ENTERTAINMENT

National Trust lists HUNDRED properties that it believes have links to slavery and colonialism


National Trust includes former homes of Winston Churchill and Rudyard Kipling on its list of HUNDRED properties it believes have "links to slavery and colonialism."

  • Nearly 100 National Trust properties have links to colonialism, the charity says
  • Sir Winston Churchill's former family home in Kent, Chartwell, was trapped
  • The National Trust was charged with playing the woke tune after the audit
  • However, the charity has a duty to inform visitors about the origin of the properties

Winston Churchill and Rudyard Kipling's homes are among nearly 100 National Trust properties that the charity says have been linked to slavery and colonialism.

Churchill's former family home in Kent, Chartwell, has been included along with several other well-known properties associated with leading figures in the East India Company.

The exam, released on Monday, accused the cultural heritage nonprofit of smearing key figures from British history.

National Trust members have threatened to cancel subscriptions and boycott the charity, and the organization has been accused of "playing the woke tune".

Nearly 100 National Trust properties have links to slavery and colonialism, including Sir Winston Churchill's former family home in Kent, Chartwell (above)

The National Trust said it did not want to censor the story but added that it had a duty to inform its visitors of the origins of its properties (above Churchill's former home, Chartwell).

The Trust has insisted that it does not want to censor the story, but that it has a duty to ensure that its supporters and visitors are informed about the origins of some of its properties.

But Lucy Trimnell, a Conservative Somerset councilor, wrote online that she would be terminating her family's membership, adding that she cannot support the naming and shame of innocent families who have left these traits in the care of the National Trust ".

The Trust said the year-long trial was ordered prior to protests against Black Lives Matters when a statue of Edward Colston was torn from a pedestal and dumped into a harbor in Bristol for his role in the city's slave trade.

The National Trust, which has 5.6 million members and 500 historic sites across the UK, commissioned the report last September.

The audit contains details of the properties' links to slave traders, but also to families whose plantations did slave labor and who were paid compensation after the slave trade was abolished.

29 trust properties have links to successful claims for damages, including Glastonbury Tor in Somerset and Blickling Hall in Norfolk.

The report also highlights figures implicated in British colonial history, including author Kipling and historian Thomas Carlyle, whose former homes are now run by the Trust.

The meeting rooms in Bath (above) were named in the report because of the city's links to the larger colonial and slave economies in the 18th century

The meeting rooms in Bath (above) were named in the report because of the city's ties to the larger colonial and slave economies in the 18th century

Robert Clive, a British officer with the East India Company, was instrumental in Britain's colonial dominance in India and collected Indian artifacts housed in Powis Castle (above) in Wales

The charity is alleged to have smeared key figures from British history when Churchill's former family home took the exam

Powis Castle was included in the exam because of his ties to Robert Clive (above), a British officer with the East India Company

The charity is alleged to have smeared key figures from British history when the former family home of Churchill (left) and Powis Castle connected to Robert Clive (right) took the exam

Powis Castle in Mid Wales was included because of its ties to Robert Clive, known as the Clive of India.

The British officer of the East India Company played a key role in Britain's colonial dominance in India and amassed a large collection of Indian artifacts now housed in Powis.

Meanwhile, the meeting rooms in Bath were named because of the city's ties to the larger colonial and slave economies in the 18th century.

The survey also listed properties belonging to people who fought against the exploitation of colonial power and the slave trade.

Dr. Tarnya Cooper, curator and collections director for the National Trust, said the charity has a duty to research and share information.

She added, "A significant number of these (traits) in our care have links to colonization of different parts of the world and some to historical slavery."

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