ENTERTAINMENT

Newspaper columnist Donnachadh McCarthy supports the XR blockade of the free press


A newspaper columnist who worked for the BBC was exposed as one of the activists behind the Extinction Rebellion's blockade of a print shop on Friday.

The blockade prevented the circulation of several national newspapers and left hundreds of Britons without their papers on Saturday morning.

Now Donnachadh McCarthy, a columnist for the Independent, has been exposed as one of around 100 XR activists who took part in the protest at a print shop in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire.

In addition to writing regularly for a national newspaper, McCarthy makes frequent appearances on radio and television, including BBC's It's Not Easy Being Green and ITV's How Green is Your House ?.

On Saturday at 9:30 am, he tweeted a photo of the Broxbourne blockade and said: & # 39; Dawn at #ExtinctionRebellion blockade of Murdoch's printing works. 9 hours and loads of rebels are still locked up. Murdoch + media billionaires need to tell the truth about climate and environmental crises. & # 39;

McCarthy, a corporate environmental auditor and author of The Prostitute State – How British Democracy Was Bought, has also written for The Sunday Times, The Guardian, and Esquire.

Donnachadh McCarthy, a columnist for the Independent, was exposed as one of around 100 XR activists who took part in the protest

Extinction Rebellion protesters are blocking access to a print shop in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, and leaving the shelves of some newsagents empty on Saturday morning

Extinction Rebellion protesters are blocking access to a print shop in Broxbourne, Hertfordshire, and leaving the shelves of some newsagents empty on Saturday morning

Last week he appeared at an XR protest near the Houses of Parliament, speaking to a group of activists.

He has also participated in several road closures in central London.

In his role as environmental editor, McCarthy advises companies and organizations on improving their environmental practices through his London-based consulting firm 3 Acorns Eco-Audits.

Gully Bujak, a dedicated Extinction Rebellion activist who works as an actress and model, also participated in the blockade.

On Friday evening she said in front of the printer: “The climate emergency is an existential threat to humanity. Instead of getting this front-page coverage every day as it deserves, a lot of our media outlets are ignoring the issue and some are actively sowing the seeds of climate denial. & # 39;

The 27-year-old's previous combat awards include being arrested at a protest last April after sitting in a pink boat blocking the center of Oxford Circus. On the occasion, she said the police were "courteous and considerate" but that this was only due to their "privileged position as a middle-class white woman."

Jonathan Fuller, a former HMRC and Transport London official, also attended the blockade.

Gully Bujak, a dedicated Extinction Rebellion activist who works as an actress and model, also participated in the blockade

Gully Bujak, a dedicated Extinction Rebellion activist who works as an actress and model, also participated in the blockade

Jonathan Fuller, a former HMRC and Transport London official, also attended the blockade

Jonathan Fuller, a former HMRC and Transport London official, also attended the blockade

Alanna Byrne, Extinction Rebellion's media coordinator, justified the suspension of national newspapers on Saturday and also attended

Alanna Byrne, Extinction Rebellion's media coordinator, justified the suspension of national newspapers on Saturday and also attended

Mr Fuller, 62 and now a full-time environmental activist, previously made headlines after he was arrested during the Oxford Circus blockade last April when he went viral.

In the clip, he praised the police for the kindness, concern and professionalism shown to him during his arrest and detention.

The 62-year-old previously fought against the expansion of Southend Airport and proposals for an airport in the Thames Estuary.

He said on Saturday, “There is a lot that the radio and print media don't cover – especially the right wing press – which is why we're here today.

In September 2018, the United Nations Secretary-General stated that climate change was an existential threat, but one that was not widely reported. The same thing happened in February 2020 when the [US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration] predicted that the first ice-free summer would be 2024.

& # 39; The cruelty is special to the youth. The media denied them the information in order to protect themselves and prevent what could ultimately kill them. & # 39;

Matthew Hammond, 51, a math teacher and tutor from Exeter, also attended, revealing that this was only his third protest

He said: “Of course I am not a willing rebel. But a lot of it is about Murdoch and the press. That information is out there but it's not covered.

"Murdoch has destroyed personal debates on many things, including climate change and Brexit, and it's just become a slag match."

Alanna Byrne, Extinction Rebellion's media coordinator, justified the suspension of national newspapers on Saturday and also attended.

She said, "If we are to clean up this mess, the mainstream media must stop capitalizing on the clickbait culture that is swimming in misinformation that leads us to hate our neighbors, suspect foreigners and vulnerable groups, and the nation." to move action. & # 39;

Byrne holds degrees in English literature and art history from Roehampton University.

She previously worked as a project manager and communications coordinator for the charity for stammering children.

She also worked for a production company in Los Angeles for a year before joining Project Cordillera, a company that organizes sustainable adventure vacations in South America.

Extinction Rebellion activists hold a banner warning of & # 39; Marine Extinction & # 39; as they lead a procession over Westminster Bridge in central London this afternoon

Extinction Rebellion activists hold a banner warning of & # 39; Marine Extinction & # 39; as they lead a procession over Westminster Bridge in central London this afternoon

Protesters cross Westminster Bridge during a march for the extinction of the seas, which is part of the protests in central London this weekend. Extinction Rebellion is continuing its plans to hold demonstrations in central London for 10 days as part of its ongoing campaign on climate change

Protesters cross Westminster Bridge during a march for the extinction of the seas, which is part of the protests in central London this weekend. Extinction Rebellion is continuing its plans to hold demonstrations in central London for 10 days as part of its ongoing campaign on climate change

Extinction Rebellion protesters marched across the bridge and through Westminster

Extinction Rebellion protesters marched across the bridge and through Westminster

At the Marine Extinction March, activists carried props, flags and banners from the Dead Sea to highlight what XR called the destruction of the world's oceans in their recent demonstration

At the Marine Extinction March, activists carried props, flags and banners from the Dead Sea to highlight what XR called the destruction of the world's oceans in their recent demonstration

The procession was led by a group of dancers wearing blue robes to represent the sea

The procession was led by a group of dancers wearing blue robes to represent the sea

It comes as Extinction Rebellion protesters held their final demonstration on Westminster Bridge in London this afternoon.

Protesters clad in blue robes crossed the bridge during a march of the extinction of the navy, part of a protest against the extinction of the rebellion in central London.

The environmental activists are still planning 10 days of demonstrations in central London as part of their ongoing climate change awareness campaign.

At the Marine Extinction March, activists carried props, flags and banners from the Dead Sea to highlight the destruction of the world's oceans by XR.

The procession was led by a group of dancers wearing blue robes to represent the sea and a man wearing only swimwear, a yellow hat, and sneakers.

The previous Sunday, around 100 protesters met at Gabriel & # 39; s Wharf to raise awareness about the effects of climate change and how it could lead to more extreme weather conditions and flooding.

Jan O & # 39; Malley, 74, from Clapham, South West London, took part in the march in Parliament Square.

She said, “I am attending because I have grandchildren and they are about to have their own children, and I am very concerned about the implications for our future generations.

"The government has declared a climate emergency, but it is not taking action quickly enough."