (t) Boris Johnson (t) NHS (t) Coronavirus Lockdowns (t) Christmas