TECHNOLOGY

Neo-Nazi suspect "compared National Action to Donald Trump"


A young woman who allegedly won a Miss Hitler beauty pageant attended two national action meetings after the neo-Nazi group was banned after the murder of MP Jo Cox, a court heard today.

22-year-old Alice Cutter was present at a meeting in Birmingham on January 8, 2017 and at another meeting in Manchester on August 5, 2017, the Birmingham Crown Court heard.

Liam Walker, who defended Cutter, indicated that there were eleven other group meetings that she did not attend.

22-year-old Alice Cutter (posing with a gun in an online photo) was present at a meeting in Birmingham on January 8, 2017, and in Manchester on August 5, 2017, the Birmingham Crown Court heard

Liam Walker, who defended Cutter (pictured in front of a Nazi flag), indicated that there were eleven other group meetings she did not attend

Liam Walker, who defended Cutter (pictured in front of a Nazi flag), indicated that there were eleven other group meetings she did not attend

Cutter is accused of being a member of the terrorist group that was banned in December 2016, along with her partner Mark Jones (24), Connor Scothern (18) and Gary Jack (23). Everyone denies the charges.

Mr. Walker read out messages that Cutter sent to Jones after arriving at one of the meetings at Manchester Victoria Station.

She asks why Jones wasn't there to meet her and tells him that she has a "freaking anxiety attack".

Cutter is said to have written: “I'm getting sick, I'm so scared. Why don't you pick up? I have a fucking anxiety attack in Manchester alone. What's wrong with you? & # 39;

You should then repeat the name "Mark?"

The defendants are said to have posted in an online chat group called Triple K Mafia, whose charge was National Action under a new name.

Mr. Walker said that Cutter left the Triple K Mafia chat group several times in 2017, but was resumed by the administrators.

Cutter is shown here with a gun. She is on trial at the Birmingham Crown Court and accused of being a member of the banned right-wing extremist group National Action along with three other defendants

Cutter is shown here with a gun. She is on trial at the Birmingham Crown Court and accused of being a member of the banned right-wing extremist group National Action along with three other defendants

On April 5, 2017, Cutter wrote: “I want to go all the time because I feel like I'm in a strange chat room against my will.

& # 39; I am basically. You bully me every time I try to run away & # 39;

The jury was also shown a clip of Scothern's police interview last September.

He is seen bursting into tears after being asked by an official about posts he allegedly did because he was not committed to equality.

Speaking about Cutter in his police interview, Scothern said, “She was another person I was quite friends with. She was never involved in activism.

& # 39; The group's view was that women should not interfere. She had her beliefs, but she never really wrote about it. & # 39;

Jack previously claimed that National Action's views had been shared by Donald Trump to indicate that they don't just apply to the terrorist group.

Jack used the US President's description of African countries as "damn holes" and Mexicans as "rapists" to fuel his argument.

He also asked the police if allegations of anti-Semitism against Labor leader Jeremy Corbyn made them terrorists.

Jack, middle, told the police that National Action's right-wing views were "the same as Donald Trump and Jeremy Corbyn's." He is pictured in Dudley holding the Nazi salute with (from left) Daniel Ward, Connor Scothern, Alex Deakin and Adam Thomas at the Nazi salute in Dudley. Scothern is on trial next to Jack

Jack, middle, told the police that National Action's right-wing views were "the same as Donald Trump and Jeremy Corbyn's." He is pictured in Dudley holding the Nazi salute with (from left) Daniel Ward, Connor Scothern, Alex Deakin and Adam Thomas at the Nazi salute in Dudley. Scothern is on trial next to Jack

In Birmingham Crown Court, he made the comparisons with Mr. Trump and Mr. Corbyn in a police interview after he was arrested in September 2018.

Naomi Parsons, the indictment, read Jack's testimony saying to the police: "Many of the ideas expressed in the chats were not limited to National Action.

For example, the National Front, the British National Party, and even Donald Trump share the views that National Action had, such as race, immigration, barriers, and separatism.

Donald Trump called Third World countries S *** holes and all Mexicans rapists.

Jeremy Corbyn and the Labor Party have been accused of anti-Semitism. Does that make him a member of National Action?

23-year-old Garry Jack, who delivered a Nazi salute in 2016, is brought to justice for being part of the group's prohibited national action

23-year-old Garry Jack, who delivered a Nazi salute in 2016, is brought to justice for being part of the group's prohibited national action

“Fascism and National Socialism are ideas that have been around for hundreds of years and that are not exclusively reserved for national action. Post-ban discussions may be uncomfortable, but I don't think they're illegal. & # 39;

Jack claimed that he continued to communicate with other suspected members of the group after the ban because "he didn't have many friends."

He said to the officials, “The purpose was to keep in touch with friends. In my opinion, National Action was dead.

“Any contact with people after the ban served no illegal purpose, such as continuing national action. National Action died in December 2016.

“I don't think meeting people after the ban qualifies as a National Action member.

& # 39; National Action has not invented any of its guidelines.

"I'm not going out, I don't have many friends. I am autistic and very afraid. These guys are my only friends.

“I had no idea that these people would continue the national action.

"I have a mixed niece that I love very much and the last thing I want is a racial war."

When asked about his multiracial niece and non-white stepbrother, he replied, "I am not annoyed with anyone in my family and my love for my family is unconditional."

The jury was also shown rough pictures that were saved by the other members who were accused of being part of the National Action.

Scothern's Motorola phone was seized by the police after he was arrested last September.

Cutter, Scothern's fiancee, is said to have participated in a "Miss Hitler" beauty pageant

Connor Scothern pictured at Birmingham Crown Court during the trial

Jack said he sent messages to Cutter (left) and Scothern (right) because he wanted to keep in touch with them as friends and said he thought "National Action was dead".

An offensive picture of a black toddler was found in a kind of glass tank, the text describing her as a "pet" and comparing the child to an iguana.

The jury heard that the police had also found a number of worrying memes on Jones' Samsung phone in September 2017.

One shows a Nazi death squad called "the young" and executes Jews called "cold".

Another shows an emaciated person who may be an inmate of a concentration camp with the text: "Jew – why don't you eat anything?"

The jury was also shown a sheet over 1.5 meters long, which was found at Scothern's address.

The court had previously heard that Scothern said in a police interview that the bow belonged to convicted National Action member Nathan Pryke.

Cutter and Jones from Halifax, West Yorkshire contest the charges alongside Scothern from Nottingham and Jack from Birmingham.

The process continues.

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