ENTERTAINMENT

Ministers are "not forgiven" if they do not act on the pelvic network scandal


The ministers are "not forgiven" if they do not tackle the pelvic network scandal that has ruined thousands of lives, the author of the damn report warns

  • Network implants have been reported to harm thousands of women and children in the UK
  • Baroness Cumberlege, who led the investigation, said the patients had been waiting "too long".
  • Health Minister Matt Hancock apologized to the sufferers
  • The review examined people who were harmed by 3 products – pelvic mesh implants, hormone pregnancy test drug Primodos, and epilepsy drug sodium valproate

Ministers will not be forgiven for failing to cope with a series of health scandals, the author of a damn report warned yesterday.

Tens of thousands of women and children have suffered catastrophic damage from an "unresponsive and defensive" health care system.

Baroness Cumberlege, who led the investigation into pelvic implants, pregnancy test medication and epilepsy treatment, said these patients had been waiting "too long" to be heard.

Health Minister Matt Hancock said yesterday, "I would like to apologize to the sufferers and their families for the frustration and time it takes to hear their voices."

Baroness Cumberlege, who led the investigation into pelvic implants, pregnancy test medication and epilepsy treatment, said these patients had been waiting "too long" to be heard

"And now that their voices have been heard, it is very important that we learn from this report."

The report said countless lives had been ruined by the pain and suffering caused by three preventable health disasters.

Baroness Cumberlege, a former Tory health minister, called for urgent restructuring to free the NHS from an "arrogant and dismissive culture," which led many doctors to write down patients' debilitating symptoms as "women's problems."

When it released the 277-page report yesterday, it warned the government that these mistakes should not be repeated and urged ministers to set up a task force to implement the "radical and far-reaching" recommendations.

"I have to say if this government and the health system ignore our review and another drug and medical device harms people to the extent that we've seen it, and it shouldn't be forgiven," she said.

Health Minister Matt Hancock said yesterday, "I would like to apologize to the sufferers and their families for the frustration and time it takes to hear their voices."

Health Minister Matt Hancock said yesterday, "I would like to apologize to the sufferers and their families for the frustration and time it takes to hear their voices."

Research into people who were harmed by three products – pelvic mesh implants, hormone pregnancy test drug Primodos, and epilepsy drug sodium valproate – revealed decades of errors.

The NHS, private healthcare providers, manufacturers, and government regulators have all been criticized for not listening to patients or not recognizing the signs when something went badly wrong.

The review called for measures such as the appointment of an independent security commissioner, a revision of the regulator for medicines and health products, and compensation for the victims.

The panel of experts appointed by former Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt listened to the "harrowing reports" of more than 700 families across the UK for two years.

Baroness Cumberlege sentenced manufacturers, regulators and surgeons for not doing enough to track down those affected by mesh, which the Daily Mail Good Health team has been doing for nearly a decade.

Excruciating pain means that even washing dishes is in tears

Lisa Morland, 49, explains how unbearable pain can make her cry with simple household chores

Lisa Morland, 49, explains how unbearable pain can make her cry with simple household chores

For once, for Lisa Morland they were the simplest everyday tasks.

But nowadays the physical exertion of cooking a family meal or washing the dishes is enough to break them into tears.

Ms. Morland wished she had been informed of the possible long-term effects of the pool network before having it installed in 2015.

The 49-year-old customer service consultant from Newcastle upon Tyne was operated on for stress urinary incontinence caused by physical movements such as laughing, coughing or heavy lifting.

She had no side effects in the first year after the operation. But then she struggled with constipation, urination problems, abdominal pain and pain around her hips and back.

"I find it very difficult to walk now – walking 20 minutes on foot, even if I only do a small shop, causes excruciating pain that makes me cry," she said. "Normal everyday tasks like cooking a family meal, ironing, vacuuming or washing dishes have the same effect."

Ms. Morland now hopes that the network will be removed.

She added, "I could have learned the truth, all the facts about what could go wrong – that manufacturers knew 11 years before my operation that this network could shrink, erode, and do more harm than good."

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