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More than 60% of the population in Wales will be on lockdown from tomorrow


Another 5,693 people tested positive for coronavirus in the UK today – a 46 percent increase from last Sunday's total.

The surge brings the total number of cases in the UK to 434,969 while another 17 people died from the disease, according to the government's Covid-19 UK dashboard.

Today's death toll, which covers deaths in hospitals, nursing homes and across the community, brings the total death toll during the pandemic to 41,988.

Last Sunday, 3,899 people were diagnosed with the error, significantly fewer than this week – this is the highest Sunday number since April.

However, many experts say the daily test totals don't compare to the same totals at the height of the pandemic, when the country's testing program was much smaller.

It is believed that more than 100,000 people developed the virus every day at the height of the pandemic.

Today's numbers follow news that 60 percent of the Welsh population will be placed under coronavirus lockdown starting tomorrow after three more community areas were added to the government's list.

In other coronavirus news:

  • Boris Johnson abandoned plans for a second national lockdown fearing Rishi Sunak might stop, a senior MP said.
  • Mr Sunak's deputy yesterday dropped proposals for a rift between the Chancellor and Mr Johnson over the government's coronavirus strategy.
  • Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden alleged the Tory rebels' fears of ministers imposing coronavirus restrictions without asking MPs to vote on them first were "exaggerated".
  • Sunday's poll found that voters are now more concerned about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the economy than they are about the nation's collective health.
  • Mr. Sunak's ratings continue to increase with an approval rating of plus 37. Mr Johnson, on the other hand, receives a rating of minus 17;
  • Burnley is England's new coronavirus hotspot as it calculates the rolling 7-day new case rate for Covid-19 for local authorities in England.
  • Professor Mark Woolhouse, who is a member of the government's Pandemic Influenza Scientific Modeling Group (SPI-M), said a third wave of infections next year is "quite possible."
  • The government will perform a "gargle-and-spit" test on Covid-19 as part of Matt Hancock's promise to test 4.5 million people a day.
  • The government's test and trace app has been criticized for glaring bugs that prevented thousands from logging their test results.
  • Thousands of students are currently on lockdown at Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) to help stem the rise in cases on campus.

In the past 24 hours alone, 362 new cases of coronavirus have been reported in Wales, bringing the total to 22,945 – but no new deaths.

Under Port Talbot, Torfaen and the Valley of Glamorgan are covered by the rules, which means people cannot enter or leave the areas on Monday after 6pm without a reasonable apology.

Residents cannot meet indoors with someone they do not live with as extended households are suspended.

In Scotland, 344 people tested positive, where another death was reported.

Under Port Talbot, Torfaen and the Glamorgan Valley will be put under coronavirus lockdown from tomorrow

Under Port Talbot, Torfaen and the Glamorgan Valley will be put under coronavirus lockdown from tomorrow

A face-covered woman walks through Cardiff, South Wales on September 27th before the lockdown resumes

A face-covered woman walks through Cardiff, South Wales on September 27th before the lockdown resumes

A police car patrols St Mary Street in Cardiff, Wales on September 26, 2020. Pubs, bars and restaurants are subject to a 10 p.m. curfew

A police car patrols St Mary Street in Cardiff, Wales on September 26, 2020. Pubs, bars and restaurants are subject to a 10 p.m. curfew

The announcement comes just hours before local lockdown restrictions come into effect in Cardiff and Swansea, Wales' two largest cities, on Sunday evening.

Further measures were introduced on Saturday evening at Llanelli in Carmarthenshire.

Restrictions are already in place in Blaenau Gwent, Bridgend, Caerphilly, Merthyr Tydfil, Newport and Rhondda Cynon Taf.

This means that more than 1.8 million people in Wales – nearly 60 percent of the population – will be on-site as of Monday evening.

There were an additional 370 confirmed cases of Covid-19 in Wales on Saturday.

Welsh Prime Minister Mark Drakeford said in a statement: "After a worrying spike in coronavirus cases across South Wales, we took action on Friday to introduce local coronavirus restrictions in Llanelli. Local restrictions will go into effect in our two largest cities – Cardiff and Swansea – tonight.

& # 39; We are now taking further action and applying local restrictions to three more areas in South Wales – Neath Port Talbot, Torfaen and the Glamorgan Valley – because we are seeing rising rates in these three areas. These areas also border local authorities where rates are much higher.

& # 39; Imposing restrictions in any part of Wales is always an incredibly difficult decision for us. But we are acting to protect people's health and to try to break the chain of transmission and prevent the situation from getting worse.

“This is not a regional lockdown – this is a series of local restrictions in each area of ​​local government to respond to a particular surge in cases in each area that have different and unique chains of transmission.

Cars at a drive through coronavirus testing station in Ebbw Vale in Wales. The latest restrictions mean that more than 1.8 million people in Wales - nearly 60 percent of the population - will be on-site as of Monday evening

Cars at a drive-through coronavirus testing station in Ebbw Vale in Wales. The latest restrictions mean that more than 1.8 million people in Wales – nearly 60 percent of the population – will be on-site as of Monday evening

& # 39; In some places, like Caerphilly and Newport, we've seen really positive declines in response and we hope they can relax if they keep going.

“It's really important that everyone obey the rules by which they live. We need everyone's help to get the coronavirus under control. We need everyone to pull together and follow the measures designed to protect you and your loved ones. & # 39;

Yesterday, Burnley was announced as England's new coronavirus hotspot as the 7-day rolling new case rate for Covid-19 is calculated for local authorities in England.

The numbers for the seven days leading up to September 23 are based on tests conducted in laboratories (Pillar 1 of the government's testing program) and in the wider community (Pillar 2).

The rate is expressed as the number of new cases per 100,000 people.

Data for the last three days (September 24-26) have been excluded because they are incomplete and likely to be revised.

In Burnley, 228 new cases were recorded in the seven days ended September 23, the equivalent of 256.4 per 100,000 people.

Burnley has the highest rate in England, of 145.1 in the seven days leading up to September 16.

Liverpool has the second highest rate of 131.1 to 243.8 with 1,214 new cases.

Knowsley ranks third, where the rate rose from 132.6 to 241.9 with 365 new cases.

The list is based on data from Public Health England released on the government's coronavirus dashboard on Sept. 26.

Last night, night owls flocked to the country's streets after being kicked out of bars and pubs at 10 p.m.

In Soho, London, huge crowds of Saturday night drinkers were seen walking on empty streets while others rushed to buy liquor from licenses in Leeds after newly imposed rules meant the venues were closed prematurely.

Meanwhile, a huge line of people formed outside Tesco Express in Portsmouth, Hampshire, and many chose to keep the night going with cans and bottles bought at the grocery store.

In the popular waterfront district of Bristol, in the streets of the nightlife hotspot Newcastle and in the student city of York, crowds of alcohol also gathered.

Matt Hancock's new coronavirus tracing app was hit by another fiasco last night after tens of thousands of users were prevented from logging their test results

Matt Hancock's new coronavirus tracing app was hit by another fiasco last night after tens of thousands of users were prevented from logging their test results

The Deltapoll poll shows that a majority of people - 51 percent - think that the impact on the economy is the biggest problem the UK will face over the next year

The Deltapoll poll shows that a majority of people – 51 percent – think that the impact on the economy is the biggest problem the UK will face over the next year

In Liverpool, mask-free rule breakers gathered in large numbers in the street, jumping and singing at an impromptu party. Scenes in Liverpool led the city's mayor to criticize the curfew as "just making it worse, not better".

The influx of happy party-goers increased the risk of spreading the virus even more than they huddled on public transport – after Uber rates rose 2.6 percent due to increased demand in London.

There are currently thousands of students on curfew, some of whom face security measures and the threat of fines to curb the surge in cases on the Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU) campus.

It is one of at least 32 universities in the UK that have confirmed cases of coronavirus.

University of Edinburgh Professor Mark Woolhouse, who is a member of the government's Pandemic Influenza Scientific Modeling Group (SPI-M), said a third wave of infections next year is "quite possible".

He warned Britain against having to live with the virus until "some type of cavalry" comes to the rescue of the nation in the form of a vaccine or rapid test, and said he was "doubtful" that a sting in six years' time for mass introduction will be ready months.

The Prime Minister's decision to impose the 10 p.m. curfew to avoid a possible second wave came under fire after it was revealed that the move was not endorsed by Sage – the panel of scientific experts chaired by Sir Patrick Vallance.

According to the Daily Telegraph, wise members are becoming increasingly frustrated with being outvoted while being scapegoated for tougher measures.

A former director of the World Health Organization, Professor Karol Sikora, also raised concerns, saying, “Where is the evidence? Closing a little early is going to hurt so many business owners. & # 39;

Wise scholars are reportedly calling on the government to publish their advice in order to rid them of any involvement in dealing with a pub curfew.

Concerns about the potential impact on businesses appear to be confirmed by the rest of the population, as a mail on Sunday revealed that voters are now more concerned about the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the economy than about the nation's collective health.

The Deltapoll poll shows that a majority of people – 51 percent – think the impact on the economy will be the biggest problem for the UK over the next year, compared with 42 percent who are concerned about the health impact .

When asked about the effects over the next five years, the gap widens: 66 percent cite the economy and only 28 percent mention health.

And an overwhelming 89 percent are concerned about the impact of the Covid restrictions – including the 10 p.m. curfew on business – with just 8 percent saying they won't be affected.

The results suggest that there is growing support for the position of Chancellor Rishi Sunak, who has argued in the Cabinet against "pigeons" such as Health Secretary Matt Hancock and Cabinet Secretary Michael Gove calling for stricter restrictions.

A huge line of people formed in front of the Tesco Express in Portsmouth, Hampshire. Many chose to keep the night going with cans and bottles bought in a supermarket

A huge line of people formed in front of the Tesco Express in Portsmouth, Hampshire. Many chose to keep the night going with cans and bottles bought in a supermarket

Crowds also took to the streets of Brighton city center after the pubs closed at 10pm on Saturday night

Crowds also took to the streets of Brighton city center after the pubs closed at 10pm on Saturday night

Groups of revelers were in Soho, London last night when Health Secretary Matt Hancock said there had been "an acceleration in Covid-19 cases across the country".

Groups of revelers were in Soho, London last night when Health Secretary Matt Hancock said there had been "an acceleration in Covid-19 cases across the country".

Mr. Sunak's ratings continue to rise with an approval rating of plus 37. Boris Johnson, on the other hand, receives a rating of minus 17.

A senior MP announced today that Boris Johnson has abandoned plans for a second national lockdown amid fears Rishi Sunak may quit if rift claims deepen.

Mr. Sunak warned that the economic impact of a second national lockdown would make his work nearly impossible.

He argued to keep the UK open to protect millions of jobs and businesses, although medical and scientific experts want tighter restrictions to stop the virus from spreading, The Sun reported.

In York, huge crowds gathered in the streets to keep the party going after restaurants closed at 10 p.m.

In York, huge crowds gathered in the streets to keep the party going after restaurants closed at 10 p.m.

Police officers were on patrol in Soho, London, before closure after pubs and restaurants were put on curfew at 10 p.m. to combat the surge in coronavirus cases

Police officers were on patrol in Soho, London, before closure after pubs and restaurants were put on curfew at 10 p.m. to combat the surge in coronavirus cases

The Chancellor has put in place a number of measures to save jobs and businesses during the pandemic, including the job retention program and Eat Out To Help Out.

A senior MP said: “There were fears that if ignored, he would have a hard time moving on.

“It was all up to the Chancellor that we avoided knocking the economy down and instead chose a more balanced approach. Rishi saved the day. & # 39;

Yesterday, Mr. Sunak's deputy dropped proposals for a rift between the Chancellor and Mr. Johnson over the government's coronavirus strategy.

Treasury Secretary's Chief Secretary Stephen Barclay insisted that the two men "worked together" and denied that numbers 10 and 11 have any different approaches.

The 1922 committee chairman Sir Graham Brady has tabled an amendment requiring new rules to be voted on before they come into force

The 1922 committee chairman Sir Graham Brady has tabled an amendment requiring new rules to be voted on before they come into effect

On Thursday, Mr Sunak said the nation must learn to "live without fear" just days after the prime minister tightened coronavirus laws while cases rose sharply.

Rumors of a rift emerged amid Tory rebel fears about ministers imposing coronavirus restrictions without asking MPs to vote on them.

The government will this week call on MPs to extend the coronavirus emergency powers for an additional six months.

However, Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Conservative Backers' Committee, has tabled an amendment that would require a vote on new measures "as soon as possible".

Sir Graham is believed to now have the support of 60 of his Tory colleagues ahead of a possible crunch vote on Wednesday.

And restrictions have been put in place on items like flour and eggs, which were the fastest to go away during the country's initial lockdown. Pictured: Empty shelves at the Asda Superstore in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

And restrictions were put in place on items like flour and eggs, which were the fastest to go away during the country's initial lockdown. Pictured: Empty shelves at the Asda Superstore in Barnes Hill, Birmingham

One of the supporters of the amendment, former Brexit Minister Steve Baker, argued today that "freedom dies" when governments are allowed to "exercise draconian powers without prior parliamentary scrutiny".

However, Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden defended the government's current approach of enforcing rules without a parliamentary vote as he said Mr Baker's concerns were "slightly exaggerated".

The cabinet minister said the "rapidly changing" nature of the pandemic means that the government must "retain the power to move quickly".

The British seem to be feeling fears of a possible second spike as panic buying resumed across the UK.

Customers reporting a 20 minute queue to enter stores before further delays at checkouts.

And online customers found it next to impossible to get delivery slots from Asda, Morrisons, Ocado, Sainsbury & # 39; s and Tesco – some had no free slots for up to two weeks.

One method of avoiding a possible second wave is the government's search function, which has already been criticized many times.

It was reported today that pubs and restaurants are turning away customers who don't have the "pathetic" app, despite glaring bugs that prevented thousands from logging their test results.

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