ENTERTAINMENT

New expiration dates for meat sold in supermarkets to give shoppers 11 days to eat more beef


The expiration dates for meat to be extended give supermarket shoppers 11 additional days to eat beef as grocery chefs are extending the expiration dates before Christmas

  • The shelf life of beef, lamb and pork has been verified by the Food Standards Agency
  • Chilled beef, including cuts with plastic sleeves, is used for ten days
  • In the future, this period is expected to be extended to 21 days in the refrigerator
  • The following is a report by UK and Australian experts funded by UK supermarkets

The expiry dates for meat sold in supermarkets are to be extended.

The heads of the Food Standards Agency, who check the shelf life of beef, lamb and pork, will give the go-ahead for longer expiry dates before Christmas.

Chilled beef, including cuts sold in plastic-wrapped trays, is currently labeled with a ten-day label. In the future, this period is expected to be increased to 21 days in the refrigerator, with pork and lamb having 15 days and 14 days respectively.

The chiefs of the Food Standards Agency, who check the shelf life of beef, lamb and pork, will give approval for longer expiration dates before Christmas (file photo).

The move follows a scientific report by UK and Australian experts funded by UK supermarkets and processors. It was found that it is possible to extend the shelf life of chilled meat without causing botulism or safety issues.

The report has already been assessed by the Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food. Emily Miles, chief executive of the FSA, has now ordered further risk assessments before reporting to the agency's board this fall.

The move is part of a new initiative to reduce 380,000 tonnes of meat waste per year in the UK, valued at £ 3 billion and responsible for four million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions per year.

It is part of an initiative to reduce 380,000 tonnes of meat waste per year in the UK, valued at £ 3 billion and responsible for four million tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions per year (file photo)

Around 243,000 tons of this meat are thrown away by households.

David Lindars, co-chair of a joint committee between the FSA and the meat industry overseeing the issue, said he expected approval before the end of the year.

Mr Lindars, Technical Operations Manager for the British Meat Processors Association, said: & # 39; We are optimistic that the shelf life will be extended.

'Ultimately, it is a decision for manufacturers and retailers to determine the shelf life of meat products. However, longer expiration dates are a major factor in reducing meat waste. "

The urgency for longer shelf life is highlighted in a new report from the Waste and Resource Action Program, which is supported by farmers, processors, retailers and the hospitality industry.

The 26-page study “Meat in a Net Zero World” also urges consumers to help reduce food waste and sets a target for 100,000 tons of uneaten meat to be reduced by 2030.

According to WRAP, households alone throw out an average of 146,000 tons of pork a year – including 34,000 tons of sausages, 22,000 tons of bacon and 21,000 tons of sliced ​​ham.

Research shows that around 20 percent of these products are unopened or almost completely packaged.

The FSA spokesman said: "We are currently reviewing the evidence of the shelf life of refrigerated fresh beef, lamb and pork using vacuum and modified atmosphere. Completion is expected by the end of this year."

The move follows a scientific report by UK and Australian experts funded by UK supermarkets and processors. It was found that it is possible to extend the shelf life of chilled meat without botulism or safety issues (file photo).

The move follows a scientific report by UK and Australian experts funded by UK supermarkets and processors. It was found that it is possible to extend the shelf life of chilled meat without botulism or safety issues (file photo).

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