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Millions of Britons stay home on Memorial Sunday while commemorations go online


The Queen, Prince Charles and Prime Minister Boris Johnson lead politicians and kings who pay tribute to Britain's war dead today at the cenotaph.

There was strict social distancing to allow the ceremony to take place this morning despite the threat of the coronavirus.

The public was unable to attend due to lockdown restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic. Millions of people across the UK instead privately paid their respects from home while others went to their local war memorials to hold socially detached ceremonies.

Typically around 10,000 veterans would pay their respects at the cenotaph, but this year there were only 26 due to the risks posed by Covid-19.

In addition to Mr Johnson and Labor Leader Sir Keir, former Prime Ministers David Cameron, Tony Blair and Theresa May, Chancellor Rishi Sunak, Home Secretary Priti Patel and Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey were also present.

As the clock struck 11 a.m., Mr Johnson, Prince Charles, Prince William and other members of the British elite marked the two-minute silence before laying their wreaths.

The Queen watched from the royal chest in the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office as Prince Charles laid a wreath for her.

Prince William and the Duchess of Cambridge were also present along with Prince Edward and his wife, the Countess of Wessex.

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The Queen, Prince Charles and Prime Minister Boris Johnson lead politicians and kings who pay their respects to Britain's war dead today at the cenotaph

There is strict social distancing to allow the ceremony to take place this morning despite the threat of the coronavirus. Pictured: The Duchess of Cornwall and Duchess of Cambridge keep their distance as they watch the memorial services on Sunday

There is strict social distancing to allow the ceremony to take place this morning despite the threat of the coronavirus. Pictured: The Duchess of Cornwall and Duchess of Cambridge keep their distance as they watch the memorial services on Sunday

The public cannot attend due to lockdown restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic. Millions of people across the UK will instead pay their respects in the privacy of their homes

The public cannot attend due to lockdown restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic. Millions of people across the UK will instead pay their respects in the privacy of their homes

Today's Sunday memorial service is taking place but the UK public cannot attend as usual due to the coronavirus pandemic. Pictured: The military band is playing in the cenotaph this morning

Today's Sunday memorial service is taking place but the UK public cannot attend as usual due to the coronavirus pandemic. Pictured: The military band is playing in the cenotaph this morning

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a beret-style allure and a coat with military-style detailing when she joined her husband Prince William at the cenotaph

The Duchess of Cornwall was standing two meters from her on the balcony overlooking the commemorations

The Duchess of Cambridge wore a beret-style allure and a coat with military-style detailing when she joined her husband Prince William at the cenotaph. The Duchess of Cornwall was standing two meters from her on the balcony overlooking the commemorations

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and union leader Sir Keir Starmer were among the leaders who laid wreaths on the cenotaph this morning

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and union leader Sir Keir Starmer were among the leaders who laid wreaths on the cenotaph this morning

The annual Sunday memorial service will be held this morning but the public will not be able to attend due to lockdown restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic

The annual Sunday memorial service will be held this morning but the public will not be able to attend due to lockdown restrictions due to the coronavirus pandemic

Princess Anne, the Princess Royal, was also at the memorial service.

The first blow of eleven from Big Ben signaled the beginning of the two-minute silence.

A military weapon was fired to mark the end of the silent tribute observed at war memorials across the country, and the final post was triggered by the Buglers of the Royal Marines.

The first wreath was laid by the Prince of Wales, followed by Captain James Boughey, who laid a wreath on behalf of the Duke of Edinburgh, who has withdrawn from public royal duties.

Charles then left his own floral tribute and was persecuted by the Duke of Cambridge, Earl of Wessex and Princess Royal before the politicians laid their wreaths.

The Duke of York did not attend the event after stepping down from official royal duties following heavy criticism following his Panorama interview about his friendship with sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

Ahead of today's service, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said "no virus can stop us" from remembering the country's war dead as he paid his respects at a low-key event on Saturday at the Uxbridge War Memorial in west London.

He said: “We come together every November to remember the soldiers and women from Britain and the Commonwealth who gave their lives for our freedom.

“During this difficult time, no virus can stop us from honoring her memory, especially when we have just celebrated the 75th anniversary of Victory in World War II.

“And our honors are even more important in times of trial. So let's get together again and remember those to whom we owe so much. & # 39;

In a video message prior to attending the Memorial Sunday service, union leader Sir Keir Starmer said: “2020 has been a year of struggle and sacrifice and we know that many challenges lie ahead.

The Queen watched from the royal chest near the cenotaph as Prince Charles laid a wreath for her

The Queen watched from the royal chest near the cenotaph as Prince Charles laid a wreath for her

Mr Johnson was the first British politician to put a wreath on the cenotaph this morning when Britain marked Remembrance Sunday

Mr Johnson was the first British politician to put a wreath on the cenotaph this morning when Britain marked Remembrance Sunday

Prince William followed his father by laying a wreath at the base of the cenotaph. The most famous British politicians joined him

Prince William followed his father by laying a wreath at the base of the cenotaph. The most famous British politicians joined him

Home Secretary Priti Patel was among the government officials to lay a wreath on the cenotaph

Home Secretary Priti Patel was among the government officials to lay a wreath on the cenotaph

Former Prime Ministers John Major (left) and Tony Blair also laid wreaths on the cenotaph on Sunday

Former Prime Ministers John Major (left) and Tony Blair also laid wreaths on the cenotaph on Sunday

Prince Harry "deeply saddened" after his request to have a wreath laid in his name "rejected" by Buckingham Palace

The Duke of Sussex has reportedly been refused permission to place a wreath on the cenotaph on his behalf today in the latest sign of a family rift.

Prince Harry, who had spent ten years in the armed forces, made the personal request to Buckingham Palace but was turned down because he resigned from his royal duties in March, The Times reported.

The Queen was not believed to have been informed of the request or its rejection, which allegedly "deeply saddened" the Duke of Sussex, the publication said.

Prince Harry highlighted the importance of Memorial Sunday during an appearance on a military podcast to mark the event, which will air today.

In an interview with the shared podcast, he described the day as "a moment of respect and hope".

The former king said, “The act of remembering, remembering is a profound act of honor. In this way, we preserve the legacy of entire generations and give thanks for the sacrifices they have made so that we can lead the life we ​​live today. & # 39;

In recent years, the Duke has marked the day with visits to the cenotaph (pictured) and the memory field at Westminster Abbey in 2016

In recent years, the Duke has marked the day with visits to the cenotaph (pictured) and the memory field of Westminster Abbey in 2016

“But in these troubled times, when we need inspiration, we can always look with pride, not just on our war generations or those currently serving our nation at home and abroad, but on all of our soldiers and women who served during this pandemic have stood side by side with our key workers in the fight against this virus.

“On this special Memorial Sunday, celebrating 80 years since the Battle of Britain and 75 years since the end of World War II, we would like to thank everyone who has served and everyone who continues to serve this great country. & # 39;

Sir Kier had walked down Downing Street along with Mr Johnson, Chancellor Rishi Sunak, former Prime Ministers Tony Blair and David Cameron, Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey and the leader of the SNP in the House of Commons Sir Ian Blackford on his way down Downing Street to the cenotaph on Sunday .

Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, resigned as a working member of the royal family and now lives in California.

In a commemorative Sunday podcast, the former army officer said: “To be able to wear my uniform, to be in the service of one's own country, is one of the greatest honors in life.

“For me, the uniform is a symbol of something much bigger, a symbol of our commitment to protecting our country and protecting our values.

"These values ​​are put into action through service, and service is what happens in silence and chaos."

In a brief ceremony at Westminster Abbey on Wednesday, the Queen commemorated the 100th anniversary of the funeral of the Unknown Warrior who represents World War I soldiers whose place of death is unknown or whose remains have not been identified.

The 94-year-old monarch had requested the service – her first public engagement in London since March – after being advised to celebrate the warrior's 100th birthday next week, to be attended by the Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall. If you do not participate in an abbey service, you will join on November 11th, Armistice Day.

People were encouraged to attend commemorations on Sunday by sharing family stories, personal stories and reminder messages online using the hashtag £ WeWillRememberThem.

Meanwhile, genealogy company Ancestry made more than a billion British war records freely available over the weekend for people to discover the role of their families in WWI and WWII.

Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said: "Many of the men and women who are in the parade today have already taken part in efforts to fight the coronavirus and many more will do so in the coming weeks.

"I applaud your selflessness."

Around 10,000 veterans would normally pay their respects at the cenotaph, but this year there are only 26 due to the risks posed by Covid-19. Pictured: The veterans today

Around 10,000 veterans would normally pay their respects at the cenotaph, but this year there are only 26 due to the risks posed by Covid-19. Pictured: The veterans today

Union leader Sir Keir Starmer and his predecessor, former Prime Minister Tony Blair, walk down Downing Street to the cenotaph ahead of today's ceremony

Mr. Blair was wearing a face mask

Past and present: Union leader Sir Keir Starmer and his predecessor, former Prime Minister Tony Blair, walk down Downing Street to the cenotaph ahead of today's ceremony

Former Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron was also there to show his respect

Chancellor Rishi Sunak was also present

Former Conservative Prime Minister David Cameron was also there to pay his respects, as was Chancellor Rishi Sunak

Former Prime Minister Theresa May walked Downing Street before joining other politicians at the cenotaph

Former Prime Minister Theresa May walked Downing Street before joining other politicians at the cenotaph

General Sir Nick Carter, Chief of Defense Staff, said some veterans would find Memorial Sunday this year a lonely experience due to the existing Covid-19 restrictions.

Sir Nick told BBC One's Andrew Marr Show that the guidelines were "particularly strict on our veterans," adding, "They traditionally had the opportunity to meet and share their memories and reflections, but also their stuff present."

Vice Marshal Chris Elliot, Controller of the RAF Benevolent Fund, said: “Services across the UK will unfortunately look and feel very different this year, but the important thing is that the meaning of Remembrance Sunday has not changed.

“Today remains a poignant reminder to ponder the valor and sacrifice of all who have served.

& # 39; The tenacity and camaraderie of previous generations in their struggles should inspire us all as we address new challenges that Covid-19 poses.

"It should also remind us of the great debt we owe our veterans to keep their memories alive."

On the occasion of Memorial Sunday, members of the public were invited to share their family stories and memorial messages online using the hashtag #WeWillRememberThem.

In other parts of the country, veterans have also paid their respects while following social distancing guidelines. Pictured: Members of the Royal Tank Regiment suspend Covid-19 mass testing at St Stephens Church in Liverpool to observe the two-minute silence on Sunday

In other parts of the country veterans have also paid their respects while following social distancing guidelines. Pictured: Members of the Royal Tank Regiment pause the Covid-19 mass tests at St Stephens Church in Liverpool to observe the two-minute silence on Sunday

In Glasgow, veterans were also in force to pay their respects, despite asking the public to stay home during the second coronavirus lockdown

In Glasgow, veterans were also in force to pay their respects, despite asking the public to stay home during the second coronavirus lockdown

In Durham, residents gathered at the city's main war memorial to pay their respects to lost family members on Remembrance Sunday

Pre-booked visitors stand at the National Memorial Arboretum in Alrewas, Staffordshire, and watch the “virtual” act of remembrance of the Armed Forces Memorial broadcast to others via Facebook and YouTube

Pre-booked visitors stand at the National Memorial Arboretum in Alrewas, Staffordshire, and watch the “virtual” act of remembrance of the Armed Forces Memorial broadcast to others via Facebook and YouTube

Wreaths were placed at the memorial to commemorate the sacrifice of fallen British soldiers and women

Wreaths were laid at the memorial to commemorate the sacrifice of fallen British soldiers and women

Seymour & # 39; Bill & # 39; Taylor, 95, of Colchester, Essex, who served as a skilled seaman in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Emerald during the D-Day landings, joined the neighbors on the road to watch the two minutes on Sunday

Seymour & # 39; Bill & # 39; Taylor, 95, of Colchester, Essex, who served as a skilled seaman in the Royal Navy aboard HMS Emerald during the D-Day landings, joined the neighbors on the road to watch the two minutes on Sunday

Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden said: "While this year's service is a little different than normal, I encourage everyone to get involved from home – watch TV on your television, do your family history research – but most importantly, be safe."

The memorial services come after the former chief of the Lord of the Royal Navy, West of Spithead, launched a backlash against a ban on church services and warned veterans Get pneumonia by being forced to stand outside.

How to get involved in Memorial Sunday

Although this year's memorial service at the cenotaph is closed to the public, the government says there are many ways to get involved.

People have been invited to share their personal and family stories on social media using the hashtag #WeWillRememberThem.

You are also invited to pay homage to the Royal British Legion's virtual memorial box or the Commonwealth War Graves Commission's memorial wall.

Brits can also watch the Sunday cenotaph service on TV and online

Other ways to get involved are:

  • Support the poppy seed appeal by donating by mail and displaying your own poppy seed or reminder window.
  • Have a small memorial service in your yard or write reminders for veterans or servants.
  • Look up your own family history on Ancestry. The company gave them access to this year's commemorations.
  • The Royal Air Force Museum is asking people to write poetry to get into its online gallery.

Coronavirus lockdown restrictions in winter mean that most church services are banned and anyone caught visiting could face a £ 200 fine.

John & # 39; Paddy & # 39; Hemingway, the 101-year-old last survivor of the Battle of Britain, is said to be upset by the move.

His son Brian Hemingway said the veteran was "sad" that people couldn't get together on Sunday.

However, the growing turmoil from former senior military officials and former Defense Secretary Michael Fallon has led to calls for an exemption so that the day can be properly remembered.

Lord West of Spithead, the former First Sea Lord, told The Telegraph, “If you look at the average size of a church, there has to be a way to let veterans in with social distancing.

“It seems very stupid to leave them outside in the freezing cold season. This puts them at greater risk. You are more likely to die from pneumonia than from Covid. & # 39;

The Royal British Legion previously confirmed that there will be no annual March Past the Cenotaph.

On its website, the charity said it recognized the decision was "deeply disappointing," adding that it was made on the recommendation of the government.

Government guidance enables local authorities in England to organize events at a "public war memorial or cenotaph" as long as they are outdoors, brief and those present adhere to social distancing measures.

Former Prime Minister Theresa May also criticized the decision to ban church services.

She told the House of Commons: “The Covid-safe reminder service at Worcester Cathedral is now being converted to a recorded online service.

"Surely the men and women who gave up their lives for our freedom deserve better than that?"

Former Secretary of Defense Sir Michael Fallon said, "Veterans are perfectly capable of social distancing and wearing face masks for half an hour, and I hope the government will reconsider." It seems ridiculous. We trusted veterans to risk their lives for the country, but we cannot trust them to stand two meters apart in church. & # 39;

Several members of the House of Lords raised concerns about the impact of the move on people's mental health, pointing out that for many older people, attending church was their only regular social activity.

Parish Minister Lord Greenhalgh defended the rule, saying: "We have reached a critical point in the fight against Covid-19."

He stressed the need to "limit our interaction with others" and said: "It is with great regret that services cannot take place at this time, although the places of worship remain open for individual prayer."

Although the public will not be able to attend today's ceremony, the event will be broadcast live on multiple channels, with attendees encouraged to partake in the two-minute silence at home. Pictured: Ronnie Wilson, Scottish World War II veteran

Cathy Drummond, Women's Auxiliary Air Force Veteran, at her home in Scotland

Although the public will not be able to attend today's ceremony, the event will be broadcast live on multiple channels, with attendees encouraged to partake in the two-minute silence at home. Pictured: Scottish World War II veterans Ronnie Wilson (left) and Cathy Drummond pose with their war medals in front of their homes ahead of Sunday's commemorations

The leader of the Liberal Democrats, Sir Ed Davey, was also pictured en route to the cenotaph

Sir Ian Blackford, Chairman of the SNP House of Commons

Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey was also pictured en route to the cenotaph along with the leader of the House of Commons of the SNP, Sir Ian Blackford

Prince Harry attends the West Point Military Academy in America in 2010

Prince Harry crawled with his Apache in 2012 during his 12-hour shift on the UK-controlled airline at Camp Bastion in southern Afghanistan

Prince Harry, who had spent 10 years in the armed forces, described the day as a "moment of respect and hope" in an interview with the shared podcast

Tory peer Lord Cormack squeezed the minister, saying he had "provided no evidence as to why churches shouldn't be open to public worship".

He said a memorial service has been scheduled for that Sunday at Lincoln Cathedral, which will be "a huge space where everyone can be appropriately socially distanced."

Lord Cormack added, “Instead, the government has come up with a stupid answer – that the veterans, all 90 and over, can stand in the cold and rain, but cannot go to a safe, socially distant cathedral.

"That's a shame."

The cenotaph was usually manned by members of the armed forces, veterans, and ordinary British people on Memorial Sunday

The cenotaph was usually manned by members of the armed forces, veterans, and ordinary British people on Memorial Sunday

The Queen wears a face mask for the first time in public as she celebrates 100 years of the Unknown Warrior at Westminster Abbey

By Bridie Pearson-Jones and Jack Wright for MailOnline

The Queen wore a face mask for the first time in public last week as she celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Unknown Warrior's funeral in a small private ceremony at Westminster Abbey.

Her Majesty, 94, paid tribute to the British soldier, whose identity remains a mystery, and the royal family's own connections to World War I at the London Abbey ahead of Memorial Sunday.

The head of state, dressed all in black when she laid a bouquet of orchids and myrtles on the grave, had to cover her face during the service under government restrictions.

It reflected the custom of placing royal bridal bouquets on the grave, a tradition that began in 1923 when Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, the future Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, laid her bouquet as she opened the abbey in memory of her brother Fergus entered. who was killed in the Battle of Loos in 1915.

Many royal brides have since sent their bouquets to the grave of Westminster Abbey.

Before her death in 2002, the Queen Mother also asked to place her funeral wreath on the grave of the Unknown Warrior – a wish that was granted the day after her funeral at the abbey.

Tribute: The Queen commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Unknown Warrior, an unknown British soldier who died in World War I at Westminster Abbey on Wednesday

Tribute: The Queen commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Unknown Warrior, an unknown British soldier who died in World War I at Westminster Abbey on Wednesday

Paying their respects: The Dean of Westminster Abbey, David Hoyle (right), watches as the Queen's Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah, places a bouquet of flowers at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior in front of the Queen at Westminster Abbey

Paying their respects: The Dean of Westminster Abbey, David Hoyle (right), watches as the Queen's Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah, places a bouquet of flowers at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior in front of the Queen at Westminster Abbey

Commemoration: The Queen inspects a bouquet of flowers that Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah, is asked to place at the tomb of the Unknown Warrior

Commemoration: The Queen inspects a bouquet of flowers that Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah, is asked to place at the tomb of the Unknown Warrior

Pay her respects: The 94-year-old Queen drove from Windsor Castle to London to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Unknown Warrior, according to the court's circular. The Queen was photographed leaving Windsor Castle yesterday (pictured) before returning two hours later, but the reason for the trip was not disclosed

Pay her respects: The 94-year-old Queen drove from Windsor Castle to London to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Unknown Warrior, according to the court's circular. The Queen was photographed leaving Windsor Castle yesterday (pictured) before returning two hours later, but the reason for the trip was not disclosed

Tribute: Lt. Col. Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah lays a bouquet of flowers on the grave of the Unknown Warrior during a ceremony at Westminster Abbey

Tribute: Lt. Col. Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah lays a bouquet of flowers on the grave of the Unknown Warrior during a ceremony at Westminster Abbey

Paying respects: The Queen's Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah, lays a bouquet of flowers on the grave of the Unknown Warrior on behalf of the Queen during a ceremony at Westminster Abbey

Paying respects: The Queen's Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah, lays a bouquet of flowers on the grave of the Unknown Warrior on behalf of the Queen during a ceremony at Westminster Abbey

Tribute: The Queen inspects a bouquet that her Equerry placed on her behalf at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior

Tribute: The Queen inspects a bouquet that her Equerry placed on her behalf at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior

What royal bridal bouquets were placed on the grave of the unknown warrior?

  • The Queen Mother, 1923
  • The Queen, 1947
  • Princess Margaret, 1960
  • Princess Alexandra, 1963
  • The Princess Royal, 1973
  • Diana, Princess of Wales, 1981
  • Sarah, Duchess of York, 1986
  • The Countess of Wessex, 1999
  • The Duchess of Cornwall, 2005
  • The Duchess of Cambridge, 2011
  • The Duchess of Sussex, 2018
  • Princess Eugenie, 2018
  • Princess Beatrice, 2020

During this week's ceremony, Her Majesty also spoke to the Dean of Westminster in prayers and a moment of reflection after the bouquet was laid on the grave before the Queen's Piper played a suit, The Flowers of the Forest.

The Tomb of the Unknown Warrior is the final resting place of an unknown British soldier who died on the battlefields during World War I. The soldier's body was brought from northern France and buried in Westminster Abbey on November 11, 1920 after a procession through Whitehall.

The Queen's grandfather, King George V, placed a wreath on the coffin at the cenotaph that was unveiled on the processional route.

His Majesty later dropped a handful of soil from France on the soldier's coffin as the soldier was lowered into the abbey grave.

He was accompanied to the funeral by his son, future King George VI.

The unknown warrior became an important symbol of mourning for the bereaved and represented all those who had lost their lives in the First World War, but whose place of death was unknown or whose bodies remained unknown. It remains a solemn tribute to all service employees who lost their lives in the battle.

The Queen was photographed leaving Windsor Castle on Wednesday before returning two hours later. It is believed that she is now self-isolating with husband Prince Philip, 99.

She looked somber in a black ensemble that was normally only worn during mourning, at a funeral, or during Memorial Day and Sunday services.

The November 4th Judicial Circular reads: “The Queen this morning commemorated the 100th anniversary of the burial of the Unknown Warrior at Westminster Abbey, London SW1, and was welcomed by the Dean of Westminster (the very venerable Dr. David Hoyle) on the Great West Door received). & # 39;

The Queen

The Queen's Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah

Tribute: The Queen pays tribute to the unknown warrior while her Equerry, Lieutenant Colonel Nana Kofi Twumasi-Ankrah, carries a bouquet of flowers to place on his grave

Tribute: The unknown soldier was buried in Westminster Abbey on November 11, 1920. However, due to lockdown restrictions, commemorations had to be held in advance. File image

Tribute: The unknown soldier was buried in Westminster Abbey on November 11, 1920. However, due to lockdown restrictions, commemorations had to be held in advance. File image

The Queen & # 39; s Piper plays during a ceremony at London's Westminster Abbey that the Queen attended last week

The Queen & # 39; s Piper plays during a ceremony at London's Westminster Abbey that the Queen attended last week

Royal Commemorations: The Duchess of Cornwall also held an engagement at Westminster Abbey yesterday, campaigning for Prince Harry to visit the Field of Remembrance

Royal Commemorations: The Duchess of Cornwall also held an engagement at Westminster Abbey yesterday, campaigning for Prince Harry to visit the Field of Remembrance

Wearing a poppy seed face mask, Camilla, 73, honoring the soldiers and women who sacrificed their lives for their country, stood in solemn silence as the final post played

Wearing a poppy seed face mask, Camilla, 73, honoring the soldiers and women who sacrificed their lives for their country, stood in solemn silence as the final post played

This tradition was first completed by the Queen Mother when she married King George VI in 1923. Princess Beatrice's wedding bouquet is pictured on the grave earlier this year

This tradition was first completed by the Queen Mother when she married King George VI in 1923. Princess Beatrice's wedding bouquet is pictured on the grave earlier this year

King George V paid tribute to the Unknown Warrior when in 1920 he placed a wreath on the coffin at the cenotaph in Whitehall, London, which was mounted on an arms wagon

King George V paid tribute to the Unknown Warrior when he placed a wreath on the coffin at the cenotaph in Whitehall, London in 1920, which was mounted on an arms cart

The coffin of the Unknown Warrior resting at Westminster Abbey in London before the 1920 funeral ceremony

The coffin of the Unknown Warrior resting at Westminster Abbey in London before the 1920 funeral ceremony

The Queen has only had a handful of engagements since March and is expected to stay in the background for the next month as she and she The 99-year-old Duke of Edinburgh is locked together at Windsor Castle.

The Duchess of Cornwall also got engaged at Westminster Abbey yesterday and campaigned for Prince Harry to visit the Field of Remembrance.

She then stood in front of crosses from the graves of the unknown when the dean offered prayers before solemnly laying her own memorial cross and bowing her head thoughtfully.

A beeper played the last post, followed by a two-minute silence and a reminder as Big Ben rang at 2 p.m.

Then the Duchess and the rear admiral of the surgeon Lionel Jarvis, the president of the poppy seed factory, visited the 308 parcels with more than 60,000 crosses and symbols of all faiths, which were laid by staff and volunteers.

Memorial services on Sunday, which are traditionally part of the community service, cannot take place on November 8th as planned due to lockdown restrictions

However, instead of being banned entirely, the government has put in place a set of guidelines for local authorities and religious leaders hoping to hold the services.

The coffin was deposited in the old abbey two years after the end of the First World War before his burial

The coffin was deposited in the old abbey two years after the end of the First World War before his burial

Prominent politicians and members of the public attended the funeral ceremony of the Unknown Warrior at Westminster Abbey

Prominent politicians and members of the public attended the funeral ceremony of the Unknown Warrior at Westminster Abbey

The warrior's coffin was carried into the abbey by soldiers who were flanked by other members of the military prior to the burial ceremony

The warrior's coffin was carried into the abbey by soldiers who were flanked by other members of the military prior to the burial ceremony

In 1981 the bridal bouquet of the Princess of Wales was placed on the grave of the unknown warrior after her marriage to Prince Charles

In 1981 the bridal bouquet of the Princess of Wales was placed on the grave of the unknown warrior after her marriage to Prince Charles

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