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New Hope UK May Avoid Another National Lockdown As Study Shows R-Rate Is FALLING


Boris Johnson's call to the nation to continue fighting the coronavirus was underpinned by new figures showing that infection rates slowed after restrictions were tightened.

The results of the largest Covid-19 study in England showed that the R-rate fell from 1.7 to around 1.1.

The director of the study at Imperial College London and Ipsos Mori said the interim results of 80,000 participants "heightened the need for protective measures" to eradicate the virus.

That restrictions appear to help contain the spread of Covid-19 will help the Prime Minister impose curbs in the event of flare-ups.

At a press conference on Downing Street last night, Mr Johnson, flanked by Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance, vowed not to throw in the sponge and surrender to demands to give up his strategy.

Critics have argued that recent measures, including local lockdowns and national restrictions like curfew on pubs at 10 p.m., are ineffective while devastating the economy and violating civil liberties.

The study commissioned by the Ministry of Health found that the volunteers were tested between September 18-26, one in 200 people had coronavirus.

Professor Paul Elliott, Director of the School of Public Health Program at Imperial, said, “While our latest findings show some early evidence that the growth of new cases has slowed, suggesting that efforts to control the infection are working, is the prevalence of The infection is the highest that we have recorded so far.

"This reinforces the need for protective measures to limit the spread of the disease and public compliance with these measures. This will be vital in minimizing other significant diseases and deaths from Covid-19."

In other developments:

  • The UK recorded 7,108 more coronavirus cases and an additional 71 deaths yesterday – including a three-month high of seven in Scotland;
  • Bank of England chief economist Andy Haldane called for optimism about the country's prospects, warning that a "chicken lick" stance could hurt the recovery.
  • Economy Minister Alok Sharma faced a backlash after blaming "gotcha" questions for the prime minister's confusion over lockdown rules for the northeast.
  • Ministers fear that the public will show increasing signs of "lockdown fatigue" as the pandemic drags on and rules become more complicated.

The Prime Minister showed the latest slides on the status of the coronavirus at press conference # 10 tonight

Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, and Patrick Vallance, Chief Science Officer, attended the Cabinet meeting in Whitehall today

Chris Whitty, Chief Medical Officer, and Patrick Vallance, Chief Science Officer, attended the Cabinet meeting in Whitehall today

The Imperial College study examines the level of infection in the general population by testing more than 150,000 participants each month for a period of two weeks.

Interim results from the study's fourth report, released Thursday, show that around 55 people per 10,000 tested positive, up from 13 people per 10,000 in the previous study between August 24 and September 7.

This means that 411,000 people in England have the virus, which means that more than one in 200 people was infected at the same time.

The results also show that the prevalence of infection was highest among 18- to 24-year-olds – with one in 100 infected – while the cases among those aged 65 and over went from 0.04 percent to 0, compared to the last report. 29 percent increased sevenfold.

The north-west of England, where areas such as Burnley and Liverpool were subject to local restrictions, had the highest infection rates, while the number of infections in London quintupled from 0.10 percent to 0.49 percent.

The final report and results of all 150,000 volunteers tested between September 18 and October 5 will be released next week.

Half of the volunteers who tested positive had no symptoms at the time of the test or the week before, but it was found that this did not mean they did not develop symptoms later.

The study also found that people of Asian and black ethnicity were twice as likely to suffer from the virus as whites.

Mr Johnson insisted yesterday that the country knows how to fight the virus because "we've done it before". And as a warning that Britain had reached a “critical moment”, he vowed not to “throw the sponge in” and promised to take tougher measures if necessary.

In a defiant message to the Tory Hawks desperate to reopen the economy faster, the Prime Minister insisted that the risk of the virus "running its course" in a Swedish approach would overwhelm the NHS and thousands causing further deaths. He also warned it was too early to judge if curfew was working after 6am and 10pm.

Top experts have repeatedly warned that the UK must learn to live with Covid-19 because it will be with us for generations. Companies fear that tougher measures – similar to the first draconian lockdown – would cripple the economy even further.

Mr Johnson, along with his chief medical officer and scientific advisor, turned to the nation despite a severe pressure drop due to such complaints, being used as "propaganda" in support of increasingly draconian restrictions.

The trio presented maps that made the divide between north and south coronaviruses clear. Official data shows that the average number of positive tests per day in North West England is at least twice that of any other region and that Scotland's cases are 14 times higher than in early August, beating the outbreak in England.

An average of 1,595 cases of Covid-19 are currently diagnosed daily in the Northwest, compared to just 150 in the Southwest, while Yorkshire, Humber and Northeast have the second highest infection rates. All 10 areas with the worst per capita ratios are in the north, while eight out of ten areas with the lowest are in the south. Professor Whitty said there is a "strong concentration" of coronavirus towards the top of England.

In an appeal to the public, the Prime Minister said: "If we work together now, we will give ourselves the best possible chance to avoid this result and avoid further action."

“I know some people will think we should give up and let the virus run its course, despite the enormous death that it could potentially cause. I have to say that I deeply disagree. I don't think the British people want that. I don't think they want to throw the sponge in. They want to fight and defeat this virus and we will. & # 39;

“Even as we fight Covid, it's important that people get the treatment they need for other diseases. But I have to be clear if the NHS were overwhelmed by Covid then no one could get such care. & # 39;

Sir Patrick highlighted the surge in infections and defended his recent comments warning that there could be 50,000 coronavirus cases a day in the UK by mid-October. He said grimly, "Things are definitely going in the wrong direction."

Professor Whitty hit back critics, saying they accused him of being "too optimistic and too pessimistic about numbers". But he said that in March the government failed to realize how quickly the virus was spreading and the bug could not be repeated. In somber news he said: "We have a long winter ahead of us."

Previously, Mr Johnson finally bowed to calls for MPs to vote before new lockdown restrictions – after angry spokesman Lindsay Hoyle beat him up for treating the Commons with "contempt".

The data presented by Professor Whitty in the televised briefing showed a clear north-south divide between coronavirus infections across England.

The scientific advisors admitted that the upper half of the country is significantly more affected than the lower half, but insisted that the problem is not nationwide.

A heat map of infection rates across the country showed that almost all of the Southwest, Southeast, East Midlands and East of England were shaded in the lightest possible color, meaning the number of cases is below the England average.

WHY IS THE OUTBREAK NOW CENTERED IN THE NORTH?

Gloomy government statistics were released at press conference # 10 tonight and are skyrocketing in the north and Scotland.

However, the two best scientific advisors to Boris Johnson or Downing St, Sir Patrick Vallance and Professor Chris Whitty, could not provide an explanation.

Top scientists have speculated that if immunity to the UK's first wave is lower in the spring, it could be up north.

For example, government advisors estimate that around 17 percent of people living in the capital have developed Covid-19 antibodies – suggesting they already had and defeated the virus. However, the rate is believed to be below 10 percent for the rest of the UK.

Scientists warned that the virus would have thrived in London before the March 23 lockdown, given that the city is so densely populated with 9 million residents and packed buses and tubes. Thousands of tourists – who could possibly have carried the disease – were also allowed to fly in and enjoy the capital's attractions without being checked.

One expert has not downplayed the theory that the north may now be hit by the second wave because of its cloudy weather. Several studies have examined the possible link between weather and Covid-19 outbreaks but have yet to reach a clear consensus.

The average temperature in Manchester is 16 ° C in August but drops below 13 ° C in September – the two months when the falls began to turn in the northwest. It's even colder in Scotland.

For reference, London is only slightly warmer than Manchester. The average temperature of the capital is around 19 ° C in August and 17 ° C in September.

Dr. John McCauley, one of the world's foremost influenza scientists, told MailOnline that when it rains and cold, people are pushed inside. But he admitted that it would be very "difficult" to consolidate the bond.

Dr. McCauley of London's Francis Crick Institute pointed to flu outbreaks in Ireland and Poland, where the climates are "very different" but the seasonality of the virus is "fairly similar".

In the Polish winter, temperatures regularly drop below freezing and people have to stay indoors. Ireland is frequently hit by strong winds and rain.

Cold and flu viruses are known to thrive indoors, and experts say the coronavirus, which spreads through coughing, sneezing, and breathing, will be no exception to the trend.

Respiratory viruses also prefer winter because people spend more time together indoors, where they are forced to be in closer contact than they would in the park in summer. The closer people are to each other, the more likely it is that they will spread the virus between them.

Dr. McCauley also told MailOnline that the outbreak in the north could simply be due to bad luck.

However, Professor Anthony Brookes, an expert in genomics at the University of Leicester, said the researchers were having "difficulty" understanding what was really going on due to a lack of data on tests for the various regions.

“They are published for the whole country, but per region and day – that is missing. This makes it difficult to analyze what is going on in different regions at different times. We only have the number of positive cases identified.

& # 39; However, given the limitation of not doing the number of tests per day per region, this can be estimated.

“And that suggests that there really isn't a second wave in London. However, the opposite is the case in the north. & # 39;

The average infection rate for the entire country was 35.7 cases per 100,000, as in the last official update from Public Health England last Friday.

The color coding showed that the problem is worst in the northwest around Liverpool and Manchester and in the far northeast towards Newcastle.

Much of these two regions and the West Midlands – and to a lesser extent London and Cornwall – have been shown in a darker color, indicating that the fall rates are near or above average.

Professor Whitty said: “At this point there is a very high concentration in certain areas – particularly the North West, the North East and parts of the Midlands …

“There has been a general increase (in the rate of infection) across England, and so has Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. However, there has been a very rapid increase in certain areas. again, particularly in the Northeast, Northwest, and Midlands areas (but not exclusively). & # 39;

The number of positive tests reported by the Ministry of Health reflects the information on the card. The northwest reports significantly more cases than any other region.

In the week leading up to September 23 – the latest available data – an average of 1,595 cases per day were diagnosed in the crisis region.

This was more than double the daily average of 663 in Yorkshire and Humber, three times that of 564 in the West Midlands and 551 in the Northeast.

It blows the southern regions except London (471 per day) out of the water.

In the East Midlands there were 274 cases per day over the same seven day period, 227 in the South East, 185 in the East of England and only 150 in the South West.

This means that the looming threat of a national lockdown, which Mr Johnson said today he did not want to resort to, but if he had to, would put millions of people at risk of severe restrictions due to the actions of hundreds of miles away.

MEPs have already warned against a "broad brush tactic" in which people in less affected areas are wrongly punished.

But Sir Patrick Vallance insisted at today's conference: “It would be wrong to conclude that this is a problem that only occurs in certain areas.

"It's worse in certain areas, but there are signs of spread everywhere and we need to be aware of this and everyone must take precautions across the country."

The images presented at the briefing reflect data from Public Health England.

Of the 48 areas in the intervention category on the PHE watchlist, none are further south than the Midlands.

Birmingham and nearby Sandwell as well as Leicester and Oadby and Wigston are the southernmost areas where local lockdown measures have been taken.

Eight out of ten areas with the lowest infection rate per 100,000 people are in the south of England – Isle of Wight, Somerset, East Sussex, Dorset, Devon, Wokingham, Swindon and Torbay. Suffolk in the east and Herefordshire in the West Midlands complete the list.

All 10 areas with the highest infection rates are in the north – Bolton, South Tyneside, Blackburn with Darwen, Knowsley, Halton, Liverpool, Bury, Newcastle, Manchester and Oldham.

However, frustration is growing with local lockdowns in these areas, and MailOnline believes Cabinet Hawks are increasingly frustrated with dire warnings from medical and scientific leaders of a second wave.

Former Downing Street aides urged the government to put the experts out of the spotlight, warning they weren't great communicators.

FALLS INCREASE FASTER IN SCOTLAND THAN ENGLAND, DATA SHOWS

Official test data shows that the number of cases in Scotland is increasing significantly faster than in England.

Although there are fewer infections north of the border, the daily average number of cases is now almost 14 times higher than it was in early August, while the number of cases in England has increased fivefold by comparison.

The numbers suggest that the outbreak is accelerating three times as fast in Scotland as it is in England.

During the first week of August, an average of 38 cases per day were diagnosed in Scotland. That moving average has risen 1,252 percent since yesterday to reach 514.

In England, the average of 807 cases per day in the first week of August through September 28 has risen by comparatively less than 445 percent.

Today's and yesterday's data cannot be used for comparison as the numbers are low as not all positive tests for the day are recorded.

And Scotland's cases rose to an all-time high of 806 on September 29, from a low of just two positive cases on July 7.

In the meantime, England hit an upper limit of 7,143 yesterday, September 29, after a low of 398 on July 14.

The increase in England was around 1,700 percent – around 17 times higher – while that in Scotland boomed more than 400 times.

The surge will be especially worrying and disappointing for the nation, which is closer to eradication than any other part of the UK, with a month-long period between July 17 and 18 without a single death.

Senior Conservative Sir Bernard Jenkin upped the ante today by pointing out that the government is using "science as propaganda".

Prof. Whitty told the Downing Street briefing that test positivity had "increased significantly" in the northeast and northwest of England, as well as in Yorkshire and the Humber.

"This increase is accelerating quite quickly in some of these areas," he said.

He said the rates among school-age children "really don't change very much".

However, he said hospitalization is increasing, particularly at hotspots, although the numbers remain "at much lower levels than in early April".

Professor Whitty added, "We caution that the direction of travel is in the wrong direction for both hospitals and intensive care units, especially in those areas where cases have been increasing rapidly."

Sir Patrick said, “It is very clear that prices are still going up. And so we don't have it under control at the moment.

"And the bumps Chris (Whitty) described in some areas are worrying and … will create more problems."

Mr Johnson said the way the virus is spreading may now be different than it was in March.

"We're seeing some very clear local peaks," he said.

"It may be that this time around it is a more localized phenomenon. In this case it is all the more reason for us to focus on both these local and these national solutions."

Professor Whitty said although the virus didn't double as quickly as it did in March, the numbers could pick up again quickly.

"Now, that low number of deaths shouldn't reassure us that we won't be in pretty difficult places in a relatively short time, certainly in the regions where we are currently seeing significant growth."

The north-south divide was highlighted after Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham warned that the coronavirus in the north of England could be worse than Margaret Thatcher.

Mr Burnham said local restrictions to combat the spread of the virus could "massively widen" the north-south divide in England and called for more support for businesses in Bolton, which has the toughest lockdown measures in the region.

Bolton Council Conservative Chairman David Greenhalgh also said he was calling on the government to recognize inequality between counties, claiming the city's hotel operations were "at the mercy of the lions".

Speaking at a weekly coronavirus press conference, Burnham said, “If we go into winter with the north under local restrictions, millions of people under restrictions, companies suffering from these restrictions, no support for these companies, we will see the north widening -South Divide.

WHITTY SAYS school cases don't get out of hand

Coronavirus cases don't get out of hand in schools, stressed Professor Chris Whitty tonight.

The UK Chief Medical Officer said prices for school-age children – under 16 – are not going up. At today's press conference number 10, he claimed the trend was true "across the country".

However, he cautioned that this would not be the case in 17-21 year olds, where outbreaks were increasing "fairly quickly".

The numbers come after unions and academics warned the return of schools would cause an explosion in cases that, while children do not appear to get Covid-19, could endanger the health of staff and parents.

Professor Whitty justified his claims about schools in a clear graph and presented official data on test positivity rates for five different age groups.

Test positive shows how many people believe they actually have Covid-19 and is a measure that can be used to track infections without the impact of the total number of cases, which can vary unreliably as more or fewer tests are done.

Professor Whitty's data, which he pointed out, showed that test positivity rates in 19–21 year olds rose to around 12.9 percent, and doubled from 6 percent at the beginning of the month. But he couldn't explain why.

The data unveiled at today's press conference, on which Boris Johnson warned of a second lockdown if the outbreak doesn't subside, also showed the positivity rate of the tests in 17- and 18-year-olds rose to around 9.6 percent .

For comparison: In the first two weeks of September it had remained relatively stable at under 7.5 percent.

Among the five to ten year olds (1.5 percent), the 11 to 14 year olds (2.2 percent) and the 15 and 16 year olds (3.8 percent), however, the rates have hardly changed.

“If you look back in the years to come, you will think that Covid-19 did more damage to the north of England than Margaret Thatcher and whatever she did in the 1980s.

“This is a real danger staring us straight in the face.

“A government that says it wants to rise cannot restrict the north of England without support. It's that simple. & # 39;

He said he believes Bolton, where restaurants and pubs are only allowed to offer take-away food and drink, has been "forgotten" by national politicians.

He added, “There are many places these days with a higher fall rate than Bolton, but their hospitality remains open and it is this lack of consistency that I believe causes people to lose confidence in what is going on .

“The feeling of injustice at Bolton is very, very real today.

“I would say it's easy – either the government will close hospitality in areas with higher case rates, with full compensation paid, by the way.

“If they're not ready, they should have Bolton opened. It has to be one or the other. & # 39;

Mr Greenhalgh told BBC News that the restrictions imposed earlier this month were "breeding resentments" among residents.

He said, "I still think there is an element of government because the restrictions are so complex that they fail to understand the huge differences across the country."

Earlier, Health Secretary Matt Hancock had announced the concessions in the House of Representatives, stating that the government would consult Parliament on any restrictions across England or the UK and that a vote would take place "wherever possible" in advance.

"Today I can confirm to the House that we will be consulting Parliament on important national measures with effect across England or the UK – wherever possible we will vote before such rules come into force," he said.

"But, of course, responding to the virus means the government must act quickly when necessary and we cannot meet the urgent regulations necessary to fight the virus and save lives."

Sir Graham Brady, who led the Tory Revolt, hailed the rise – which followed weeks of tension with the back benches.

The move came after Sir Lindsay issued an extraordinary reprimand complaining about the misuse of ministers' extensive powers to deal with the public health crisis.

Sir Lindsay read the riot to the Prime Minister as he sat in silence in the Chamber, making it clear that he was willing to join dozens of Tory rebels and opposition parties to ensure more control – and warned that the government was acting now must in order to restore "confidence".

DATA CONFIRM NORTH-SOUTH DIVISION IN ENGLAND

The data presented by Professor Whitty in the televised briefing showed a clear north-south divide between coronavirus infections across England.

The falls are increasing significantly faster and to a higher level in the northwest and northeast of the country, while the southwest and southeast remain almost untouched.

The scientific advisors admitted that the upper half of the country is significantly more affected than the lower half, but insisted that the problem is not nationwide.

A heat map of infection rates across the country showed that almost all of the Southwest, Southeast, East Midlands and East of England were shaded in the lightest possible color, meaning the number of cases is below the England average.

The average infection rate for the entire country was 35.7 cases per 100,000, as in the last official update from Public Health England last Friday.

The color coding showed that the problem is worst in the northwest around Liverpool and Manchester and in the far northeast towards Newcastle.

Much of these two regions and the West Midlands – and to a lesser extent London and Cornwall – have been shown in a darker color, indicating that the fall rates are near or above average.

Professor Whitty said: “At this point there is a very high concentration in certain areas – particularly the North West, the North East and parts of the Midlands …

“There has been a general increase (in the rate of infection) across England, and so has Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. However, there has been a very rapid increase in certain areas. again, especially in the Northeast, Northwest, and Midlands areas (but not exclusively). & # 39;

The number of positive tests reported by the Ministry of Health will reflect the information on the card. The northwest reports significantly more cases than any other region.

In the week leading up to September 23 – the latest available data – an average of 1,595 cases per day were diagnosed in the crisis region.

This was more than double the daily average of 663 in Yorkshire and Humber, three times that of 564 in the West Midlands and 551 in the Northeast.

It blows the southern regions except London (471 per day) out of the water.

In the East Midlands there were 274 cases per day over the same seven day period, 227 in the South East, 185 in the East of England and only 150 in the South West.

This means that the looming threat of a national lockdown, which Mr Johnson said today he did not want to resort to, but if he had to, would put millions of people at risk of severe restrictions due to the actions of hundreds of miles away.

MEPs have already warned against a "broad brush tactic" in which people in less affected areas are wrongly punished.

Aber Sir Patrick Vallance bestand auf der heutigen Konferenz darauf: „Es wäre falsch, daraus zu schließen, dass dies ein Problem ist, das nur in bestimmten Bereichen auftritt.

"In bestimmten Gebieten ist es schlimmer, aber es gibt überall Anzeichen für eine Ausbreitung, und wir müssen uns dessen bewusst sein, und jeder muss im ganzen Land Vorsichtsmaßnahmen treffen."

Die auf dem Briefing präsentierten Bilder spiegeln die Daten von Public Health England wider.

Von den 48 Gebieten in der Kategorie „Intervention“ auf der PHE-Beobachtungsliste liegt keines weiter südlich als die Midlands.

Birmingham und das nahe gelegene Sandwell sowie Leicester und Oadby und Wigston sind die am weitesten südlich gelegenen Gebiete, in denen lokale Sperrmaßnahmen ergriffen wurden.

Acht von zehn Gebieten mit der niedrigsten Infektionsrate pro 100.000 Einwohner befinden sich im Süden Englands – Isle of Wight, Somerset, East Sussex, Dorset, Devon, Wokingham, Swindon und Torbay. Suffolk im Osten und Herefordshire in den West Midlands vervollständigen die Liste.

Alle 10 Gebiete mit den höchsten Infektionsraten liegen im Norden – Bolton, South Tyneside, Blackburn mit Darwen, Knowsley, Halton, Liverpool, Bury, Newcastle, Manchester und Oldham.

"Die Regierung muss größere Anstrengungen unternehmen, um Maßnahmen schneller vorzubereiten, damit dieses Haus zum frühestmöglichen Zeitpunkt über die wichtigsten Maßnahmen debattieren und entscheiden kann", sagte er.

"Ich erwarte jetzt von der Regierung, dass sie das Vertrauen in dieses Haus wieder aufbaut und es nicht mit der Verachtung behandelt, die es gezeigt hat."

Der Sprecher lehnte einen von Tory-Rebellen eingereichten Änderungsantrag zu einem Antrag zur Erneuerung der Befugnisse des Coronavirus-Gesetzes ab, der vor Einführung neuer Maßnahmen zu erzwungenen Abstimmungen geführt hätte – er würde gegen das parlamentarische Verfahren verstoßen. Die Intervention reichte jedoch aus, um einen sofortigen Wechsel von der Regierung auszulösen.

Bei einem außergewöhnlichen Angriff im Unterhaus, dem Herr Johnson zuhören musste, schlug Sir Lindsay die Art und Weise zu, wie die Regierung durch Beschränkungen fuhr.

"Die Art und Weise, wie die Regierung während dieser Krise ihre Befugnisse zur Erteilung von Sekundärgesetzen ausgeübt hat, war völlig unbefriedigend", sagte er.

„Allzu oft wurden wichtige Rechtsinstrumente wenige Stunden vor ihrem Inkrafttreten veröffentlicht, und einige Erklärungen, warum wichtige Maßnahmen in Kraft getreten sind, bevor sie vor diesem Haus festgelegt werden können, waren nicht überzeugend und zeigen eine völlige Missachtung des Hauses .

"Die Regierung muss größere Anstrengungen unternehmen, um Maßnahmen schneller vorzubereiten, damit dieses Haus zum frühestmöglichen Zeitpunkt über die wichtigsten Maßnahmen debattieren und entscheiden kann."

Er fügte hinzu: "Ich erwarte jetzt von der Regierung, dass sie das Vertrauen in dieses Haus wieder aufbaut und es nicht mit der Verachtung behandelt, die es gezeigt hat."

Herr Johnson bezog sich nicht auf die stechende Kritik des Sprechers, als er danach für PMQs auf die Beine kam.

Die Unruhe unter den Abgeordneten über den Einfluss von Prof. Whitty und Sir Patrick auf den Ansatz der Regierung hat zugenommen.

Ein Kabinettsfalke sagte gegenüber MailOnline, dass Herr Johnson keine andere Wahl habe, als angesichts der schrecklichen Warnungen, die er erhielt, zu handeln. "Sie können verstehen, warum der Premierminister vorsichtig sein muss, wenn ihm gesagt wird, dass Zehntausende Menschen sterben werden", sagten sie.

Der Minister fügte hinzu, dass die Regierung jetzt von Experten "umfassender" beraten werde. "Die Falken im Kabinett sind mit der Meinungsbildung viel zufriedener als sie", sagten sie.

Die Quelle wies darauf hin, dass die Meinungen unter Wissenschaftlern sehr unterschiedlich seien und die Minister zuversichtlich sein müssten, eine Meinung zu vertreten. „Zu Beginn der Krise waren wir viel mehr von den Wissenschaftlern begeistert. Aber es gibt einen großen Unterschied zwischen einer Verdoppelung alle sieben Tage und alle 20 Tage “, sagten sie.

„Wir sprechen breiter mit Menschen mit unterschiedlichen Ansichten. Es könnte sein, dass Leute wie Carl Heneghan die richtige Einschätzung haben. & # 39;

'Die Modellierung ist überhaupt nicht genau. Es gibt Ihnen nur eine allgemeine Vorstellung davon, was passieren könnte. & # 39;

The PM gathered his Cabinet this morning after embarrassingly getting muddled about the draconian rules imposed on households mixing in the North East.

The mistake sparked a rare apology from Mr Johnson, who admitted that he had "spoken incorrectly" by suggesting that different households in groups of six could legally connect indoors.

Tory MPs insisted that there is no hope for ordinary members of the public if Mr Johnson cannot "keep up" with government changes.

But Business Secretary Alok Sharma swatted away the criticism this morning, accusing journalists of 'gotcha' questions and turning the situation into a 'quiz show' – saying people should check council websites rather than listening to the PM.

& # 39; With regard to this question, there is a slight & # 39; Gotcha & # 39; element. They're a flagship when it comes to serious news and it's not a quiz show, ”he told BBC Radio 4's Today program.

When asked if he thought that asking ministers to explain their coronavirus regulations was as trivial as taking a quiz question, he said, “No, absolutely not. However, I tell you it is important that if people want to understand the exact restrictions they have in areas that are more restricted, go to the (local authorities) websites. & # 39;

A terrible day for the government began yesterday when Skills Minister Gillian Keegan suffered a series of car accident interviews Tuesday morning, admitting that she was unable to answer key questions about new curbs taking effect from midnight.

After a speech at Exeter College in Devon, Johnson was later asked about the Northeast lockdown and said: “Under the rule of six outside areas like the Northeast where additional action has been taken, there are six inside and six outside.

Coronavirus 'could be worse for North-South divide than Thatcher', says Manchester mayor

Coronavirus could be worse for the north of England than Margaret Thatcher, Greater Manchester mayor Andy Burnham has said.

Mr Burnham said local restrictions to combat the spread of the virus could 'massively increase' England's north-south divide and called for more support for businesses in Bolton, which has the strictest lockdown measures in the region.

The Conservative leader of Bolton Council, David Greenhalgh, also said he was pleading with the Government to recognise the disparity between boroughs as he claimed the town's hospitality businesses had been 'thrown to the lions'.

Speaking at a weekly coronavirus press briefing, Mr Burnham said: 'If we go into a winter with the north under local restrictions, millions of people under restrictions, businesses suffering because of those restrictions, no support for those businesses, we are going to see a widening of the north-south divide.

'If you look back in years to come you'll think Covid-19 did more harm to the north of England than Margaret Thatcher and whatever she did in the 1980s.

'This is a real danger that is staring us right in the face.

'A government that says it wants to level up cannot put the north of England under restrictions without support. It's pretty much as simple as that.'

“And in the northeast and other areas where particularly strict measures have been taken, you should follow instructions from local authorities.

“But it's six in a house or six in hospitality, but as I understand it, not six outside. That's the situation there. & # 39;

Whitehall sources claimed No10 was blind to Matt Hancock's decision to push the new restrictions, which were only expected later this week.

Former minister Steve Baker, one of the rebel ringleaders pushing for parliament to get a bigger role in deciding lockdown, said it demonstrated the confusion that was being caused.

He told BBC Radio 4's Today program: “I think it was a vivid example of the problems you have when a hundred laws of parliament are used to introduce 247, I believe, pieces of delegated legislation that repeats must be change and revocation.

“When you get such a big and changing law, you even find ministers and the prime minister can't keep up.

What possible hope can the public have? I had a minister say to me yesterday, with horror in my eyes at the disease, that we may have to change the law every 24 hours.

"We can't possibly expect 70 million people to keep up with the law, which changes every 24 hours – that would be chaos and ruin."

Senior Tory Sir Bernard Jenkin also turned up the temperature by accusing ministers of using science for 'propaganda'.

"We saw during the Iraq war that intelligence agencies were used as propaganda," he told Times Radio.

"The scientists are not there to explain what the government has deemed necessary."

Mr Sharma defended the way restrictions were being rushed through.

'The reason we are sometimes having to bring these in pretty quickly is to actually keep people safe – and I know all parliamentarians, Steve (Baker) and others totally get that – and the issue is the scrutiny,' he said.

“If we've put restrictions in place, we have to make sure that there is a vote within 28 days, otherwise they will expire.

"But colleagues are asking if there is some way before decisions are made that they can be involved and I know that we in the government will look into this and come up with some suggestions."

Reading the riot act to the PM as he sat silently in the chamber, Sir Lindsay made clear that he is ready to side with dozens of Tory rebels and opposition parties to ensure more scrutiny - warning that the government's must act now to restore 'trust'

Reading the riot act to the PM as he sat silently in the chamber, Sir Lindsay made clear that he is ready to side with dozens of Tory rebels and opposition parties to ensure more scrutiny – warning that the government's must act now to restore 'trust'

Pictured left to right, Boris Johnson, new Cabinet Secretary Simon Case, Matt Hancock and Michael Gove leaving Downing Street for the Foreign Office today, where Cabinet is held because there is more space for social distancing

Pictured left to right, Boris Johnson, new Cabinet Secretary Simon Case, Matt Hancock and Michael Gove leaving Downing Street for the Foreign Office today, where Cabinet is held because there is more space for social distancing

LIVERPOOL IS BEING 'CLOSELY MONITORED' OVER SPIKE IN CASES

The weekly infection rate in Liverpool now stands at 258.4 per 100,000 people. Liverpool would be the first city to have a two-week lockdown

The weekly infection rate in Liverpool now stands at 258.4 per 100,000 people. Liverpool would be the first city to have a two-week lockdown

Number 10 today said it was 'closely monitoring' Liverpool's rising infection rate after its mayor said the city was just 'days away' from having to introduce a two-week circuit-breaker lockdown.

Boris Johnson's official spokesman said officials are 'constantly reviewing' the area's coronavirus restrictions – after Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson called for a full lockdown to restrict the virus from spreading.

The weekly infection rate in Liverpool now stands at 258.4 per 100,000 people. It would be the first city to have a two-week lockdown, which could also include parts of the wider region.

However, at a conference of local leaders this afternoon, Metro Mayor Steve Rotherham distanced himself from Mr Anderson's call for a two-week lockdown and said he had never discussed this idea with the Government in Westminster.

Mr Rotherham said he is meeting with all the region's leaders meeting after the press conference.

The North East was made subject to new restrictions this morning, with people banned from meeting anyone inside unless they are part of their Covid bubble. However this stopped short of a full lockdown that would shut pubs and restaurants.

When asked if there would be concessions, the minister said: "We are looking around, as I said – I do not want to anticipate anything that will come of it."

The Prime Minister's mistake had nasty echoes from Lucas' skit that aired on Channel 4 at the start of the Great British Bake Off last week.

The comedian was dressed as Mr. Johnson and was attending a fake press conference on Downing Street. Lucas mocked the complicated rules, telling people to "bake in a tent" if they have to, before adding, "don't bake in a tent."

The Government has been desperately trying all week to soothe a mutiny among dozens of MPs who had lined up behind the amendment tabled by backbench chief Sir Graham Brady.

It insisted that Commons votes should be held before any future curbs are put in place.

A Tory MP in the northeast told the Telegraph: "What happened to Boris only reinforced the case for greater parliamentary scrutiny of new rules. He can't figure out the rules because they have no logic. & # 39;

Mr Johnson rushed to defuse the series via his undercover statement of the lockdown within hours and rarely apologized.

"Sorry, I misspelled it today," he wrote.

“In the Northeast, new rules mean you can't meet people from different households in indoor social settings, including pubs, restaurants, and at home.

“You should also avoid coming into contact with other households outside.

& # 39; This is important in order to control the spread of the coronavirus and keep everyone safe. If you are in a high risk area, please continue to follow guidelines from local authorities. & # 39;

While the Prime Minister has defended his advice and expertise, which has resulted in local bans and early pub closings, Tory MPs have laid their anger on the couple for the past few days, calling for them to be fired.

The government's use of the full powers granted by parliament at the start of the coronavirus crisis has fueled growing discontent among Tories.

The Coronavirus Act 2020, which together with the Health Protection Act of 1984 underpins the lockdown, must be renewed every six months. The vote is due tomorrow.

But ministers have tried to come to an agreement with Sir Graham's rebel gang after threatening to derail the process. The government is now expected to undertake to hold votes where practicable before further restrictions are imposed.

Senior Tory Steve Baker has compared some of the government's coronavirus restrictions to George Orwell's dystopian novel 1984, specifically pointing out a ban on singing and dancing in bars, cafes and restaurants.

The prime minister is also under increasing pressure from hard-hit hotel managers to call for a constant 10 p.m. curfew review.

More than 100 of the UK's largest restaurant chains, including Wetherspoon and Pizza Hut, wrote to Mr Johnson asking for a three-week review – and that it should be deleted if it can't handle the steep rise in cases.

Mr Johnson appealed to MPs to renew powers in the Coronavirus Act, saying the nation remains in "a grave situation".

“Nobody wants to do things like that. Nobody in their right mind wants to stop people from singing and dancing in pubs or from having fun in the normal way, ”he told the press conference.

"I appreciate the (Orwell) characterization, but if we all work together and solve this problem, get rid of this virus, we can move on with our strategy of keeping education open, keeping the economy moving and how I work for the day. Let's say if I believe that these medico-scientific improvements will really bring the long-term liberation we need.

“And to deliver it, we all have to work together and follow instructions. I say this with respect to my colleagues in Parliament and I know they will have the opportunity to speak on these issues, to discuss them properly and to discuss them as parliamentarians should. & # 39;

He also reiterated his commitment to more regular coronavirus debates in the House of Commons, pledging MPs to consult the government's scientific advisers more regularly.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced the concessions in the House, saying the government would 'consult Parliament' on any England-wide or UK-wide restrictions, and a vote will be held in advance 'wherever possible'

Health Secretary Matt Hancock announced the concessions in the House, saying the government would 'consult Parliament' on any England-wide or UK-wide restrictions, and a vote will be held in advance 'wherever possible'

Matt Hancock and Michael Gove today

Chief Whip Mark Spencer

Matt Hancock and Michael Gove (pictured left) were in the cabinet today, as was chief whip Mark Spencer (right) who tried to broker a deal with Tory rebels

Ex-No10 adviser urges PM to ditch scientists

Boris Johnson should stop relying on scientists and 'take responsibility' for decisions, a former No10 adviser has said.

James Frayne, who conducted focus groups and polling for the Cabinet Office but has now stopped, made the call as he critiqued the government's performance.

In an article on ConservativeHome.com, Mr Frayne said that 'PR Advice 101' was to 'wheel out the independent experts that the public trust, and play down the role of politicians'.

'So we've seen nothing but Government scientists for months,' he said.

'There are two problems with this approach. Firstly, it has implied that the scientists are ultimately in control of the situation and that there are simple, empirical decisions which can and must be made.

'This isn't true, and has given the public a false sense of security.

'Secondly, most of the scientists are poor communicators. The media love the idea of the boring, trusted scientist that the public all love. But this isn't reality.

'The scientists aren't professional communicators and putting them in positions of public influence in this way is a mistake.'

He went on: 'The Government needs to show some balls and downgrade the scientists' role as communicators, and take responsibility for what are essentially political decisions.'

However, after the Prime Minister's plea, further pressure came from the high-level group of MPs on the Liaison Committee, which Mr Johnson is allowed to question in the House of Commons.

Senior Tory MP Sir Bernard Jenkin wrote to Mr Johnson as committee chairman saying that "a majority of us" support Parliament in voting "before or immediately after the restrictions go into effect.

"The idea that such restrictions can be used without the express consent of Parliament, except in urgent cases, is not universally acceptable and can indeed be challenged by law," said Sir Bernard.

Measures have been tightened in Northumberland, Newcastle, North and South Tyneside, Gateshead, Sunderland and County Durham.

Aiming to stop a coronavirus resurgence, the health ministry said laws would prohibit indoor mixing between households, including pubs and restaurants.

However, the question remained whether the measures to be enforced with fines would include meeting people from other homes outside the hospitality industry.

When asked yesterday on BBC Radio 4's Today program, Ms. Keegan said, “I'm sorry I can't sort this out.

"I don't know the answer to that question, but I'm sure you can find out the answer to this question."

Urged when asked how to keep people informed of the latest restrictions when even ministers can't, she said, “I'm sorry I can't answer this question. I am sure there are a lot of people who could. I do not represent the northeast. & # 39;

Unrest over new rules, regulations and fines also increased after it became apparent that the authorities will have the power to use "reasonable force" to isolate people themselves.

New laws released by the government say that "reasonable force" can be used when someone refuses to obey an order to stay home after a positive coronavirus test or when they are in contact with someone else has come suffering from the disease.

The authority will be available to all "authorized persons" in reports, which could include so-called "Covid Marshalls", as well as police and council officials.

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