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Migrants entering British waters via the Canal to have dinghies blocked by nets


Britain is said to use nets to deactivate dinghies and send migrants back across the canal

  • Dan O & # 39; Mahoney has been named Clandestine Channel Threat Commander
  • He has put in place his four-step plan to curb illegal crossings
  • It turns out that more than 7,100 migrants have come to the UK this year

Migrants entering British waters via the Channel have their dinghies "deactivated by nets" before being sent back to France.

Dan O & # 39; Mahoney, the new Clandestine Channel Threat Commander, has put in place his four-step plan to curb illegal crossings.

The former Navy has reportedly confirmed the willingness of the UK authorities to use a "safe return tactic".

The move came after it was found that more than 7,100 migrants have come to the UK this year alone.

Migrants entering British waters via the Canal will have their dinghies deactivated by nets before being sent back to France. Pictured: A group of people are brought to Dover, Kent, by Border Force on the Channel on Friday

The four-step plan to curb illegal crossings

  • Attempt to stop the flow of migrants from Africa and the Middle East to northern France;
  • Reducing the number of people leaving the region for the UK, including through the dismantling of camps;
  • Physically prevent entry into the UK;
  • Reform of the country's asylum system to reduce the UK pull factor.

In an interview with The Sunday Telegraph, Mr O & # 39; Mahoney said staff would disable migrant boats before British ships were used to bring occupants back to France.

The method is similar to the method tested by the Royal Navy to clog boat propellers and force an immediate stop.

Mr. O & # 39; Mahoney, who appointed Home Secretary Priti Patel in August, said: & # 39; We are investigating tactics to make safe interventions to bring migrants back to France …

"We are definitely very, very close to implementing a secure return tactic where we intervene safely on a migrant ship, take migrants on board our ship, and then bring them back to France."

He added that this tactic was just one of many "which we can use in the next few months".

The number of clandestine arrivals currently tops 300 a day – the highest number ever recorded – after a sharp drop in air and rail travel by air amid the coronavirus pandemic.

However, the implementation of the new method is likely to be delayed as France is currently refusing to take back migrants.

Mr O & # 39; Mahoney told the publication that the government has used social media campaigns and officials posted abroad to urge potential migrants from Africa and the Middle East to seek asylum in the first safe country to arrive to apply.

Hopefully this will prevent them from risking their lives on an "incredibly dangerous voyage" on the world's busiest shipping lane to illegally enter the UK.

Mr. O & # 39; Mahoney insisted that his team's first priority is still to save the lives of those at risk by trying to make the crossing.

However, that objective was closely followed with an emphasis on securing the British border and building public confidence in the operations.

Dan O & # 39; Mahoney, the new Clandestine Channel Threat Commander, has been hired by Home Secretary Priti Patel, who was appointed in August

Dan O & # 39; Mahoney, the new Clandestine Channel Threat Commander, has been hired by Home Secretary Priti Patel, who was appointed in August

The number of clandestine arrivals currently tops 300 a day - the highest number ever recorded - after a sharp drop in air and rail travel by air amid the coronavirus pandemic. Pictured: dinghies believed to have been used by migrants have been stored in a port authority yard in Dover

The number of clandestine arrivals currently tops 300 a day – the highest number ever recorded – after a sharp drop in air and rail travel by air amid the coronavirus pandemic. Pictured: dinghies believed to have been used by migrants have been stored in a port authority yard in Dover

The interview comes just days after the Home Office made proposals that migrants attempting to cross the canal could be detained on disused ferries.

Government sources had insisted that the ideas – leaked last week – were only part of a brainstorming session.

But a source told The Sun, “There is a real determination to address this issue and things are moving forward now. The ferry schedule is running. It happens. & # 39;

Officials were told to start discussions about buying two unused boats to make processing centers and staying off the Portsmouth coast.

About £ 6 million could buy the Home Office a 40-year-old ferry that could accommodate 1,400 asylum seekers, The Times reported.

Permission to accommodate migrants on ferries has not been granted, said a Interior Ministry spokesman.

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